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Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head

Jackrabbit Pattern for a Paper Mache  “Faux Trophy Mount” Wall Sculpture

$12

Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head

A jackrabbit “faux trophy mount” is a silly idea – but that’s what makes it so much fun.

The pattern creates all the shapes for you. After it’s taped together and you’ve added a layer of paper mache, you can paint it any way you like.

Need a Jackalope trophy? Just draw some horns on cardboard and add them before painting – lots of people have done it, (scroll down to see some of them), and they’re adorable! 🙂

How to Make Your Jackrabbit:

Print the downloadable pattern, and cut out the pieces.
Print the downloadable pattern, and cut out the pieces.
Tape the pieces together, as shown in the instructions and the videos below.
Tape the pieces together, as shown in the instructions and the videos below.
Add a layer of paper strips and paste, or paper mache clay.
Add a layer of paper strips and paste, or paper mache clay.
Bring your jackrabbit to life with acrylic paint.
Bring your jackrabbit to life with acrylic paint.

Finished size –

About 11.5 inches (29.21 cm) high, 8 inches (20.32 cm) wide and 6 inches (15.24 cm) deep.

My downloadable PDF Patterns come with full instructions.

There’s no waiting for your pattern to arrive, and no shipping costs, so you can start on your project right away.

Click here if you’d like to know more about how the patterns are delivered. (If you’ll be saving your pattern to and iPhone or iPad, they do tend to hide your files. You can scroll down this page to see how to find them.)

And remember – if you have any problems downloading your files or putting your pattern together, just let me know. I’m always happy to help.  😀

Be sure to watch the videos below to see how the pieces are taped together, and how I painted mine. Of course, you can paint your own jackrabbit any way you like. 🙂

When you’re done, you can mount your new jackrabbit over a nail, as I did for the photos at the top of the page , or you can get fancy and attach it to a wooden plaque for that true ‘faux trophy mount’ look.

$12
Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head
Pay Securely with Stripe or PayPal

Watch these videos to see how to use this pattern:

To make this paper mache sculpture you will need:

  • The front and back of two standard cereal boxes, or four letter-sized pieces of light chipboard.
  • A small scrap of corrugated cardboard for the back.
  • Access to a printer
  • Scissors for the cereal box cardboard, and a box cutter for the corrugated cardboard.
  • Copy paper or full sheet labels.
  • Glue stick if you print your pattern on copy paper.
  • Clear plastic tape and masking tape.
  • 1” (2.54 cm) foam ball for the eyes
  • Glue gun (optional)
  • Small amount of aluminum foil
  • Paper Mache (use paper strips and paste, or paper mache clay. Recipes can be found by clicking the Recipes tab at the top of the site.
  • Acrylic Paint and acrylic varnish
$12
Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head
Pay Securely with Stripe or PayPal

Just a few of the Jack Rabbits Made by My Readers…

Note – some of the jackrabbit sculptures below were made with the first version of the pattern. The new version has slightly different shapes – see the photos at the top of the page.

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Do you have a question or need help with your pattern?

If you have a question about putting your pattern together or painting it, leave a comment below or on the Daily Sculptors page. I read all comments and answer them as soon as I can, usually within a few hours. Some of my readers might ideas for you, too — we have a very supportive community on this site.

Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head

101 thoughts on “Easy Pattern for Paper Mache Jackrabbit Head”

  1. Hi Jonni, I am drafting a jackrabbit. I plan to use your pattern for the head. Can you please tell me the approximate width and height of his neck ( the part that mounts onto the wall)? Knowing this will help me to determine if I need to scale the head up or down in size in order to fit it to my body armature. I know there will be a certain amount of experimentation involved, but those measurements (plus maybe circumference?) will be super helpful.

    Thank you! I’m excited about this project!

    Sue

    Reply

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