Daily Sculptors Page

Join the conversation and share your paper mache sculptures with our supportive community.

No artwork to share today? That’s OK, too… We’d love to hear from you. Just scroll down to the bottom of this page and use the comment form.

The latest photos from our readers:

14,805 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Here’s an update on my sun! Think he needs more depth with the color, but I’m almost done and I’m very happy with the outcome so far.

    Reply
  2. Hi Jonni can I show you my latest mini? I made this 17th century wheellock pistol for my latest doll, Queen D. Luisa of Portugal.
    The pistol has a fair amount of air drying clay but also has lots of papermache too, some cardboard, starch, acrylic and metallic paint, well the usual 🙂

    Sarah love your peacock!

    Reply
    • Lovely, Pedro – as always.

      By the way, your comment got caught in the spam filter again. If you don’t see your comments show up within a few hours, be sure to let me know so I can go find them. I don’t know why the system keeps doing that to you. 🙁

      Reply
    • Pedro, are you nuts? (Try making a list of all the words Americans use for “crazy!”) Do you have tiny hands. I don’t know how you do it. Simply amazing. I love seeing what you are creating. That is one gun I wouldn’t mind owning. Thanks, again.

      Reply
    • Wow! Pedro, you never fail to amaze! To get such detail! You are the miniature master…that should be your new name!

      Reply
  3. Well here I am again trying to tell everyone how beautiful their creations are without naming each of the sculptors . Typing on an iPad is slow when you can only use one hand .. I can type like a whirlwind on a computer ….well maybe not a whirlwind…but a lot faster than this. I am writing this from a hospital bed where I have been since Friday noon. Seems I was getting a bit better and then my daughter got the flu, then Joyce got the flu and Joyce winds up with not only the flu but viral pneumonia in both lungs l have been pretty ill, but hopefully will be home in a day or two,or three. Crying my heart out because I have got three or four kinds of purchased air dry clay waiting to be made into treasures and only 22 days til Christmas. How many until next Christmas?
    Jonni, if this was for your gratitude page I would say that right at this moment I am so very grateful for my ipad that allows me to visit from my hospital bed where I lay all covered with welts and bruise from their taking great quantities of
    blood for various tests. I really wanted to make those little birds and chicken.. I wonder if they would let me bring my clay and tools in so I could work while I get better. Guess not eh! (I am a Canadian)

    Did I mention that I’m in isolation in this huge room in the newest part of the hospital. It is a corner room at the end of a long corridor with huge windows on
    two sides and it is about 50 feet long and half that much wide. Two beds and only me in here. At night it is so quiet I get the feeling that I am really alone. Last night I was taking pictures of all the lights. Jonni, feel free to edit if this is too long. You can tell by this long epistle that I am not at deaths door, but a little sick and very lonely. My son comes to visit, but visitors don’t really want to visit where they have to wear a plastic visor on the top part of the face and a cloth mask beneath that so that they can speak and I can almost hear them…but it is what it is, isn’t it? Thanks in advance for listening.

    Reply
    • Joyce, you’re really getting hit with more than your fair share of illnesses this year. I’m glad you’re feeling better, but do take care to not get any more germs! And if I may make a suggestion? Tell family and friends that Christmas will be delayed this year. Someone just made up the date anyway, you know (nobody really knows when Jesus was born, so just have your Christmas in February. That would give you plenty of time to use up that lovely air dry clay. 🙂

      Reply
      • Yeah. Jonni reads my mind. I give presents whenever the mood strikes me. I have had a friend for 52 years, and she may not get a present for years and then two or three in a year. She never knows, and neither do I. Take care. Thanks for writing.

        Reply
      • Thanks for your kind words, Jonni. This has been a bad year for me, health wise. Art wise I managed to do a small watercolour painting of a sea green wave for a friend who adores it. This fall I did 20 assorted greeting cards for a men’s club that my husband belonged to. When he was alive, I used to do them on a regular basis, but this was the first request in almost five years. They were so pleased they sent me a $50 bonus on top of what I charged. I just got them finished before I got sick the first time.

        The reason I need to have Christmas on the day is because we have a very small gathering, daughter, son, two grandsons and me and Misty, the cat. On the second of January, my son leaves for his annual 3 month vacation in Costa Rica and we won’t be together again until Easter so it is kind of important we share that last holiday of the years. Of course, if it can’t be done, it can’t. I have ordered the gifts I usually buy from Amazon so that will save my daughter some shopping. Nice to at least be able to share notes while being under the weather.

        Reply
        • An annual three month holiday in Costa Rica? Wow – wouldn’t that be fun. But yes, I see wy you need to have Christmas on the traditional day, with so many people to organize. It will still be lovely, even if you can’t get everything done that you’d like to do. Kick back and relax, and don’t’ worry about getting everything made that you wanted to. You can always make the Easter decorations, instead. 🙂

          Reply
    • So sorry to hear of your health issues! While in the hospital, you can be planning all your next sculptures, drawing them out and maybe if you have the energy, start on an armature with tin foil if your son will bring that in for you. Pneumonia is really hard to bounce back from as we age so be careful not to overdo things when you get home! This is coming from a retired RN! I hope you feel better soon. Remember, if you relapse or seem to go backwards, that means you are doing too much. The sculptures will wait! Take care and breathe deeply!

      Reply
      • Thanks, Eileen. I was supposed to go home today, but started feeling worse and coughing a lot again so maybe tomorrow. Haven’t had enough energy except to write a few messages. I really want to try to make some of your little birds and maybe even some smaller ones. Are the bases foil or crumpled paper with masking tape.

        Thanks again for your concern. I have had bouts like this before, but I was much younger then

        Reply
        • So sorry about the slow progress. Frustrating to be sure.
          I used tin foil covered with masking tape for those little birds but crumpled paper would work too and might be lighter in weight. Those would be the perfect sedentary project for when you get home, not too taxing and can be done in stages. Heal well!

          Reply
  4. Here is my latest finished project. Another rhino, for a newborn baby. People seem to love them. (Next to giraffes, they seem to be the most popular.) He is around one foot tall.

    Reply
    • Rex, it’s fantastic! I’ve been looking at a lot of ancient sculptures lately (working on a copy of William, the Egyptian hippo from the Met) and your rhino would fit right in with so many museum pieces. There’s something about the way he’s sculpted and the painted finish that makes him look timeless. What a lucky baby! I hope the parents keep it in a nice safe place so baby can treasure it when he’s a little older.

      Reply
      • It is going to my pharmacist’s sister’s baby. The pharmacist said, “I think I’ll take it home for a few days so it can sit alongside the giraffe for a while.” I wish it didn’t take me to long to get anything finished!

        Thanks, Jonni.

        Reply
          • Yes, Jonni, I think that is true. I made her sculptures for her two babies, but I don’t know if I have time to make another rhino. My list is long at the moment. As it always is. After I get the next four projects finished as gifts, I would really like to make me a chupacabra. (I’ll attach a photo of the one I like. There is a lot of mythology behind these characters. I believe this one was shot (of course) in the Midwest after terrorizing farmers for three years.)

            Reply
            • Hi Rex. I was hoping you’d make one of those after you mentioned it to me a few days ago! I can’t wait to see your interpretation of this beast. The idea of a myth in the making is exciting, don’t you think?

    • Rex, he is beautiful. I love the pose and the way you have structured the body and legs. Do you mention somewhere how the armature is made. A real handsome critter.

      Reply
      • Carrie, thank you. (Maybe you gave me a boost on the cow I’m trying to make! I’ve replaced his ear three times — including scraping off the clay. There ought to be a law.)

        Reply
  5. Here’s the finished piece. It’s made of Latex with a rigid foam backing. It’s set on a piece of resin.

    Reply
  6. Hey Jonni. Here’s a piece I just finished for a good friend of mine. A mother manatee and her calf.

    Reply
    • The dog is beautiful. When you say it was your first job, do you mean you take orders and create these beautiful dogs on commission? They look so real that you really have to look close to see they’re painted, and it isn’t a real dog.

      Reply
  7. Jonni, here is my finished peacock made from wire and polystyrene armature, covered in your clay recipe, painted and feathered. I am pleased with the result. He looks lovely in my Peacock Christmas Tree, positioned in my entrance hall. I hope you like him. 🙂

    Reply
    • He’s outstanding, as all your pieces are, Sarah. Amazing.

      We received another comment this morning on another page about using the original paper mache clay as a coating for foam. He wanted to know if you need a primer over the foam to get the pm clay to stick. I didn’t think it would be needed, but I could be wrong. Do you have some advice for him? And did you use the original mixture or the air dry clay recipe for your peacock?

      Reply
      • Thanks Jonni. I used the original clay recipe not the air-dry for the peacock and just spread it straight onto the polystyrene, pressing firmly. It worked a treat.:)

        Reply
        • By the way, the body is 16″x5″ and from head to end of tail he is 4foot 8″ plus the head plumes. I shaped the neck using tin foil over wire and three layers of PM clay to get the shape just right. I didn’t bother making feet as he is fixed to the branch using two pieces of wire inserted into the foam body. Feet would just get in the way.

          Reply
    • We had peacocks at one time, and if I had something this wonderful, I would have to put up a Christmas tree again. Stunning.

      Reply
    • Just fabulous Sarah! I love all the bling and your idea for a peacock tree is incredible too! Do you have a picture of the entire tree? Well done!

      Reply
      • Thanks everyone for all your lovely comments. Here is the whole tree, although it looks better in real life, I feel. It is one of two main trees which are two of six full-size trees decorated this year. I’m exhausted!

        Reply
  8. I’m at the point where is have to make another batch of clay. Can’t wait to paint him and put the big eyelashes on him. Not sure how to mount him on the wooden plank I purchased. Might want to just hang him without backing. I will soon have a new pet. One I don’t have to feed

    Reply
    • Barbara, Everyone one this site is probably sick of me posting this, but when I make air dry smooth clay, I weigh the ingredients. If you are interested, here is my recipe. When mixing, I add the paper, baby oil, glue, and joint compound first. Then I mix in the corn starch, and finally add in 1/2 cup of flour. I knead it, and mix in as much of the second 1/2 cup as I need. (Usually most or all of it.) Good luck. Hope we get to see what you are doing.

      Air-Dry Smooth Clay

      ½ c toilet paper 24 grams dry, 110 grams wet
      ½ c Elmer’s glue 130 grams
      ½ c joint compound 200 grams (NOT DAP)
      ½ c corn starch 70 grams
      3 T mineral oil (baby oil) 34 grams
      ½ c flour 70 grams
      Knead in up to another ½ c flour to the consistency you like.

      Reply
  9. Used 30mm glass eyes and paper clay to do lids and some bone structure. I’m basically a color and design artist so 3 D is new to me.

    Reply
  10. I’m new here not sure how to work this. I can’t believe how many talented people there r on this site. Makes me feel like I should burn my brushes and all the rest of my equipment. I haven’t paper mache since first grade. I saw this adorable zebra on TV and took a picture of it. I looked to see if I could buy it somewhere but found nothing. So I decided to make it myself. Jonni’s website has been a blessing. Not finished yet had trouble with the air clay. My mixer was really bad. Don’t know how to send pictures of my various steps. I grew up with dolls not computers. If anyone out there can tell me how to post the pics I’d appreciate it

    Reply
    • Hi Barbara. If your images are on a laptop or PC, just click on the Browse button below the text box that you write your comment into. That will let you find the image on your computer. Click on it and hit “Open.” Then hit the “Post Comment” button. If the image is small enough, it should show up under your comment as soon as I’ve had a chance to approve it. The images do need to be fairly small, though. Anything over 250 KB won’t come through.

      Reply
      • Hope u got the pics. Let me know. I made a new batch of clay using equipment that I bought just like yours. What a difference. Show u that u have to have good workable equipment. The clay was much better. It still was a little sticky because I was confused about how much flour. Ur recipe said 1/2 cup to start and then I didn’t know if u added 1/4 cup for a total of 3/4 cup or 1/2 cup to start and another 3/4 cup making it a total of 1 and a 1/4. So my new batch was still not quite right but better than yesterday’s. Have to make more tomorrow because my baby is so big that I still have more area to cover

        Reply
        • Hi Barbara. If your air dry clay is still stickier than you like, you can add more flour. It will still need the glue and water mixture to get it to stick to the dried paper mache, but a stiffer mix is a little easier to use when making fine details like zebra eyelids. I’ll contact you privately to see if I can help with the images.

          Reply
  11. Second papier-mâché sea turtle. This one is approximately 11 inches long. It is just a sculpture not a box

    Reply
  12. I am a volunteer docent and watch over the adorable harbor seals in my area. I decided to make a life-sized harbor seal pup at the weaning stage. Using Joni’s instructions and recipes I came up with this replica of a live pup from this past pupping season. I only have to put the whiskers on and it is done. Thank you Joni. I have done paper mache in the past but your instructions make it so much easier. I plan on making more.

    Reply
      • I had planned on auctioning him off as a fundraiser for a local Marine Mammal rescue center but my husband has fallen in love with him and wants to hang him from our ceiling or build a shelf for him. I guess I will now have to make another one to auction off.

        Reply
        • I can see why he wants to keep him. Careful, though – if you make another one (or two) you could end up with a whole herd of them in your living room. 🙂

          Reply
          • A herd of seals would be interesting indeed! Are they called a herd? Very nice harbor seal, I am not surprised hubby wants to keep it.

            Reply
    • I made a little sea turtle box. It is made from papier-mâché, painted and sealed. It is approximately 4 inches across the inside of the box
      Having fun with papier-mâché thanks to Jonni

      Reply
    • Oh, Kim, that reminds me when I bought a seal statue out of white rock. It is gorgeous. Wish I still had it, but now I guess I could put it on my list of things I would love to make. I’d want to keep it, too. Great.

      Reply
  13. Hello Jonni, here is the ornate halo made from your air-dry clay recipe. I have learned a lot trying this out and next year will make an improved version, but for now I’ve run out of time. I sandwiched a metal wire circlet intersected with a cross between two thin layers of clay and the shape ws cut out with a craft knife. Once dry, I painted it gold using Humbrol metallic paint. I had all sorts of problems with layers separating and warping, which I shall overcome when I do it again. Another enjoyable learning experience and i am pleased with the result. Once dry, the air-dry clay can be carved, which is how I put the detail on. It has huge potential as a carving medium.

    Reply
    • Wow – you are doing so many interesting things with that recipe! The halo is beautiful, of course. And I’m really looking forward to your solution for the warping.

      Reply
      • Thanks, Jonni. I managed to get rid of the warping by using lots of small weights on edges as they were drying. I think that if I wait until the sheet of clay is dry before cutting the shape, I will prevent warping. Cutting it when completely dry will also make it much easier to get lovely smooth edges without having to sand down. I didn’t realise how easily it would cut when dry. It cuts and carves beautifully when dry, using craft blades and wood carving tools. All sorts could be made cutting shapes out of slabs of dry clay, don’t you think?

        Reply
        • Yes, and if it isn’t’ cracking when you carve it, that really opens up a lot of possibilities. On a much smaller scale than the pieces you’re working on, I can imagine a whole Christmas tree decorated with cut-out snow flakes, about three inches across, and each one different. Or larger sculpted wall hangings, shaped and carved. Hmmm…

          Reply
          • No cracking at all. I was only doing very shallow carving , but the halo is double-sided so the detail is seen from the rear too. We have St Joseph positioned on a tall cupboard going up the stairs and he can be seen all round. In some parts, the remaining clay is very thin as it is carved front and back, but still remains crack-free and strong.

            Reply
            • By the way, Jonni, I made the air-dry clay in an old bowl using my food processor. I just threw all the ingredients in and whizzed it to a dough! It’s really handy to have a spare food processor bowl for craft projects. Makes life very easy.

    • Wow, Sarah. I can’t believe what you did. Certainly thinking outside the box. It is gorgeous. I have St. Francis in the front yard (feeding the birds, like someone else did on this site!), and he needs a halo. This is simply one step beyond. Look forward to what you do next. Jonni is right, the possibilities are endless.

      By the way, I also used my food processor to make clay until it broke. It worked great. (Now I weigh the ingredients because that way I can get the same texture of the clay that I prefer.)

      Thank you for sharing this with us. I’m delighted.

      Reply
      • Thank you Rex. Can you share a picture of your St. Francis? I’d love to see it. What is he made of? How big is he? How large would the halo need to be? We have a seated ST Francis bird bath in our garden, but I didn’t make him. However, I did make a mountain of concrete skulls for him to sit on to raise him up higher. The birds love to bathe in the bowl.

        Reply
        • Sarah, here is a photo (finally) of my St. Francis. He is about two feet tall. I tried to figure out what he is made of and found out that he is very light. My first time trying to lift him. I forget who made the wonderful St. Francis on this site, but thanks for the inspiration.

          Reply
  14. Here is this years’ Christmas ornaments that i make for my grandkids and several neighbor children. Their names are on the back, with the year as well. Super easy!

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Heads up! You are attempting to upload an invalid image. If saved, this image will not display with your comment.

Heads up! You are attempting to upload a file that's too large. Please try a smaller file smaller than 250KB.

Note that images greater than 250KB will not be uploaded.