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15,067 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Hello, I am just getting started and have tried mixing my first batch of the clay. I’m living in Scotland right now, and don’t know if the joint filler is the same as in the US. The brand is Polycell and it’s called ‘Multipurpose Polyfilla’. I’m also using washable clear glue by Elmers. I could not find any Elmers glue-all. The clay has turned out to have a meringue like texture. I beat it for a couple of minutes, I’m not sure if it was long enough, but the mixture seems smooth, just very light and air filled. Any thoughts on this? Is this the correct texture? It doesn’t spread like the clay I see in your videos.
    Anyhow, I wanted to see if there were thoughts on this, from anyone here And of course from Jonni . Maybe there’s someone who lives in Scotland and knows which filler to use?
    Last question, is it OK to wash everything out in the kitchen sink? I know with the cement clay it’s not. But it sounds like all of this is water soluble…? If that’s not true, please let me know!
    I’m really excited about doing this and I really appreciate this website and the videos. So I’ll be grateful for any and all advice! Many thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Cindy. I wash my utensils and bowl in the sink when I make paper mache clay. Unfortunately, I can’t answer your other questions because I don’t have access to the products you used. I just checked online to see if the Elmer’s washable clear glue is a PVA glue, and it appears that it is. So the problem might be coming from the polyfilla you’re using. I hope someone will jump and give you some help. (I’ve never heard of the paper mache clay turning into something like meringue!)

      Reply
  2. Hi all, any suggestions, if possible to turn a papermache into a liquid form for use like a clayslip. I need to make a lot of figures quickly but I want something more durable like papermache. I know Activa have a product that may be suitable, but they don’t ship to me. Thsnks PJ

    Reply
    • If you’re asking about paper mache clay, don’t think it would work, if you hope to put it in a plaster mold. Paper mache clay will stick to the plaster, and you’d never get it out. I’ve tried to think of a way to make a DIT version of Li-Qua-Che, but the only thing I can think of is mixing ground paper with liquid casting latex. It would be an expensive experiment, and even if it works I don’t think it would cost less than the Activa product. A gallon currently costs $36 on amazon.com, and a gallon of casting latex is $47. The addition of paper would make the latex go a little farther, I suppose.

      The problem really is the plaster molds. Ceramic slip doesn’t stick to the plaster, so you can use the molds over and over. Li-Qua-Che works the same way. But any paper mache product will have some form of glue in it to hold everything together, and that means it will stick to plaster unless you use a release. And if you use a release, the plaster won’t pull the water out of the paper mache slip, so you’d have to put in a very thin layer by hand, instead of pouring it in and then pouring it back out after a skin is formed next to the plaster.

      So – that’s a long-winded way of saying no, I can’t think of a way to make a paper mache slip that works like a clay slip. But if you can find a way to do it, please let me know! 🙂

      Reply
      • We do get some requests for a paper mache clay that can be poured into a plaster mold, like the Activa Li-Qua-Che product, but I’ve never been able to get that to work. My recipe sticks to plaster, and would ruin the mold. It also needs to be applied in a thin layer, so it can dry all the way through without cracking as it shrinks and dries. So yes, we would be very interested in an alternative recipe that doesn’t have those limitations, even if it needs to be used in silicone molds!

        Reply
  3. Hello, Jonni! We so love your work! My six-year-old daughter and I have made the cat, fox, and wolf masks.

    I’m wondering–can the horse pattern be used for a child’s mask? I’m not sure if it is the right size.

    Reply
    • Hi Alice. I’m glad you and your daughter are having fun making your masks! 🙂
      The horse was designed as a sculpture, and not a mask. In fact, the head itself won’t work if placed in front of a human face, because horses put their eyes on the sides of their head, so the human won’t be able to see out. However, a few people have altered the pattern to be used as a headdress mask, by putting the bottom of the neck on a cap or bicycle helmet. If you want to try that, you’ll have to experiment with it, because the extra weight of the neck and head could make the headdress mask fall forward. Here’s an example of the horse made with foam instead of cardboard, and placed on a cap: https://www.ultimatepapermache.com/wolf-eva-foam-trial-update

      Reply
      • Hi there, Jonni,

        Thank you, Jonni, for your message! Oh yes, makes sense! I’d not thought of how they are prey, so they look out to the side….

        I decided to plug away at this anyway. I’ll post my attempt-in-progress. I enlarged the pattern a bit, only made the front part of the horse (and cut away some of the side of the head).

        I find your work so inspiring!!! It is wonderful to spend time making your patterns with my family.

        Reply
  4. Hi. I printed the bear pattern on regular printer paper. Can I glue each piece onto the cardstock. (Similar to the girraffe pattern)? I dont understand the importance of using the double layers of shelf paper.
    Do I need to reprint the pattern pieces?
    Thank you for your help
    Peggy ?

    Reply
    • Hi Peggy. Yes, you can use a glue stick to attach your pattern to cardstock. The tabbed patterns, like the bear, are difficult to put together with heavier cardboard. That’s why we use the cardstock for the bear and elephant. However, it is also less stiff, so we have to protect it from the moisture of the paper mache.

      Reply
  5. Can you please tell me how to attach something (like hanging wire) to hang the baby elephant on the wall. I don’t want to ruin it by making holes in it.
    How do you hang it? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Rachel. I put one small hole in the back piece and put it over a nail. It works really well. I don’t know if the command stick-on hangers would work or not. With all the work that you did to create your elephant, you wouldn’t want to use something that wasn’t strong enough to hold it.

      Reply
  6. Hi all, I am in Australia and used Boral Joint compound on my last sculptures, without the flours and oil but this time I thought I would try following the recipe of Jonni’s. Well, I made rubber. Jonni thinks there is boron in the compound and going by the name of Boral, it suggests boron. This clay sticks to everything but the sculpture. Yes it dries but it can’t be smoothed as it sticks to whatever you are using to make it smooth. I live rural so if my local hardware store doesn’t supply Gyproc, I will have to order some in. Will try to keep you posted, but has anyone other Aussie had this issue?

    Reply
  7. International Artist Day isn’t until October 25th, so I’m just having a little, personal Artist (singer, actor, etc.) Appreciation day. So, thank you, Jonni, for being an amazing artist, a generous and kind person, and one of my favorite people in the world.
    Also a Shout Out to another fave of mine, Rex Winn.
    And to all the wonderful, creative people who contribute here at Ultimate Paper Mache. If you ever wonder if you or your art make a difference, please believe me, you do and it does.
    Love to you all.

    Reply
    • What a nice thing to say, Mister Shelbot! On behalf of all of us, I thank you. I agree that each and every time someone posts here, either to show us their work or to give encouragement to another artist, it reaches far more people than they realize. Thanks for reminding us. 🙂

      Reply
  8. Hi all. We had a big storm here in SW Minnesota, and my power is out. If you’ve tried to send me an email or posted photos, I won’t be able to get to them until the power is back on, perhaps sometime next week. I’m writing this comment at my daughter’s house. 🙂 I hope you’re all well and making wonderful sculptures! 🙂

    Reply
  9. thanks! I’ll check with Pauline. I really love what you are doing with your art! and how special that you share it with us!

    Reply
  10. I have been working on the horse head pattern and would like it to have a mane that flows down his neck, maybe with a slight breezy look. My question is whether it would be better to paint the horse before I add the mane so the color of the body shows through (with whatever touch-ups it needs after adding the mane). Also, I want a dapple grey horse with dark mane. would it be possible to color the paste to get a better base color before I paint highlights, etc. Thanks for any comments anyone may have! I love the bunny and giraffe I made. Now I need a bigger shelf for future projects!

    Reply
    • Hi Diana. Pauline posted some photos of her dapple grey horse. She gave it a light mane instead of a dark one, but I’ll bet she could give you some good ideas if you put a comment on her post. It can be really difficult to paint under something that has a lot of detail, like a mane, whether it’s made with paper mache or with a softer material. If it’s possible to paint the neck first, it would probably help. You can add pigments or paint to paste or paper mache clay, but you might not be able to get a really dark color because of the other ingredients. Try testing a small batch to see if you like it.

      I hope we get to see your horse when it’s done. It will look really nice next to your giraffe and bunny. 🙂

      Reply
  11. Good morning-
    Can the patterns be enlarged when printing or will it compromise the integrity of the pattern. Most specifically, the Jack rabbit.
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Yes, you can enlarge any of the patterns, as long as you enlarge each page the same amount. Set the printer to 150%, or however much bigger you want the finished piece to be, and make sure to set it the same on every page. Have fun with it! 🙂

      Reply

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