Daily Sculptors Page

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14,815 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Hi all – here is a goat I did a couple years back. Now I’m working on a camel and thinking of the best way to make his long skinny legs. Has anyone tried rebar? The camel is also a bit of a challenge because its long neck and head stick out and imbalance the sculpture, maybe putting a weight in his belly/feet will help…. Thoughts, experiences? Thanks 🙂 sarah

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    • I just love your goat. The pattern that covers her is perfect. I had a pet goat for over 8 years, she is gone about 3 years now, and I still miss her. Great job 🙂

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      • Thank you very much 🙂 we raise dairy goats and love their personalities, they make great pets! I am experimenting with ‘henna’ patterns on my creations…

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    • I have used rebar for a heron’s legs-I bought the rebar and then took it to a nearby metal shop and had them cut it and bend it in the angles I wanted. I did not want to mess around trying to do it myself, though you can. There are several youtube tutorials on that. The thinner rebar can be cut with a hacksaw. How big is this camel going to be? Maybe using PVC piping would be easier and lighter weight for you. Good luck and keep us posted.

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      • Wow, PVC is an intriguing idea! I’ve been hesitant about using rebar for some of the reasons that you mentioned (though the look is so perfect for heron legs..). I like that PVC could keep the whole sculpture light. Materials can be a little difficult to source where I am but I think that straight pipe should be acquirable. Thanks for the inspiration

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  2. Here is a pic of my first ever paper mache creation. Done almost a year ago before I discovered paper clay. He’s made using the old paper/paste method.
    Tina

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    • I’ve also never used paper clay, but want to for my next project. What has your experience been? Love the gator (or croc?), what did you use to make him shiny?

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      • Thank you Sarah. I’ve found the air dry clay is much easier to work with and gives better results especially for details. I still use crumpled paper to fill out my armatures and sometimes paper/paste or paper clay, as my first layer depending on the project. I used 3 coats of gloss clear coat as a final finish to make him shiny. I used the outdoor clear coat because I want to put him in my garden. I’ve found that if I smooth the clay with damp fingers before letting it dry I get a much smoother surface without sanding. Because I have arthritis this is much easier on my hands. Be careful not to get too much water though as this thins the clay too much. Hope you have as much fun experimenting and creating as I do.

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        • Thanks for this advice. I am looking forward to the clay-ing stage, with any luck I’ll have the body armature complete today and can move on to the fun sculpting stuff. To clarify; you are using the air dry clay with the joint compound incorporated, right?

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  3. Hi Everyone…newbie here. I just finished an elf planter that I’d like to share. Looking at the different creations here I know I have a lot to learn. Hope you enjoy my first sculpture as much as I did making him.

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      • Thanks Gussie. I used the doll eyes tutorial from a guest on this site as a guide. Hard to believe that this creation started out as a balloon, an empty masking tape roll and a large coffee can! I’m having so much fun!

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    • Wow Tina for a first try that is great, can’t wait see what you end up making, but I will warn you, its addictive 🙂

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    • This is wonderful work, Tina! He looks like something I’d see at a store. What did you use for the eyebrows? Did you do anything to water proof him?

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      • Thanks for all the compliments everyone. I’m already addicted…lol. For the hair and eyebrows I used a natural craft fibre (found at a thrift store for $0.50) and glued it on. I put 3 coats of outdoor clear coat on him which is waterproof.

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      • Thanks Marilyn. I’m working on a parrot right now. Hope to have it finished next week if my hands hold out (arthritis).

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        • Tina, I hope you post some progress photos of your parrot. I have a parrot on my wish list, of things to make. My Mom likes blue & yellow macaws, and I would love to give her one (a paper mache one).

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          • I’ll try to post some progress pics of my parrot. The armature is very simple…a large styrofoam egg for his body and a small styrofoam ball for his head. I used light weight cardboard to make his beak & tail. The legs and wings will be sculpted with air dry clay directly on his body. This will be a folk art type parrot.

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    • That is beautiful Leah. Paper mache has come a long way and the pool of artistry on this site proves it. Wow!

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    • Yes, I saw an article about them this morning. I still haven’t decided quite what I think of them. Beautiful. But…

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      • Beautiful, but I do find the stretching a bit weird looking. I guess what interests me is just the challenge of creating something like that.

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  4. Hi Jonni and everyone else. I really need some help. I am trying to make a sea dragon (remember Jonni’s dragon challenge ( long..long time ago) well I had a baby but in between have been working on it) I am having a real hard time with the fins..they are very fine and I really want that look..but how the heck can I get it???? Basically the fin is a wire with a card stock at the end for the fin..how do I cover the wire with out making it look so thick and weak? Can I do something else to the wire to make it rust prof and still look good? Maybe cover it in floral tape and paint it? PLEASE HELP! I can not get this out of my head and it just isn’t what I want.
    I have added a quick pic here so you can see what I mean…. and here is a link to a picture of the a real sea dragon encase you don’t know what it is…
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=sea+dragon&FORM=HDRSC2#view=detail&id=6F7019523F993A46AE0AEBB03E34FE31A5E2FB95&selectedIndex=4

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    • If the wire might rust, it’s a good idea to cover it with masking tape. You could then give it one or two coats of newspaper held on with the old flour and water paste. If you just use a little bit of paper, just enough to encase it, and give you a nice surface for painting, it shouldn’t get too thick. I can’t wait to see your sea dragon – it sounds like a wonderful project.

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      • Thanks Jonni, I tried to cover the taped wire in strips of paper mache…umm what a mess..lol anyways I couldn’t get the paper to stick with out unraveling…I than tried glue and water… I then truly became one with my project I had paper on my face, elbows, clothes,table and of coarse attach to my fingers..jesh. Any tricks on how to actually apply the little strips on to a very narrow wire would be very welcome 🙂 I am trying something new for now and when I figure this out I’ll post a picture.

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        • Heh – I can see it now – paper strips and paste on the hands, the floor, the dog. We’ve all been there. Part of the fun, right?

          For wrapping wire, you need to use short pieces of paper, and start with one end down on the wire. Hold it down, and wrap the rest of the paper, slowly. Don’t use too much paste. You’ll get the hang of it, I promise. 😉

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        • I don’t know if it will help, but on small places and pieces, I like to use paper from a telephone book (Dan Reedy’s idea). It loves to stick to your fingers, too 🙂

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          • Thanks Karen I also like Dan’s book and blog…always learn something from him and Jonni .Plus all the feed back and experiences from the readers and members are always informative . I owe a lot to Jonni with out her I never would have discovered paper mache.

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      • Hi Leah, What a great suggestion… have you ever tried this? I’m sure it would work. I am going to definitely try it out but I need to be able to still paint the wires to go with the rest of the sculpture. I will experiment and let you know how I handled it in the end.

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  5. Very nice cross! If you want to quickly make it less shiny, just spray it with satin or flat clear spray paint. You can find the spray paint at the big hardware stores or possibly craft stores..& definitely online. Even if you’ve passed the cross onto someone, if they want it less shiny, they can just spray paint it.

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  6. Just a little update on the paper mache Budai I am making. The basic shape is ready to be covered with paper mache clay for the detailing now once it is all dry. I’m going to try and make paper mache clay with the paper from my shredder and some wall paper glue to see how that will go. More progress pictures can be found in the albums on facebook by clicking my name.

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    • That looks like a big project – and it’s coming along nicely. Let us know how the paper pulp layers worked for you.

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  7. Hello all! Here is the snow goose that I have finally completed. I want to thank all that offered advice on the painting of the white. I took Karen’s idea of making a scrap to experiment on. The one chosen was to do the whole thing in white, then add a transparent glaze of a pale blue gray(thanks Jonni and Gussie) I then dry brushed again with white. Lastly, a mixture of burnt umber and yellow ochre to dry brush and get her a bit dirtied. I actually used white house paint as that is not as brilliant white as titanium white. Thanks for all the help from the paper mache community!

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        • This is awesome! I recently did an African Crane (see pic) but could not achieve a feathery texture without using clay/joint compound. How did you achieve the effect?

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          • Thanks Larry, I used Jonni’s regular clay for this piece. For the head and neck, I used the clay tools to painstakingly carve out the downy look. Also, before it dried, I lightly tapped the clay to get small pieces to stick up-so it would look more like fuzzy down. For the tail feathers, I cut out individual feathers for the armature, then covered them with the clay and carved feather lines in them. It was tedious but you get into the zone, you know?
            Your crane is really cool-he has a great expression on his face and the paint job is superb. You should post this pic again on the front page of the daily sculptors page. I know everyone would love to see it and they might not go this far back to get to see it. Aren’t birds fun to sculpt? Really nice job.

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          • Larry and Eileen, again, I think your birds are awesome. I want to do a chicken for my brother, and I’m going to try and get in the zone to do the individual tail feathers. I like the result you got, Eileen. What you said helps because I’m just in the beginning design stages, so I will know the tail feathers are going to be added on. Helpful information. I agree with you, Eileen, that Larry should post this at the top of the page. Not everyone is like me and only gets on the computer occasionally!

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      • Eileen, that snow goose came out great. I like the way you textured her/him. I am sure there will be a lot of requests of friends and family to help find it a new home.

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        • Thanks for the nice comments.
          Marilyn-It is about 2 feet tall, almost life sized but not quite.
          Christine- I thought of you as I was photographing it. It did not fit in the light box that you steered me into making. I had to just take it sitting on the bureau, that is until I make a larger light box. 2 of my kids are vying for the goose, they say it’s their favorite- but they say that after every new sculpture so they can’t be trusted. It’s nice to have some fans however!

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      • That is a beautiful goose. Well done. Thanks so much for sharing and for the inspiration. I even like the stand!

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        • Thanks Rex- the base is a slab of wood that I picked up at Michael’s, in the wood burning section. My son is actually in the tree business and he has made them for me before but I didn’t feel like waiting months for it to dry out- I wanted it now! What a brat I am.
          Since this is a 2 legged creature, hard to get it to stand up right, I made the leg armature with 2 thick wires twisted together, made the legs, then drilled holes into the base so it could stand while I was working on it. It worked great- but cover the base with plastic wrap if you try it.
          You mentioned on one post that you were afraid to try doing a bird. You should try it- they are great fun.

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          • Eileen, I’m working on a chicken pattern tonight (for my baby brother). He loves chickens and is coming to visit in May. I will do the wires. One day I’m going to start doing birds. That may be the end of me. I love birds. Thanks.

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    • Really inspiring work! Thanks for sharing on your facebook page as well. What did you use to seal them? Will they be able to go outside or you did it for indoor? Great work!

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      • Michele I used a Krylon Satin Finish. It is a spray and needs a lot of ventilation, it dries fast. I don’t think it would last very long outside.

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        • Marilyn the finished project is awesome. You incorporated two different kinds of action which really adds lots of life to the piece.

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        • Marilyn, I showed you chickadees to my friends. We all agree that they look very real. You did a great job on all stages of your project.

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        • Hi Marilyn, Your bird sculpture is awesome. I was wondering how you went about covering the branch so nicely..I’m having some trouble covering some wire size fin steams.

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          • Hi Tammy.
            That branch is a bent wire coat hanger. The leaves are cut out copy paper, covered with masking tape, with a smaller wire attaching the leave to the branch. These smaller wire had some masking tape on them, but it was only to hold them in place. I just started at the base with Jonni’s paper clay, adding small amounts at a time. Letting it dry completely before adding more. I used the water and glue mixture each time to add the wet clay to the dry. I hope this will help you.

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            • Thanks Marilyn. I will definitely take a breath and slow down…. after all this is paper mache…lol. I looked up patient and low and behold the definition says it all:
              patient (?pe???nt) —adj: 1. enduring trying circumstances with even temper: 2. tolerant; understanding: 3. capable of accepting delay with equanimity

      • Marilyn, I can’t find your facebook page; I would love to see how you did these. The wings are fantastic. (I’m afraid if I started doing birds, I would never get back to anything else!) Thanks. Great job.

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        • Hi Rex
          Jonni has given us a great way to share our sites. If you move your mouse over my name and click on it, this should take you to my Facebook page. I hope you like it 🙂

          Thank you Jonni for sharing all the information, recipes, tutorials, and your web site. You are a very giving person 🙂

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  8. I am sorry the photos are so big, I do not know how to control that. They are made from your air dry clay, and one chickadee is held in place by fishing line. There is a small lady bug on the feeder and seven air dry clay sunflower seed in the feeder.

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    • I looked at your facebook page and these are a great series of photos. It will really look great once it is finished. But I really love the idea that you incorporated a flying bird. That is genius.

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    • Thanks, Marilyn. I hope everyone clicks on your Facebook link, because you have a lot of progress photos, and I know they’ll want to see how these lovely sculptures were created.

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  9. Hi jonni
    i really enjoed your videos. I love to make a paper lamp shade that i saw sometimes ago.i need to know how to make torsoe of a doll to be atached to the shade.i will sand you picture of it my problem is size, also.
    Thanks
    Anoosheh

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    • You could make a little wire and foil armature, and cover it with paper mache. That’s an interesting lamp. Where did you find it?

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  10. lol thanks Rex. Ive taken a semester off school so im able to spend a little more time with the artsy stuff. Ive got a few more not quite done, ill post them when their finished. I took pictures of the cross as I did it if you want to see the album here https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.244788485689530.1073741852.153420148159698&type=3
    It really wasnt that hard, im doing another one for my wife with figures on it, that ones taking me a little longer.

    Mike

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    • Thanks for the facebook link. Wow. Can I copy you? This makes the process more accessible. (The friend who would love it has colon cancer, and she has had a rough go of it.) It really helps to see the process because I can make anything simple really complicated! LOL!

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        • I am with Rex on this one- I’d also like to copy your idea. I just made some paper pulp out of this cardboard packing stuff that an appliance came in-adding some glue and linseed oil to it. I was trying to think of a sculpture to do with it when I saw your post. This pulp will come out less smooth than Jonni’s 2 clays, the celtic crosses are so old and weathered that this may the perfect project for that pulp. Thanks for sharing them.

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  11. I made this Celtic cross for a friend of mine last week. I used a cardboard armature with mache clay coating it. A little bit too shiny, my next one will effeminately be finished with a matte finish.

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    • Mike that is gorgeous. Have you tried the stone spray from Krylon? You can get them in different colors. You could make a small cross and try it out. I you look at my post on doll furniture you could get an idea what it looks like.

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    • Mike, good to see you back and see what you are doing. The cross is crazy good. Took me right back to Ireland! I have a friend who would love that, so I’ll add it to my wish list!

      And the bau relief is great. Awesome job. I used to grow moss roses (small flowers that like the heat) in the rocks around the pond. I’m putting that on my list, too. Thanks to you.

      Great job. (You know there is someone lurking behind your bau relief; don’t you?)

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