Daily Sculptors Page

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14,826 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Just wanted to share a project my husband I did for our Church’s Annual Trunk or Treat event. We decorated our trunk with the theme “Jurassic Park” Our trunk had a lot of paper mache components but the biggest part of the project was Rex…our T-rex. I just never could have imagined how great he turned out…the kids loved him and kept asking “Is he real!!” This site is an absolute gem…it was a “go to” for questions and inspiration. Thank you Jonni!

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      • Oh boy…this was really kind of a “fly by the seat of my pants” project. I have a few pics of the process. I started with a cardboard armature. I grossly underestimated the weight of the newspaper…Fortunately my hubby came to my rescue and added the internal support to keep him from caving.

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        • How did you come up with the shapes for your armature? Was it all hand-drawn? I know we’ve already taken up a ton of your time, but would you have any interest in writing an actual guest post for the blog to show us how your T-rex was made? It would be seen by a lot more people, and you’d be famous! Well, not really, but this is a fascinating project and I know people would love to see more. But only if you have time. 🙂

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      • We hand cut hundreds of pieces from cereal boxes to make the scales…it was an efficient way to add texture. I adhered them to the piece in a few ways, Elmer’s glue, paper mache and hot glue…it hind sight hot glue was the way to go. I applied a thin coat of dry wall mud over the pieces of cardboard and sanded it smooth.

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  2. Hi I have been looking at video all day not sure if I have seen them all but In one of the video you were talking about wire for starting your work and I have an Idea that might be helpful for some, My day job as they say is handyman were I do every thing from HVAC to Painting. One of the places I do a lot of work for is a mobile home park and when they move a old home out of the park They can not just let everything just stick out of the ground, so they cut everything off at ground level and pitch it in the trash, elic. wire, pluming exe. but know this place saves it for me, elic. wire is works very well for this, it is made out of aluminum and it is not hard to strip the out side coating off. I use it a lot and have had very good lock with. all so in one of the videos you said you would like to know if we had are one art web site it a facebook page david harshman fine arts.

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  3. Hello All,
    This is a picture of the Lilies i made for my restoration of an Victorian statue of St. Joseph. I made them out of Jonni’s air dry clay recipe and had great fun doing them. I cut the shapes out of the clay using scissors as that gives a nice, smooth edge. The statue is nearing completion, just finishing the paintwork, but I couldn’t wait to share the Lily staff with you. I will post a picture of the completed statue when it’s done.

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    • Oh, it’s on its side! The picture was taken with the camera upright and looks correct on my PC. Here’s another taken landscape.

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      • Very nice Sarah! I find flowers very difficult to do. I can never get them thin enough to be believable. I also am curious as to whether you have any support such as wire inside. Nice work and it is sweet to see your enthusiasm.

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        • Thankyou Eileen. Only the leaves have wires. The lilies were supported around cones as they dried. I don’t think I would be able to do a rose, say. The clay would probably be too soft. Unless the petals were left to dry a bit before constructing the flower? I might try just to see. Actually, I have an experiment ongoing – a halo for St Joseph! I have made him a simple wire circlet, but he has two holes for a more interesting design so I am trying to make one in air-dry clay. I shall post the results whatever the outcome. Watch this space…

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    • The lilies are beautiful, Sarah. I’m amazed that you were able to cut the sheets of air dry clay like that – were they supported in any way when you made your cuts?

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      • Thank you Jonni. The clay was rolled out on cornflour ( or cornstarch), and marked using a Wilton Lily sugarpaste cutter. I cut through using scissors and although the clay was a bit floppy, I had no problems. The lilie were shaped around a metal cream horn mould to dry. I supported the curled petals on cling film. The leaves were rolled out with a thin wire support in the centre then the edges cut. The wire enabled me to curl the leaves and supported the shape while drying. Here is a picture of them drying. By the way, the clay was made two weeks ago and is still mould-free. I didn’t use mould inhibitor at all.

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  4. Hi its me again I was going through some of your video’s and you were talking about mixed media so I thought I would let see one I did that was part painting an part papier mache,

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  5. This is my first time to post something here I just found this web page and in joyed seeing everything some very cool things on here, so I thought I would post one.

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    • Rainmund, when I first saw the pig and the fish, I said, aloud, “Who posted my stuff?” !!! I love them. Your dauchsund is wonderful. I like him a lot. You will be so happy by the time you get to the end of Jonni’s book. You can call yourself an artist then (as if you aren’t already). Thanks so much for posting these.

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  6. Hi Jonni,
    I`m from germany and 72 years old. I saw your ineresting videos about making animals.
    I bought your books „Make animal sculptures“ and „Paper mache dogs“.
    At first I made the piglet, then the clown fish and at last the begging dachshund.
    These are my first works with paper mache clay.

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    • Hi Raimund – your sculptures are coming out really nice! Thank you so much for showing them to us. It looks like you’re having a lot of fun with this new art form. You’ve done a very nice job with the painting – have you any painting before?

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  7. These are my latest 2 sculpts i have been working on, by the way Jonni, I love the gratitude project idea, cannot wait to get started on something for this!

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    • That is a huge panda. (All I can see is those toenails because toenails drive me crazy!) Great eyes. The green is unsettling on the pumpkin — great idea. I think I could do cutouts for my larger pumpkins that sit here and there throughout the year. Nice projects.

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      • Rex, do the toenails drive you crazy in a good way or bad? haha. The green in the pumpkin is a light inside. I love your pumpkins!!

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        • Susan, wow, that is a very thin pumpkin. I still like the green light.

          Toenails in general make me crazy because they are difficult for me to do. I admire anyone who even tries them. Almost everything I do has toenails, so it is an endless challenge. Guess I should expand that to feet in general. Thanks.

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            • Rex, oops i sent before i finished, I meant to say the feet are really an issue with me as well, I used an air dry clay called “Hearty” for the nails which made it easier than expected. The clay doesn’t crack when it drys and is super easy to adhere to with glue or pm clay, also not expensive to buy.

            • Susan, I’m eavesdropping on your conversation with Rex. 🙂 We get a lot of questions about what commercial brand of air dry clay people can use that won’t crack when it dries, so I had to go look up the product you mentioned. I found some on Amazon, and it doesn’t seem terribly expensive. In fact, for smaller projects, it would cost less than buying all the separate ingredients of my own air dry clay recipe. Thanks for the recommendation!

            • Thanks, Susan. I’m going to try that. I used SuperSculpty for toenails and teeth on a couple of dinosaurs, and they break really easy. I haven’t had any problems with it in other areas, however. Appreciate the information.

  8. Hi Jonni; im Sebastian. I tried to send an email to tou with a question about the technique, but apparently theres no email. How do i contact you?

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  9. The pumpkin is one I made months ago, and the witch is made from SuperSculpty and painted by Cathy.

    I wanted to post these before Halloween is over. I’m trying to clear off my work table and organize projects so I can get working again. Weather is rapidly turning.

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    • Wonderful! Your neighbors will really like it – do you get a lot of kids for Halloween? And does clearing off your work table mean you’re feeling better now?

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      • Thanks, Jonni. No, we don’t get many kids for Halloween. Last year I think about four! I’m debating about whether to buy one or two bags of candy. One will probably do, but I might need some!

        Yes, I’m feeling better and trying to do something. I hope I can get a few things painted!

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          • Eileen, when I was a senior in high school, I ate about a dozen Reese’s peanut butter cups. I was quite ill. Since then (over 50 years) I can’t eat anything peanut butter and chocolate. So I’ll take this as a Halloween joke! Thanks for the thoughts, though!

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  10. Here is a pumpkin with witches painted on it. It was painted by my neighbor Cathy. As you can tell, she is an awesome artist.

    I forget what the pumpkin was originally was, but it was broken. I put paper mache clay over it, and Cathy painted it. I will post a few photos because every witch is worth seeing.

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  11. Hi everyone. I’ve just finished my first papermache nativity scene and want to share it with you. Forgot to take a selfie hand next to the piece but… i guess most of you already know that my dolls are mostly miniatures
    I’m planning to start a video channel on vimeo with it and for youtube there’s some thoughts of making a video about how to construct a papermache crib for Jesus
    Thanks 🙂

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    • Oh Pedro, that is just fabulous! So how big is this miniature? I love it and I am looking forward to your videos.

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      • Thank you both!
        I guess I should have taken the photo with my hand “on it”, totally forgot 🙁 BUT I can post one with the middle process if one considers that Joseph is only half made as I first thought on portraying him on his knees too …
        I think that overall the piece might have around 5,1inches tall and 7,8inches wide (according to google cm to inches translator). The base is just a sheet of cardboard covered with strips of paper nd glue so didn’t “caused” much height … 🙂
        Regarding hands they really are my “Achilles heel” , should spend days and days drawing them in order to make them a bit better, modeling wise 🙂 🙂

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        • The hands are excellent, I think. Hands are notoriously difficult to model,even more so in miniature! I am restoring a very old plaster statue of St. Joseph at the moment. It stands 85cm high. It is mainly a paint job, but the hand holding the lily staff is broken and I will need to model some new fingers. The statue is really beautifully modelled and is Victorian. I have had to completely strip off the old paint, badly flaked in most areas and will re-paint in the old colours, dark and rich.

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            • I think so. I forgot to say I also have to make the Lily staff. I have a bamboo garden stake which will fit nicely and I thought the air-dry clay would be good for the lilies and leaves and to make the staff look like a branch not bamboo. It will be my first foray into Jonni’s clay recipe. I’m looking forward to it.

    • Pedro, I love your artistic works. (I was in the store yesterday and asked them why the door to the Christmas supplies was shut. The guy behind me said, “For crying out loud, it’s not even Halloween yet!” The clerk said, “All you have to do is open the door.” That’s how my days go!)

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      • Hi Rex 🙂
        Well he’s right in a way inst he? But also sounds like he doesn’t really need to sell in order to live / survive just any other “common mortal” these days, eh eh eh

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  12. This bear was made by Joseph Kesling, one of our readers. He made it using the bear pattern on this site, put all the pieces together, and added paper mache. Then he added faux fur so he could use it as the head on a fake bear rug. After all his work, it came out really nice!

    paper mache bear head with faux fur

    Paper mache bear head using pattern from ultimatepapermache.com

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  13. Hi Jonni. I haven’t done much in the way of mache this summer as we did more traveling than we usually do and I had a contractor in to create a new work studio for me. It is an amazing room and I now spend a lot of time in there. It is also nice now to be home and enjoying a wonderful fall in Nova Scotia. I created this duo as gifts for rug makers down in Vermont. I liked them so much I didn’t want to give them away. I have decided that I will make a couple for myself to go with my Christmas decorations this year. I don’t think I posted these already and if I did just delete this post.

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      • Yes I delivered them in Sept. They loved them and used them in a display at Amy’s rug school. The Oxford Rug Hooking School. It was nice to see them on the table at the entrance welcoming people to the school and shop.

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      • Thank you Eileen. I was looking for something that would be flat and even. The golf tees worked really well.

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    • Diann, I don’t know how one can get much better than that — even if you hate sheep! They are simply wonderful. That is a great talent. (How many ways can one say that?)

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      • Thank you Rex. I have a couple of people wanting sheep so I think I will start a couple tomorrow. I hope you are feeling better and we will see some of your great talent soon.

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