Paper Mache Bunny Ballerina is Bronzed

“Bronzed” Ballerina Bunny, part 6

Bronzed Bunny Ballerina – kind of trips over your tongue, doesn’t it? This final step was the easiest one – just paint on the bronze coating, spritz with the patina stuff, let it dry, and spray clear coat over it.

The bunny got done just as my house project did – just a few more tiny details and the house will be put back together again. When I bought the place, I really only intended to change one little thing – the upstairs hallway had a drop ceiling that was way too low. Easy to fix, right? Now, many weeks (and dollars) later, I have new floors downstairs, new trim around the doors, the fake wood paneling is gone – and so is that drop ceiling. Whew! Am I the only one who starts “little” projects like that, and can’t figure out where to quit?

But enough about my silly house. Go watch the video to see how the bunny turned out.:)

To see the rest of the Ballerina Bunny series:

65 thoughts on “Paper Mache Bunny Ballerina is Bronzed”

  1. I have been missing my hobby of 40 years[model railways] as I have no room in my new home.
    not a very happy girl[70 year old]. then I found you and a new phase started. I love your work and you are such a good teacher.I have baught your books and made a horse to go in my Chrismass bay window display. I live in a retirement village in country Australia and the residents loved it .This year I plan on making a father Christmas workshop theme but also want to make the figures move and am trying to learn how to do it. I would love you to bring out a book on dolls, but I’m realy into the paper mache. Thank’s for doing what you do…Kay

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  2. If you get rid of all the coyotes, you are going to have rabbits, unless you are lucky enough to have hawks/falcons, if only seasonally. I think an attitude on Rabbit Rescue probably depends on whether or not one is looking out the window at wildlife, or trying to grow some flowers/vegetables. I think she’d be a wonderful addition to a ballet studio, a library, a gallery, or just about anywhere one would display a sculpture. She’s definitely display window candy!

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  3. The only thing I can think of is to use Celluclay and leave it unfinished or varnish it with very very low sheen varnish. But I want to use your mixture of Jonniclay for this project, and am gathering low cost tools to do it with. Hopefully the Walmart paint mixer attachment won’t disintegrate when I use it with the high speed drill that I have. And I have a feeling that if I let the Walmart food processor I have do the mixing that it will probably explode halfway through. Probably just use that for shredding the paper part only and will mix it with the other ingrediants in a large pail with the drill plus attachment. Now if I only get the model finished. So far I only have the shoulders and upper torso done with the wood glue and paper. Thanks for the pointers.

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  4. All I can add is BRAVO, BRAVO, BRAVO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you for the links also. One small question…where do you buy the medical grade plaster guaze?

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    • Thanks, Chawol. I got this batch from Brick in the Yard (I think they’re in Texas, but the ship fast). I’ve also seen it advertised on Amazon.com. It sets faster than the hobby store plaster cloth, and it seems to be stronger. For something like this rabbit’s tutu, though, the hobby store version probably would have worked just fine. I just happened to have some of the good stuff left over from another project, so I went ahead and used it.

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  5. Jonni,
    She reminds me so much of the ballerina that Degas created in bronze, only yours is much cuter! I think the patinas worked out so nicely, you did a wonderful job! I’m glad you got your house finished, too. Just in time! Now you can dedicate yourself to your next project! Thank you as always for sharing and being such a great inspiration for we aspiring artists.

    Have fun!!
    Ann

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    • The cat is only sweet when she’s getting what she wants. When she wants cuddles and doesn’t get them fast enough, she bites my ankles. But I like her, anyway.

      The bunny is now sitting in my newly refinished living room. I’m not sure if that’s where she’ll stay, but she seems to feel at home there.

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      • Hah. That’s cats for you, eh? 😉

        If you felt moved to donate her, I bet a great home could be found for her. Like – off the top of my head – the children’s zone of the local library, or perhaps a bunny rescue group! 😉 I’m sure she looks fabulous in your new living room. Wait ’til you get a little more jaded with her, perhaps. Besides, you’ll need room eventually for all the ensuing sculptures!

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        • Good ideas – although I’m not sure there’s a bunny rescue group here in town. This is the only city I’ve ever lived in where wild rabbits greatly outnumbered the outside cats. They come right up on the porch and look in the patio doors. When you look down at the sidewalk, you see rabbit pellets all lined up in the cracks. And this is just three blocks from center of town. It’s a lot of fun, to watch them, actually – but might not be quite as much fun when the lettuce comes up in the garden. Since some of the “wild” rabbits don’t look like cottontails, maybe letting unwanted Easter bunnies loose is a local tradition that takes the place of a bunny rescue group. (Someday I’ll ask somebody where all the rabbits come from, but they may look at me a little funny…)

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          • That would be interesting to watch! I wonder if the loose cats eat the rabbits? I know our one former feral could. The tiny town north of me also has what appear to be domestic rabbits wandering at will. I bet you’re right about how they got there. I’m impressed they survive the S. Dakota winters, though!

            Well, so, okay, maybe not a local pet rabbit rescue group. Maybe you could weather-proof her, and use her as a scare-rabbit for your lettuces. Super Uber Ballerina Rabbit says, “THESE LETTUCES ARE MINE! BE GONE, BEFORE I BATTEMENT ON YOUR HEAD!” 😉

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  6. Jonni, she turned out just beautiful. I enjoy watching your video tutorials and seeing your techinques. I look forward to seeing your next materpiece.

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  7. I loved watching your ballerina bunny. She looked like a lot of fun. I still think the cat sculpture was my favorite. I see your cat loves being in all of the filming. Got to love her.

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  8. Wow Jonni, she came out beautifully. This bunny does not have one over Degas, he would have been jealous. I hope she gets a place of honor. She belongs in a museum. Paper Mache as an art form has come a very long way and this proves it.

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  9. Wow, that looks really great. I am just starting to experiment with your paper mache recipes. I thank you for taking the time to teach us.

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  10. Bella Bunny. Did you consider using Paverpol for the skirt? I’ve never used this, and wonder if it could have worked better than the medical gauze. When you did the base coat how did you avoid spraying yourself and the whole room at the same time? You know bronze effects are beautiful, but they tend to darken just a little too much. The lightening effect lifted some of that. Is it part of the same line of products?

    Will you be marketing, donating or keeping your ballerina? I would be sorry to see her go if she was my creation.

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    • I haven’t played around with Paverpol, but that is what it was designed for – so it would probably work great. I didn’t want to spend any money on my bunny, so I used what I had around the house. The bronze coating doesn’t seem to darken over time, if you use a clear coat over the top. And yes, the Traditional Tan Patina is also from Sculpt Nouveau.

      I’ll keep the bunny. I didn’t design her well enough that I would trust the UPS guys to get her to a new home intact. And I don’t know anyone who would want a donated bunny, so I guess that means I get to keep her.:)

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      • Silly question about spray paint – anyway, what if I wanted to do a patina on something that simulated bare grey concrete after applying your clay?

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        • Hi Joanne. I know there are spray paints that have different colors inside, and are specially formulated to look like stone. That might work. The “patina” products only work on metalic finishes, I think, but you can simulate them somewhat by mixing acrylic colors with either acrylic glazing liquid or acrylic matte varnish, and washing or spattering them over a painted surface. I think that might work – but I’ve never tried it. Let us know how you decide to tackle this, it sounds interesting.

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    • Thanks, Patch. I did spray a bit of patina on her lower half, too. It didn’t show up very well in the photos, because I tried to keep it fairly light.

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      • Oh count me in! Ravens are on my to do list too. I will try your new recipe for smoother paper clay for them.

        What is it about these handsome birds that is so fascinating? There sure are a lot of legends and stories. Not all of them flattering.

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        • They’re so smart, and they have such interesting behaviors. Plus, of course, they’re beautiful birds. I did make one this week, but the legs came out wrong so I’ll try again – no video yet, but I hope to have one done soon.

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