Daily Sculptors Page

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14,943 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Hi Jonni,
    I just discovered you on YouTube and you’re my favourite teacher and guide to paper mache. I’m new to this, and having lots of fun. I bought your Jackrabbit pattern, and it’s all together except I’m not sure where to attach the ears. I likely missed something in the instructions…

    Reply
    • Hi Lee-Ann. Thanks for the kind words. 🙂 The ears go on the back of the bulge on the top of his head, very near the top of the neck. They’ll overlap pieces 29, 30 and 33, and the two ears will meet in the middle. This screen shot gives you a little better view:

      I hope this helps. If you need more photos, let me know. I took a few of my completed rabbit, and I can add them if you need them.

      Reply
  2. Jonni not only have you created great art but also a great community which is fabulous! Thank you! I’ve just started playing around and will post images later. I have a few questions. Is there a difference between Elmer’s Glue All and Elmer’s School Glue? I had the school glue so that is what I used when following your recipes for both the paper mache clay and the silky smooth air dry clay. I used the recipes with the gram measurements when available. My clay seemed to be a lot wetter and stickier then yours. Have you or anyone else in “your community” used the school glue and noticed a difference? Also can you use a diluted glue to seal a final project if it isn’t going to be painted? The project would be an interior piece but I would like to protect it from moisture and humidity. Thank you and your community.

    Reply
    • Hi Diane. I don’t really know what the differences are between Elmer’s School Glue and their Glue-All, except for what I just found online. The school glue is supposed to be easier to wash out of your clothes, and it takes longer to dry. Maybe that means that the school glue is wetter, which could be causing your problems. I live in a really small town and I can’t buy school glue here, but one of these days I’ll do another experiments with it. I did one years ago, and decided that I didn’t like using School Glue with the paper mache clay – but it’s been so long that I can’t remember why not. 🙂

      You might be able to get a thicker, less sticky paper mache clay by adding more flour than the recipe calls for. Try it on a small batch to see if it helps.

      The best protection for unpainted paper mache that’s displayed inside is acrylic varnish. I prefer this Ultra Matte varnish on my animal sculptures, because you really can’t see it after it dries, but it will protect the paper mache from moisture. From what I read about school glue, it isn’t at all waterproof – that’s why it can be washed out of clothes. It wouldn’t be a very good option for sealing your work. Maybe other kinds of glue would work, but varnish seems like a better choice to me.

      Reply
      • Thank you, Jonni. As always you are generous in sharing your thoughts and quickly reply to questions. The fact that you did experiment with the two types of glue and chose Glue-All tells me there must have been a good reason even though you can’t recall the reason now. Maybe there really wasn’t a difference but you could get the Glue-All more easily. If you found that the School Glue was better I imagine you would have found a way to get it. I did add more flour afterward because it was just too wet to work. I do have to keep better notes as I work though because I don’t know exactly how much I added! I will try starting with less glue and see if that works. I will also check out the varnish you recommended. I did not think the school glue would work as a sealant but was wondering if the Glue-All would work. You have so much experience, do lots of experiments, and a community that also gives feedback, I know it is a great resource so I went there. Thanks again and I will try your suggestions.

        Reply
  3. I am making a Blue Footed Booby and his tail feathers are sticking out at an angle. I would like to have the individual feathers, rather than make a single piece showing all the feathers. If I use a high quality cardboard which is just the right thickness, is it acceptable to use the cardboard as is, as long as it is painted? Have you or anyone else done this?

    Reply
    • I haven’t done it, but I can’t see why it wouldn’t work. People make entire sculptures out of just paper or cardboard. I had to go look up Blue Footed Booby on Google to see what they look like. Those feet look like neon lights or something! What a great subject for a sculpture. I can’t wait to see how it turns out.

      Reply
  4. Has anyone ever tried doing a papier-mâché box? I’m making a craft closet for my craft and sewing supplies. I’m not able to find the boxes that I like at a good price or that fit my needs to put in there. I started thinking about those small papier-mâché boxes that you can buy at the craft store. I wondered if you could get those in a larger scale. I couldn’t really find any so decided to make my own. Hoping that papier-mâché will make it sturdier and give the finish I want it to have.

    Reply
    • Hi Sarah. Quite a few of the people who submitted ideas for our “practical paper mache” project used flat cardboard to make various boxes and shelves. The biggest problem with using flat cardboard with paper mache is that it tends to warp, although Stephanie recently made a jewelry box and was able to overcome the problem by wrapping the cardboard with masking tape.

      I think it’s a great idea to use paper mache to make a cupboard to store craft supplies, and if you use sturdy cardboard it should be strong enough. But do some tests firsts to make sure you can keep the cardboard from warping.

      Reply
      • Thank you for the fast response! Good to know about the jewelry box. My trial run is with foam core put together with masking tape and it’s REALLY taped up with masking tape. I’m down to the end of my second roll. I took a picture of it all taped up and will post on the practical papier-mâché page when done. Will include photo of final product. The next time I’ll use taped up cardboard to see how it turns out. Thank you again!

        Reply
      • Second thought on cardboard—I read if painting on cardboard using acrylic, prime first with white gesso. I wonder if the cardboard was sealed with gesso if that would prevent warping? I would probably seal then tape anyway but it’s a thought.

        Reply
    • I had problems with wilting cardboard when using PM clay directly on shoebox/cereal box type material… tape it up REEEEALLY well for extra sturdiness! If your box needs even more support or if you want to use more clay, support the sides even more by embedding popsicle sticks. My favorite “box” I’ve paper mache’d without strips is a wooden cigar box (highly suggested), but plastic pencil boxes like the ones used in for elementary kids works really well too. ??

      Reply
  5. Hi Again Jonni,

    I am doing my first cardboard armature and filling it in with aluminum foil. It is a fairly small piece, 10″ x 4″. It is a sugar glider. I am having one heck of a time applying the foil. I am having to use a lot of my glue gun. Is that normal?

    Reply
    • Probably – you can use less glue if the pieces of foil are larger, or if the foil is crumpled tightly enough that you have more flat surface to attach to the next piece. Maybe someone with more glue gun experience than I have will be able to be more helpful… 🙂

      Reply
      • I was just going to ask the question of which glue sticks to buy, as I was trying to glue aluminum pieces together and was also having issues. I’ve had these glues stick probably for 20 years. So, there is probably better options out there now for them.

        Reply
    • I recently had the same issue and then things still wouldn’t stick. I was using some really old glue stics that were then made almost ply for fabric. I recently purchased some gorilla glue sticks that specifically mention metal. I haven’t tried them yet though.

      Reply
  6. Jonni, I have your book, Make animal sculptures. I was wondering, when you are making your own pattern from a photo, how do you know what size to make the styrofoam blocks for the legs? Do you just guesstimate and then adjust accordingly?

    Thanks, Sharon

    Reply
    • Hi Sharon. I think it’s fair to say I guess, but I try to look at photos of the animal from the front and back. This shows you the width of the animal’s chest and rear, so you can make a good guess. If you’re still really not sure, an easy way to make the separators adjustable is to use crumpled balls of foil instead of the foam blocks that I used in the book. You can squish the foil if you decide the legs are too far apart, and you can change the angle of the legs, too. I hope this helps. Have fun! 🙂

      Reply
  7. Hola Jonni saludos fraterno desde Venezuela. Amiga yo trabajo con papel mache pero necesito plantillas de las mascaras, estoy haciendo un trabajo que es realizar las mascaras de los animales , para hacer una gran asamblea y discutir y difundir los artículos que aprobaron en la asamblea nacional en defensa de ellos, soy una mujer humilde y no tengo recursos para comprar esas plantillas pero quiero trabajar ayúdeme por favor.

    Reply

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