Daily Sculptors Page

Join the conversation and share your paper mache sculptures with our supportive community.

No artwork to share today? That’s OK, too… We’d love to hear from you. Just scroll down to the bottom of this page and use the comment form.

The latest photos from our readers:

14,794 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. This is Layla the Bull Terrier. She recently passed away and her daddy was very distraught over losing her. His wife ordered this sculpture of Layla as a Father’s Day gift. He loved it and said it was the best gift he’d ever received.

    Reply
  2. Actually, it was an interesting process trying to create an armature that would support the rose. I used floral wire to start. The wires run through the stem and up into the flower itself. Then I padded the wire with a little bit of foil and wrapped the foil with masking tape. The leaves are made of pieces of posterboard that I also wrapped with masking tape. After that, I took your clay and applied it over all of that. The petals took forever to do because I could only do two petals at a time. I applied them carefully over and around the wires so that that would be supported enough. Then I would have to prop the rose up in a certain way so nothing drooped while those petals dried. Once they dried, I turn the rose and do two more petals and so on, until I had a rose.

    But it was worth it! I love it. So glad you do too. I’ll post a finished pic soon!

    Nikki

    Reply
  3. Hi Jonni,
    Just wanted to show you a rose I made using your paper mache clay recipe. I really like your clay so much more than only doing the paper strips and paste. I’ll post a finished picture of the rose once I take one. I love the painting part too, I just wish I could get the paint into all of those tight crevices! Hope you like the rose!

    Nikki

    Reply
  4. Hi
    I’m now on chapter 5, Emperor Penguins. There is a small bird here in Atlantic Canada called the Atlantic Puffin. But this little guy can fly. He dives for fish out at sea and only comes ashore to nest. When they stand up tall sometimes their tails touch the ground. A three point stand like the Penguins, so I’m going to try a Puffin. A real puffin stands about 12 inches, as an adult. This is close to that size.

    Reply
    • Miroslav, your car is very nice and all of your bugs are amazing. You must have spent a lot of time and it shows, great job.

      Reply
  5. Dear Jonn,

    I would like to send you warm greetings and let you know that I am your big admirer. I enclose a few pictures of my work – the longhor beetle and the Tatra car.

    I would like to keep on posting some more photos of my work.

    I followed your discussion about the drying of the models – I use the gas heating Trumatic E 2400 (from the caravan) and the big paper box. You can set the temperature there and the models are dry within 24 hours there. Using the gas is cheeper than using the electricity and it also allows me to work quickly due to the time saving.

    Thank you for the possibility to present my work on your site.

    Your sincerely

    Miroslav, Czech republic

    Reply
    • Miroslav, your work is amazing. Do you have a post on your site that shows how you create such realistic insects? I would love to see how you do it.

      Reply
    • This piece is so realistic i cant even believe its mache. So I’ll ask what everyone is no doubt wondering… HOW? lol, really though, I looked up our version of that little beetle, and logistics of how you did it are way beyond me.

      you sir, are a master. 🙂

      Reply
  6. Hi,
    I just discovered this site while searching for info on the effects of humidity on paper mache’.
    I’ve only been working (read:playing) in this medium for about 8 months and have a few pieces done with others in different stages of completion. Finances were a heavy contributing factor in using glue/paper for modeling. My parameters I set for myself were to do the best I could with as little as I could. Here are a few pics; and if anyone has info (or a link to such) on the humidity thing it would be greatly appreciated. I’ll make an effort to be a regular. 🙂
    Coin in foreground to gauge size. Approximately 1:64 or “S” scale in model railroad lingo.
    Although I do work on this project each and every day, the picture below is in fact about 1 week old, and is of buildings awaiting lighting and accoutrements. Video of a lighted Forge on website btw.

    Reply
    • Hi Tiki Carol, I live in the Pacific Northwest by the water and it can get pretty humid here. I used to dry my glue and paper mache projects in my oven at a low temperature, until I got my electric bill. The sun can get quite warm in the summer and my car even hotter than the outside. so, if I was not driving I would put my paper mache projects on the front seat and the outside glass of my car. That would dry my projects quite nicely. I would put a layer or two of non glossy varnish when I was sure my pieces were quite dry. Then when I was satisfied that the piece was finished I put the gloss varnish on. I have a bowl that I have had for many years now and the humidity seems not to be a problem.

      Reply
    • These look kind of Japanese-like. Are they a part of a model railroad? They are very interesting, and if they light up also, how original! Very nice work!

      Reply
      • These are actual buildings found in the video game “World of Warcraft”. I love the artwork in the game so much I had to bring it into the real world so to speak. I was originally shooting for HO model railroad scale, but it ended up being slightly bigger than that, (“S” scale or “American Flyer” in train lingo) which worked out great in the end because THAT scale is 1:64 which is used for table top gaming.

        Reply
  7. Ok- I have a question I would like to put out to Jonni and the daily sculptors(sounds like the name of a new rock band) Anyway, I am currently doing a beaver sculpture. I thought it would be neat to try using both of Jonni’s clays in one sculpture. I will be using the regular clay for the furry parts and the smooth air dry clay for the feet, hands and tail. My question is this- does anyone have an idea on how I can get the texture on the beaver tail? In the cartoons, a beaver tail has a bunch of criss cross lines but in actuality, the tail looks like it has scales, like a snake. When I did a snake, I made a little tool out of wire with an oval on the end and put in each scale by hand. That was rather laborious and I wasn’t all that happy with the end product. I have been searching the house for something I could use to get a scale look. Paper towels and napkins don’t cut it. I even looked at the kitchen cheese shredder to see if I could imprint it. Any ideas guys?

    Reply
      • I did not make a life sized beaver- they can get to be 70 lbs! That’s as heavy as my rather large dog! The tail is about 8 inches long so I am thinking an onion bag may work. I’ll let you know. Thanks.

        Reply
  8. Hello Janna!
    I would like to introduce you to a few products from our studio. Everything from paper.
    All greetings Miroslav – Vendulka
    Sorry for the language, translate across compiler

    Reply
  9. Finished my sun sphere and I got a place to show it off. (whoot) Not sure what to charge for it but I’ll figure it out soon I hope. Anyway tell me what you guys think. (the bowl is mine as well)

    Reply
    • here’s the elephant I made as well, ha ha and my sad attempt to make it look bronze, of course this is showing the imperfection along the top and it looks very light when it’s really darker then this. But I did make an elephant!

      Reply
      • and the bowls I made, with the candle holders, that could be used as anything really, I made everything you are seeing except for the candles off to the left. those belong to the other lady sharing the space with me.

        Reply
        • and here’s my little space, not really huge but it will work. At least I can show my stuff off and see what happens. Nothing has prices yet, but I will add those later. I even saved 50 bucks making the letters myself, which the ‘i’ has a light bulb over it and of course a heart for her ‘o’ that I made for our last names.

          Reply
    • Taria, the sun sphere is absolutely gorgeous and would make a nice decoration in a room. I do love the colors. The elephant is also cute.

      Reply
    • Taria, I really like your sphere! Good luck with a sale! The bowl is nice, too.
      OH! Now that I’ve looked at the rest of the pictures, I REALLY like your elephant! You have a nice little space for selling your things – GOOD LUCK! 🙂

      Reply
    • I’m Liking your sun sphere. Gave me an idea for an octopus over a rock. (I know, how’d he get from sky to sea. Lol.) Nicely done.

      Reply
  10. Is it possible, or realistic, to cast a negative mold of a mache piece in Plaster. Then once its dry, simply apply a thin coat of mache on the inside of the negative mold to get a quick armature skin (not sure what to call it) that can be added on from the inside?

    That didnt sound at all clear, anyone know what im talking about?

    Reply
  11. I am wanting to made a 17″ Dragon that will be laying down. The body is fairly thick so I will need something to fill up the middle inside. What do you think about aluminum foil and alumimum wire armature?

    Reply
      • I am going to decoupage fabric for his “skin” but I wanted to use some type of Metallic substance for his spines and on his wings. I was thinking Angelina Fibers or some of the Tattered Angles Metallic sprays. Any suggestions?

        Reply
    • I haven’t always had luck in getting paper mache clay to stick to aluminum foil. I remember it was a problem with my Eldo sculpture.

      Reply
      • So true. However, it will stick to itself, so if you surround a horn or other appendage with the paper mache, it should work OK. For flat areas, though, you’re right. PM won’t stick to foil.

        Reply
  12. Very nice Marilyn! I especially like the tail feathers. The glaze looks good in the picture- are you being too hard on yourself? How big is this rooster?

    Reply
  13. Hi everyone, I finally finished my chicken/rooster. I have never used the glazing before. I think I should have used black in my glaze instead of the brown, since the body of the rooster is black. The brown can be seen over the black. Oh well, the best part is I’m still learning, great book Jonni.

    Reply
    • I live in South Dakota, and we didn’t have a tornado here. The area around Oklahoma City is devastated, though. Horrible – it looks like an atomic bomb went off. If any of our readers live down there, I doubt you’re reading this right now, but we do all pray for you, and hope you’re well.

      Reply
      • Jonni,
        Thank you for your prayers and well wishes. My kids live in Oklahoma City, and Praise God, they survived safely.
        I am in the process of documenting my steps for using the cloth armature of the dog. Thank you for all your encouragement and sharing your incredible talent.

        Reply
      • Give me a hurricane over any other natural disaster–that is what I say. Of course, I prefer it when we don’t have them. They can be damaging…but unlike other natural disasters, you can predict when they are coming and make preparations. It always amazes me when people who come from states that have earthquakes or tornadoes fear hurricanes, because to me the other natural disasters are far worse.

        Reply
        • Hurricanes can just as destructive (Ivan devastated my hometown of Pensacola, FL in 2004), but at least people have lots of warning time – sometimes several days – so they can evacuate. I lost all my big, beautiful oak trees, my roof, and my septic system. Of course, this sounds trivial compared to the devastation caused by an EF5 tornado, but the trauma is very real for all survivors of natural disasters. Prayers are with the dear folks in Oklahoma.

          Reply
          • I didn’t mean to sound callous. Yes, I realize hurricanes can be destructive. During Wilma, our air conditioner blew into our house. If I had went into the kitchen when I felt hungry instead of deciding to finish my homework in my bedroom, I could have possibly been killed.

            BUT…we have warning, and we can prepare ahead of time. I find that extremely comforting.

            Reply
    • Hi Irini, thank you for your concern. I’m sure many of our readers and contributors lived in an area that got hit by hurricanes. Fortunately I wasn’t one of them, but I’m praying for those who may have been.

      Reply
  14. Hi Jonni, at college I am doing a whole proect on your style of work. I have already done the sitting cat but instead of using the paper mache clay I have used MOD-ROCK. I have painted me cat black but the only problem is that the coat looks so flat. I dont know how to paint it so that it looks ‘furry’. Is there any chance you could give me a few pointers??

    Hayley

    Reply
    • Hi Hayley. Great idea using the plaster cloth – it’s a lot faster than paper mache, isn’t it? I agree that large expanses of black tend to be rather lifeless, so I suggest that you add several layers of “fur” using brush strokes in the direction of real cat hair, and vary the color just slightly with each layer. You could warm up the black with some brown paint for one layer, cool it down with some blue paint for the next, lighten it to give it a grey cast with a dab of white, etc. It will be more realistic, and it will be a lot more interesting. Black animals are tough to paint, but you’ll get it.

      Reply
  15. PS: I draw/painted him several times:

    Once in acrylics, once in pastell chalks, one is a pencil drawing. Please have a look at my homepage! 😉

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Heads up! You are attempting to upload an invalid image. If saved, this image will not display with your comment.

Heads up! You are attempting to upload a file that's too large. Please try a smaller file smaller than 250KB.

Note that images greater than 250KB will not be uploaded.