Daily Sculptors Page

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14,802 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Here is the koi. I will try and create a “how to” if I make another one. I am very fond of koi because we had a 9,000 gallon pond with 62 koi over two feet long. One winter when it got -50, they all died. It was a horror. Anyway, this is one of the Sanke we had.

    For those of you who remember the autistic kid (11 years old) that I gave the penguins to, along with the egg, which eventually hatched — this is for him. His mother tried to put away the hatched penguin because he was holding a heart, but he wasn’t hearing of it. Good kid! I sent him a fish egg last week, and this week he is getting the koi. He sent me a note last week about the egg saying, “I hope it hatches soon.” Thanks.

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      • I asked his grandmother if he knew what kind of fish it was, and she said no. I like that. What inspired this was a group of schools took the kids fishing. He caught two fish but is devastated that they died (and are in the freezer). He won’t let his mom throw them out. I hope with this new fish, he can let the others go. Thanks.

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    • What a sweetie you are! I am sure this koi will have a loving home with your little friend. Sorry to hear of the loss of all your koi, it must have been devastating. The opposite happened to us. We had a 50 gallon fresh water fish tank which my brother in law was minding while we were on our honeymoon(34 yrs ago). He accidentally bumped the heater which then turned up….all the fish got fried. We were heartbroken as half of them were raised from when they were born. I still remember the feeling.

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      • He is so excited for the fish to “hatch.” I think we now have a history going on! Anything I make for him, I’ll have to make an egg first!

        That is horrible about your fish. I know it doesn’t take much to put them in danger. (I had three tanks at one time – one saltwater.) Anyway, here is a photo of the pond. I managed to find those photos. I think I have photos of every type of koi.

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        • And I can’t help but post this photo I found of the koi splashing and Loki on guard. My Little Angel. To the day he died, he was very cautious around water.

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          • Rex, that is a beautiful and heartbreaking photo with little Loki looking on. And the koi are almost as gorgeous as your sculpture. Thank you so much for the pix.

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            • Loki has been dead almost a year — next week. He touched everything I did for so long, and I don’t take a step but what I miss him. It is like when I would watch a video of Jonni’s and you expect at any moment that her cat is going to get in the game. Little critters steal your heart.

    • Rex, the pond was in the yard where you lived at some point? 62 large koi? Did I read that right? That must have been incredible to see. That they all died is heartbreaking.
      The koi sculpture is gorgeous. Your young friend is really fortunate to have someone so wonderfully clever and artistic in his life. Can’t wait to hear his reaction.

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      • Shelbot, Yes. This photo shows the pond. There is another 3,000 gallons off to the left. The shack with the WATERCOLOR on the front of it was the pump house. (Actually survived a couple of years.)The bridge led right to the front door where Loki and I lived. We called it the shed. The only way out of our house was to walk over the pond, so you can imagine how much we missed it.

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        • This was our back yard. It is difficult to see the pond. My cousin was kind enough to let me build a shack in her back yard, where we lived for eight years. Thank you for your kind comments. If you get the urge to make a koi, I have many photos!

          I will probably hear about the fish tonight or tomorrow. I’ll let you know.

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    • Wow this is beautiful. I love the fish’s mouth and his whole shape. The paint job is great. Just perfect. It’s a great idea photographing with a water background (not sure what that is; cloth or painted?) but I always love to photograph my objects in their natural environment too. The story of the penguins and hatched eggs sounds fun. I’ll have to scroll down to history posts to find that stuff I guess. Very nice that you’re making a child happy with your creations.

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      • Thanks, Vicki. It is the small penguin holding a heart, so around Valentine’s Day — if that helps. The background is actually a pillow case my brother made me! lol

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        • Rex, I found the photo. I hope you don’t mind me copying it here so Vicki won’t have to search for it. I forgot how it was holding the heart, so it was fun for me to see it again, too.

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          • Oh, thanks, Jonni. I forgot that part of the valentine was in its mouth! I would have sworn it was tucked under the wing. Just shows you what I know. I’m so glad he didn’t let his mother put it away with valentine stuff!

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            • Rex, I couldn’t remember that your little penguin was carrying the Valentine in his mouth either. Really cute. Good to see him again.
              Thanks, Jonni!

          • Ahh that’s sweet of you Jonni that you found it for me. This is charming! I love the heart idea. How cute. One thing I don’t understand, being gone from back home (USA) almost 30 years, I’m not up on all trends. I wasn’t sure what the deal about an egg hatching is. Through facebook I know from my niece in Indiana that there was something on the market for kids where an egg eventually hatched. I can’t even imagine HOW? So I’m kind of confused about how your egg with the penguin inside it, hatched? Did you make it like out of paper maché, and then ask the kid’s mother to eventually cut it open without the child knowing and he thought it hatched? haha Sorry for being so naive about this, but if it wasn’t for facebook, I wouldn’t even know of the hatchacallits, whatchacallits. hehe

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    • The young man wrote me a note today thanking me for the koi. He made me laugh with his comment that he hope the penguins don’t eat the koi. What a kid, and what an imagination.

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        • I have had many a chuckle over that kid. What an imagination. I ought to make him a shark, and then a worm — you get the idea. Plankton!

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          • LOL. Actually, I’d like very much to see you do that, Rex : ) But I am already exhausted by the incredible amount of awesome art pieces you do make. Don’t stop, though.

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    • I absolutely love this, fantastic sculpture!! I l ways wanted a koi pond but was afraid I would do something wrong . Great job!!!!!!!

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      • Susan, I can almost guarantee you would have done something wrong! (Positive, eh?) The pond was a lot of work, and getting the waterfall to flow wasn’t the difficult part. There were constant battles for a number of years, but we learned a lot. Algae, disease, cleaning, pump (we eventually buried it in lava rock to help keep the water clean), and three years into it we built a plant pond to filter the water. Also, the second pond, where the plants cleaned the water, was a place to put the koi while we cleaned the pond. I loved it. Thanks.

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  2. Hi Jonni. You asked about my bees. I didn’t see a reply button so I hope this is ok starting a new thread, for a new project. A few years ago a bee keeper asked me to make him a giant bee. His bee farmer friends liked it so much I ended up making 3 of them for his friends. They’re about the size of a normal sized cat. They’re all paper maché except for their wings which are made of stabile see through plastic with markings just drawn on with a magic marker.

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      • Thanks Jonni. His friends were all people in his society of bee keepers. One has a bee Museum so one of my pieces has the honor to be displayed in a glass case for people to see details of a bee since I tried to keep them true to life. I made their bodies using a plastic bread sack and stuffing them with newspaper to get the egg shapes. I made their legs using wire and then padding them with paper maché. The wings are cut out of hard plastic and lines drawn on with water proof marker. Here’s a pic of one in the making.

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        • I realized that this photo shows my first bee. His wings weren’t correct so I improved them on the next bees. It seems that every first piece I make has some kind of mistake so each first piece is more or less an experiment. Then I improve it. Here’s a pic with the improved wings.

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          • Rex, here’s another in-the-process pic of my bee. I do have step by step pics of most of my projects but there’s no space here in our Daily Sculptor’s Page to insert so many photos or do a real How-To. Maybe this pic gives a general idea of how I made the bee’s shape anyway. I just used plastic bags from bread sacks to make the body form, stuffed with newspaper. I use this method a lot, because when finished if you want you can remove the innards and the plastic bag comes out with it. With the bees I left all the innards to give them a little weight. I already mentioned how I made the legs, using wire and just padding them with paper mache. Hopes this gives a general idea.

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      • Vicki, I don’t know who began the joke, but I tell Jonni I have to make five of anything before I make a real sculpture. You’re five steps ahead of me! I really love these bees.

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    • Vicki, these are so cute. I want a bunch. Can’t you tell us or show us how you did them. One of my favorite things ever. The bees and I have a very good relationship in my garden. How did you do those legs and everything???

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    • Wow! Fabulous bees Vicki, and as one who is a bit afraid of bees, they are a bit scary. I shouldn’t be afraid of bees, but of yellow jackets as I stepped in a nest when I was a child. I love all the pollen on their backs, it makes them look very realistic. In the states, there has been a real problem of hive collapse and we are losing massive numbers of honey bees. Is that a problem in Germany?

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      • Yes Eileen it’s a problem here in Germany too. Environmentalists are taking lots of precautious steps to preserve the bees. It’s a major problem and I do hope we all wake up and start loving our mother earth and protecting her. I do my part by leaving the dandylions in the garden in early spring for them to pollinate. If I see a bee trapped in the house or somewhere I try to save it. Not sure what else we can do but I’m sure there are things we could all do to protect our bees if we want to. I understand why you’re slightly afraid of them but really no need to be. For me, it’s spiders. But I still make them out of paper maché even with my arachnaphobia. Go figure.

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    • Vicki, your bees are beeautiful (sorry). I think they’d be awesome in any size, but they are as large as a cat!? I want. Thank you for showing us! That picture is wonderful.

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      • Shelbot, yes I made 5 bees in all. After selling 4 of them I wanted one for myself. He was the biggest of them all and is as big as a cat, yep. I’ll try to find a pic to show you his size. Here he is on my outdoor balcony round table for two. He takes up the whole table top. With his shape I think he looks more like a hornet. I want to make some more that look more like honey bees.

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        • Vicki, why must you torment me with your incredible bees? Even if you think he looks more like a hornet, he is glorious. And seriously, more bees, please. Have you ever made a figeater beetle? I’d sure like to see that. Well, I’d like to see anything/everything you make.

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          • Already very happy to have found this thread on how to make some bees: I’m going to need a lot of them for a project in the coming half year! You make my life easier!

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  3. I wasn’t sure which project I should share first. Being new here I figured I should share something to introduce myself. I picked one of my favorite projects from last year when I had Alice in Wonderland as my theme for Halloween which I host every year for children in my village. My life size Mad Hatter turned out pretty well but you will notice that I really need help in learning how to sculpt faces to make them realistic. This is one of the main subjects I’m hoping to learn here in Jonni’s world of paper mache. I already found a video that is very helpful for this subject.

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    • Vicki, I think it’s fantastic just the way it is. I don’t suppose you took progress photos, did you? If you feel inspired to write up a guest post/tutorial showing us how you make your figure sculptures, I know we’d all love to see your process. If that sounds like fun, just let me know. 🙂

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      • Vicki, Is he really all paper mache? I think he is fantastic and as for his face, well, he is a Mad Hatter after all. If you have a close up shot of his face, could you post? But it is a terrific sculpt, in any event. Does he live in your house?

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        • Thanks so much Shelbot. Yes he is all paper mache. His clothes are made from whole newspaper pages. His head was a styrofoam wig head to start with then paper mache over it. His body parts, hands, legs, thimbles, teapot, lace on his jacket, just everything is paper mache. Not shown on the original pic is a belt of colored threads around his shoulder that are real thread. That’s the only accessory that is not paper mache, and the feather on his hat. Yes he sits in my little workshop room corner for now until I someday get an Atelier or Showroom. I’ll show you a close-up of his face which I am not satisfied with. I really want to learn how to make true to life faces.

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          • Vicki, did you see my Halloween portrait mask and the Wicked Witch of the West? If so, you’ll notice that I “cheated” and used a plastic skull as the base of the sculpt. It gives you a nice head start. But if you really want to learn to make realistic portrait sculptures, I suggest Adam Reeder’s CD. He is a great teacher, and he doesn’t overwhelm you with names of facial muscles or artsy terms. He just shows you an easy way to make a sculpture that really looks like the person it’s supposed to represent. He starts with the silhouette, just like we do when we make patterns for our animal sculptures. I’ve never seen anyone else doing it this way, but it works – and I recommend it every chance I get.

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            • Yes I did see that Jonni! And I thought it was a great idea. I already took over the idea for next time I make a face and a head. I thought the idea was ingenius because after all, I mean, every human face has a skull underneath for the basic shape. hehe Ingenius. I would’ve never thought of it. Til now I had been using wig heads that are just round, then I have to sculpt a face onto it. OK I’ll check into the CD you mentioned. Sounds intriguing. Maybe that in addition to your idea of using a plastic skull will get me on the right path. I just don’t want my faces to look so amateur. Thanks.

          • Vicki, Thank you so much for the close up & the other picture. I think that he just gets better & better, but I understand your wanting to be able to sculpt more realistic faces. I’m sure you know that some people measure everything. I don’t have the patience or discipline. The most important features to me are the eyes and for the MH yours work. Are you concerned only with shaping the face or also painting? I think a lot of people just stop before they are “done”. You’ve probably surpassed these tips, but maybe they’ll help someone.
            https://www.craftsy.com/blog/2015/02/how-to-paint-eyes/

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            • Oh thanks Jonni and Shelbot for the video. I’m going to check it out right now. Thanksk also for the craftsy blog link. I’m concerned about the shape of the face mostly, sculpting it correctly. I mean when I see Jonni’s video of her Witch and portrait mask, WOW she’s light years ahead of me on “sculpting”. That’s what I need to learn is sculpting. Not so much painting or drawing eyes. The whole face shape of my Mad Hatter is so “grade school” level in my eyes. I just never learned how to sculpt faces; noses, eyes, cheeks, chins. This is so much fun having real conversations (well cyber conversations) with other real, paper mache, artists! I’ve been so alone with my hurdles and problems til now. OK once I make progress you guys are going to be the first to witness it.

            • I just watched the video from Adam Reeder. Wow thanks that is really helpful. I would love to buy the CD but for the time being can’t afford it. That’s why this video is a free treat!! I think my basic problem is I’m using the wrong materials. I need to learn how to make clay. You can’t sculpt real life faces very well with pure paper mache. I think it’s time for me to dip into “mixed media”. I think I’m going to browse through Jonni’s site and pick all the flowers along the path, maybe buy a few books from her. I think my art library is begging for Jonni’s presence in my art space in some form or another. hehe Well hers, and all of yours, presence is already here in my creative life. Just knowing someone is there who shares the same passion and is so willing to share “secrets” is a special treat.

            • Hi Vicki. I think my books would look lovely on your book shelves. 🙂

              By the way, I just followed the link to your site – those pumpkins are impressive, but the bees really caught my attention. Are those paper mache, too? How big are they?

      • Vicki- I agree with Jonni- it is fabulous as it is! You did a fine job on his face, and as he was somewhat a crazed character, you captures that beautifully! Are those real clothes he is wearing or did you fashion them out of paper? Tell us also how the children responded to him? Did they try to climb on him? Wonderful job and welcome to the site!

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        • Thanks a lot Eileen. Yes like I answered Shelbot even the clothes are made of newspaper and paper mache. Yes his face looks dazed or crazed indeed, thanks for your comment. But I’m still so dissatisfied with the results. Learning by doing and always trying to improve. I’m sure I’ll improve his face once I learn how to do it! I’ve found out after living here in Germany 30 years that children here are in general more well behaved than the ones I knew in USA, where I lived til 1988. The children did not try to climb on him at all. They just stand sweetly in front of him and admire him. Some did ask if they could wear his hat but they would never think of just grabbing the hat. Of course there’s always an exception to the rule with children but I have good experience here with all ages. Here’s a picture for you of two little girls having a tea party with him at the Halloween location.

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    • Vicki, what you have done is wonderful, creative, and witty. I think you must be very young with a lot of energy — all of that paper mache. That is amazing. It’s overwhelming the amount of work. Thanks for showing us.

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      • Rex, this comment made me chuckle in a happy way. Young with lots of energy, the energy part fits but young is relative. Do people tell their ages on here? I don’t mind, I’m 58. I think I’m in the phase of life where I don’t have to prove anything any more, nor look like a model, so now I can just dip my hands into my paper maché, create and be happy! hehe A lot of people here are astounded with my energy, when they see how I load my car up 6 times to transfer all my stuff to our village community activity room for Halloween for the kids. They all ask me where I get the energy, true. It’s all creative energy. 🙂

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    • Wow – that is amazing work on that site. They seem to take paper mache much more seriously in France than here in the US. And, of course, they spell it correctly, and I obviously don’t. (It always seemed strange to use the French spelling when that’s not how we pronounce it.) Thanks for sharing the link.

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      • The German word for paper mache is kind of fun too, Pappmaché. Yes these pieces are really inspirational. I love the rabbit myself being such an Alice in Wonderland fan. But many of these pieces gave me some inspiration and new ideas. I mean lighting up a piece is a cool idea. I’m glad you shared it Joyce.

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        • Vicki, I’m pleased that you liked the site and the rabbit is one of my favourites too. Have you seen Jonni’s little rabbit? It is a gem! Your Mad Hatter is awesome just as he is. I can’t believe how you and others can make something this big and beautiful.
          If I had a creation like that in my home, my grown up son and daughter would have to move out.

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          • Do you mean Jonni’s mini rabbit? Yes it’s so charming. I made a small rabbit for my Alice in Wonderland scene but I still want to make a human life size rabbit sitting at the table with the Mad Hatter. The little one was just for practice for the big one. Thanks for your comment about my Mad Hatter. Well if you can make something small, you can also make something big. I don’t have much room in my small home either, but I also don’t have any teenagers. Just a hubby and a little doggy. hehe But I do have a storage shed for all my big pieces, like my life size Prof. Dumbledore and Dobby among others. But I’m dreaming of finding an Atelier or Showroom so they don’t just stand around collecting cob webs. One step at a time. Here’s my little rabbit for my Alice scene.

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            • Vicki, your rabbit is amazing and charming. I haven’t made anything from paper mâché just polymer and air dry clay. I am one of those “jack of all trades, master of none” people. I have gone from sewing (clothes, quilts, dolls) to painting, sculpting, digital art, etc. Lately I spend a lot of time on my iPad and I am currently trying to learn art programs on it. Do you have any pics of your other creations. I do hope you find a place to display them.

            • Vicki, I’m glad I’m almost done with the clay on my rabbit or this little creature may have stopped me in my tracks from intimidation. Wonderful and creative. I love his big ears, hands, feet, everything. I may have to hold a grudge for a day or so! It just amazes me what people can do. (I’m 71, by the way!)

              I’ll post a photo of my rabbit here. Any suggestions? Just plain ordinary guy! Thanks.

            • Rex, you’ve done a wonderful job with the structure of your rabbit’s head – I can tell already that he’s going to have a great personality when he’s done. I can’t wait to see how it turns out.

            • Rex, I love your rabbit! I agree with Jonni, the structure of his head is great. I chuckled out loud at his sight, that’s how cute he is. No, no reason for intimidation! My rabbit just has extra long ears and all the features exaggerated, because he’s part of an Alice in Wonderland Scene and I want everything to be like a cartoon. Yours is more true to life. I do see through your rabbit and so many projects on here, that it is a MUST for me to learn how to work with this clay. It must be amazing and fun to work with. I just can’t wait to get started. Your rabbit inspires me even more. Can’t wait to see it when finished. Glad we both told our secrets here on an open forum (our ages), hehe. We’re brave souls.

            • Vicki, I almost attempted to re-post your rabbit at the top of the new page because I’m not sure how many people would see it here. I was just scrolling and lucked into him. He is a wonderful character and I’d like everyone to see him. Of course I always wish people could reply to a post AND post at the top. Oh, well… But he’s really cool.

            • Rex, your rabbit; may I have him please? You will notice that I asked very nicely. If he’s this good now, I can’t wait to see him finished. Just fantastic work!

    • He’s beautiful, as are all the rest of your menagerie. Have you considered showing them at a local art center, or maybe the zoo? People would love to see them up close, I’m sure. What an accomplishment, to have made so many – and they’re all turning out so well!

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      • Thanks Jonni , I have been told I should donate one of them to the zoo, it would be hard to part with one, it is like they become part of the family, i know i am crazy. I also do not know how I would get them anywhere because of there size. Congratulations on your incredible website and beautiful prints, I would love every one of them to fill my walls!!

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        • If you allow them to go live somewhere else, why not sell it instead? Or keep them all – which would be much better.

          And shipping – even across town, is definitely not easy. The largest sculpture I’ve ever moved was my baby elephant, and it’s only 30″ tall. Building the crate and getting it padded enough to keep the sculpture from moving was not easy, and most of your sculptures are much larger, so you have an excellent excuse for keeping them. Of course, if the zoo decides to commission work from you, at a fair price, maybe you could build their zebra in a spare room on their grounds. It would be kind of fun if people could watch you make one of these critters. In fact, if you ever decide to make a video showing us how you make them, I’m pretty sure everyone who comes to this blog would love to see it. 🙂

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      • Okay, Susan, I’m coming to live at your house. Don’t blame me, it is your fault for continuing to make these AWESOME, AMAZING animals. As Jonni said, I want to see them close up. Please have cake. Thank you.

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        • Susan, I did not know that Rex would be living with us, but we will make it work. All kidding aside, your animals are incredible and they really should be on display somewhere as Jonni said.

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          • Susan, I’m sorry. I see that you’ve already discussed how it would be difficult to transport them & as difficult, if not more, to part with them. Forgive me if you’ve already told us also, but have you and your sculptures been in a local newspaper or anything? Should be.

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            • On the other hand, Susan’s sculptures have probably already been seen by a lot of people, because she’s shown us the photos on this blog. Maybe more people than would see them at the zoo. 🙂

            • Jonni, that’s an excellent point, of course. Tons of people certainly love you and UPM. But I wouldn’t want anyone to be deprived of seeing Susan’s fantastic sculptures (or yours), and since I’m sure that you and UPM would be mentioned, even more people would be aware that this wonderful site exists.

            • Thanks Rex, we have plenty room here, if you don’t mind sleeping amongst the animals, haha. I did find the stripes very challenging, I am not very confident with my painting skills

            • Thank you Shelbot, Your cake is awaiting you? The only time my sculptures have been seen is when I put the wolf at my front door and of course on Jonni’s fantastic website which I am so thankful for.

    • Ah, Susan. Can I just come live with you. I will sleep on the floor! That zebra is an awesome addition. These are just my favorites. Aren’t you just happy all the time having these guys around. Thanks for showing us. Absolutely love it. I love your painting of the stripes. Great.

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    • Susan your menagerie are beautiful and that zebra is stunning. I can see how you can get attached to your sculptures, but I know you will make another big one, where are you going to put it? I know you have vaulted ceilings, so the giraffe has plenty of room but how about the square footage in your living room? Your talent is amazing. It is interesting that all of the sculptures look like they belong in a good African theme .

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      • Thanks Christine, not sure of square footage, will have to get rid of some furniture if I continue this size, it’s funny they always start out smaller in my head

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    • Susan, they are absolutely beautiful! I can’t even imagine making something that big let alone the painting skill that is necessary to create such awesome creatures. Thanks so much for sharing.

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    • These animals are gorgeous. The giraffe is just the icing on the cake! I agree with Jonni, the best option is to keep the family together. For one thing it looks like your house has a ceiling high enough to house your giraffe and that must be the coolest conversation piece in a house like that. I mean they just seem to fit in this room. I would keep them here all the time. You can’t get any better home decoration than that! Of course sharing the pleasure of them with a zoo is an option. Or if you’re feeling inspired enough to make a whole new giraffe or other animal for the zoo, I agree people would love watching you do it right on their grounds. Many possibilities.

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  4. With the big ransomware crisis in Europe and Asia (not here yet, knock on wood), it almost looks like I was psychic when I wrote my first novel. Small town artist caught up in a murder investigation during an international banking crisis caused by, (yes, really), a computer worm. Is it spammy if I put a link to that light-hearted mystery about murder and international mayhem here on my own blog?

    –I’m not trying to make light of the problems the hackers are causing, though – and I do hope you have all updated your Windows operating system. I read that a young computer geek expert found a way to slow down the movement of the virus to keep it out of the US temporarily, but you do need to have the latest security patch on your computer. Seriously, you really don’t want to put it off.

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      • Sadly, I finally figured out how to market fiction way after writing the first two books. Since nobody can find them, nobody reads them, and it makes the writing of them much less fun. Maybe when I officially ‘retire,’ I’ll write a few more for fun. I miss those characters, too – I do have to wonder what the conversations at Angie’s Diner would have been like during the last election. 🙂

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        • I have eaten out once in the past six years, but I think I would have to make my way down to Angie’s Diner. Would Teca have to stay outside? (Just a little backdrop information.) Oh, funny.

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  5. Okay. My latest rhino. Not my favorite, but . . .

    (Working on a koi — interlude from the jackrabbit — which ought to be finished soon. It is so much fun. Thanks, Jonni)

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    • Great rhino, Rex. Very nice variations in the colors on the coat and horn. Now I’m wondering why I think he (she?) has an interesting secret, but won’t tell? Something about the eye, I think. You’ve caught an interesting personality, and the movement is very realistic. Once again, nicely done!

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      • Rex, I agree with Jonni. This is a great piece. When I search the interwebs : ) for pix of art that I love, I look for images of exciting Ooak sculptures, like your rhino. But, of course, your pieces are always unique and never disappoint.

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    • I love the rhino. I agree he has a secret or something mystical about him. His pose and movement just seems to flow, to be real. I mean it makes him alive. Love it. I think the paint job is wonderful. I love his eyes, very well done. All of it actually, the hooves are nice color and the horns and especially the bit of white around his mouth highlights a little a gives some lightness in the otherwise dark colors of the rhino. I like his little tail, hehe. Would love to see the back view of it. I know it’s hard to show a piece in its entirety in just one shot.

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      • Vicki, Thank you very much for your comments. Here is a bum shot! I was not feeling very confident about this one, so your detailed comments were very much appreciated. Appreciate it. (Glad you liked the docked tail!!!)

        I had many glazes over this thing I began to lose confidence. I knew an oil painter who painted using glazes, and it was incredible what she could paint.

        By the way, if anyone should want a pattern that I’ve made, I’ll be happy to share. I have a case here full (and labeled!) of patterns of almost everything I’ve ever made.

        Thanks again, Vicki

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        • Rex, ahhh thanks for the bum shot! hehe Lovely. I love his cute little tail. And the paint job. Very good indeed. I know you said this is not one of your favorites, but it’s really nice. I don’t know all of your works, but I have a feeling that in time, I will get to know them all. No worry, this one is really nice.

          Reply
          • Vicki, thanks for the comment and the chuckle. I don’t know if even I can remember everything I’ve made, but I will show you the first two pigs I ever did. The “John Deere” pig was for a cousin’s baby, and the “Aquarium” pig was the second one I made for his sister. They were made using balloons and paper strips. If only I had known where they were leading — to Jonni. Thanks again.

            Reply
            • Oh, and I might add they were made with balloons, cups for the noses, and toilet paper rolls for the legs!

            • Rex, I know what you mean. I’ve made so many things I almost forget what all I’ve made if not for keeping photos of them all. Some are give-aways, some I keep for my own displays. Sounds like you like to give your things away to make someone happy. I love the cute little pigs. Funny that you used toilet paper rolls for the legs. I save toilet paper rolls and use them for all kinds of things. My friends even save them for me so I have a lot of toilet paper rolls in storage! I’m thinking your pigs could also be used as a piggy bank by just cutting a slit in the top. This would bel a great project to do with children because of its simple shape/form and the idea of the toilet paper rolls and the cups. I love to use common items to recycle. I mak a little project with children each summer during the Summer Vacation period. This year we’re making ice cream cones. Maybe we’ll make your pigs one year if you don’t mind. It’s nice to see that you also did something with the paper strips and mache. That’s all I do, all I ever work with. But that is about to change thanks to Jonni and the people on this site!

  6. Hi all!

    My name is Joanne, and I am a Year 10 student from Queensland, Australia. At the moment I am undertaking what is known as the MYM Personal Project, a 9-month assignment focused on students’ passions and interests. I have chosen to make a life-size paper mâché sculpture for my project. My sculpture is of two soldiers, male and female, different races, joining together to promote multiculturalism to my local community. So far, the majority is finished, I am simply working on some smaller details, as well as thinking about how to colour my figures. (I would prefer not to paint). I would love it if I could have some advice on what to change, or input on what I am doing well, or what I could be doing in the final stages of this project!

    Thank you! 🙂

    Reply
    • Wow, Joanne. I admire that so much. I wish I had many words of wisdom to give you, but the figures look great to me. I like your ideas.

      If you end up painting them, one artist that demonstrated how to make skin tones actually painted the acrylic on his hand and you could immediately see what direction the color needed to go. He used Cad Red, Cad Yellow, and Ultramarine Blue.

      Really awesome. Please show us more photos as you go along.

      Reply
      • Hi!
        I did look at some pieces done with tissue paper, and I think the idea is brilliant, but I probably still would need to paint some features, to make them more detailed! Thank you so much for the ideas!

        Reply
    • Very nice Joanne! You could finish with tissue paper like some others have suggested, or just use newsprint with appropriate headlines as well. You could also spray paint the whole thing with bronze colored spray paint and it would look like a bronze sculpture. Make sure you show us the end product!

      Reply
      • Thank you so much for your advice! And I will be sure to post a picture of my final piece, which should hopefully be done in the near future 🙂

        Reply
    • Hi Joanne. I think they’re excellent so far. I love your idea and your message. I’m just wondering how will you show that they’re different races if you don’t want to use color? I was just thinking that if one had a different skin color than the other it would be an optical hint to the viewer that they’re two different races. But then again you probably have your own ideas about that. One crazy idea would be, for example, if the man is say from USA. You could show what race he is by paper machéing him on the last coating with headlines from the newspapers pertaining to USA. An American flag would be one visual hint, then everyone would know his nationality. So far the feeling of them uniting comes across very well with their hands together. Great! Him being wounded is a great message. What if the girl is from Australia, your own country. Just a few ideas. I think you’re doing a fabulous job. Hope we get to see the finished product.

      Reply
      • I just had another idea relating to Shelbot’s great advice to check out Artist Sue McLearie’s dogs that are not using color, just paper. I was thinking something along those lines, like for example, making the soldier a uniform just using headlines from his country. Or just dark print or just something to give the look of a soldier’s uniform like the camouflage look. This could make your sculpture even more amazing in my opinion, than just color. It’s an added artistic skill, I mean actually creating details using just paper. WOW I’m amazed over the link to Sue McLearie’s site. I’m sure you can find some inspiration from her way of papermacheing. Hope this brainstorming helps get your creative juices flowing.

        Reply
      • Hi Vicki!

        I have actually started adding colour to the sculptures (I feel they would be dull without), I just preferred not to use paint on them (haha that would probably be a disaster 🙂 Anyway, I LOVE YOUR IDEA! I was having some trouble (even with using colour) emphasising that my soldiers were from different races, but I think the message could be made much more clear by emphasising different nationalities by somehow incorporating different flags in their uniforms! I think the message will be even more effective if I include multiple nationalities rather than just two races! Thank you so much for your advice!

        Reply
        • I just keep thinking about your figures and wonder how you get the proportions so nice. The tissue use sounds intriguing.

          Reply
        • Hi Joanne, I’m so glad you liked my idea about the flags. I am really intrigued by your project and I think it has so much potential. I am really curious to see what you do with it, as I think many on this forum are. Keep us up to date. Keep the creative energies flowing!

          Reply
  7. Hi all!

    My name is Joanne, and I am a student in Year 10. At the moment I am undertaking what is known as the MYM Personal Project, a huge 9-month assignment that is focused on our passions. I have chosen to make a life-size paper mâché sculpture for my project. My sculpture is of two soldiers, male and female, different races, joining together to promote multiculturalism to my local community. So far, the majority is finished, I am simply working on some smaller details, as well as thinking about how to colour my figures. (I would prefer not to paint). I would love it if I could have some advice on what to change, or input on what I am doing well, or what I could be doing in the final stages of this project!

    Thank you! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Hi all!

    My name is Joanne, and I am a student in Year 10 working on my MYM Personal Project! It is a huge 9 month project all of us doing the IB have to take, and my chosen project is a life-size paper mâché sculpture! It is of two soldiers, male and female, different races, joining together to promote multiculturalism to my local community. I would love it if I could have any advice or input into anything I can change to make the sculpture more realistic or appealing, or even any ideas on how to finish the sculpture off and bring more colour to it! At the moment I am working on smaller details and thinking about how to colour my figures (I would prefer not to paint). It would be great to hear what you think of the sculpture so far, as well! 🙂

    Reply
    • Joanne, your image didn’t come through, because the file was too large. I hope you’ll try again – I’ve seen your sculpture, and I know my readers will enjoy seeing it. They might even have some good ideas for you. 🙂

      Reply
    • Hi Joanne, my painting skills are not anything to brag about. In a lot of ways it has been my bane and many of my projects end up lasting years before they are finished. Jonni suggested that I use colored tissue wrapping paper and I have found out that I like doing it. This bowl was an experiment in folding cardboard to make a nice round bowl. Well, it turned out roundish but it turned out into a bowl. I experimented on painting the bowl with gold, red and pink, I do not have a photo of it, but I can tell you it looked horrendous. It stayed that way for years till I decided to do some thing about it. I used the colored tissue Wrapping paper and this was the result. I intend to experiment some more.

      Reply
      • Christine, was just mentioning to young artist Joanne about using tissue paper to “skin” one’s sculptures. I really love your color choices. Very pretty.

        Reply
      • This vessel I made many years ago and was one of my stalled projects and I used the tissue paper to finish it. I posted this on this on the site sometime ago but here it is again. This was my first tissue project.

        Reply
      • I can see your bowl has some stability. A young girl in our county fair did a bowl with paper like this, only it was so thin it would easily bend. Very creative and colorful.

        Reply
      • Wow! I think if I painted the sculptures, they wouldn’t turn out very nice, so using tissue paper to add colour would be a fantastic idea! Thank you!

        Reply
  9. Jonni , last night I was looking at this little polymer clay sculpture I did many years ago and I thought that you and your readers might like to see it. I was still pretty new at this craft so he is kind of rough in places, but I really enjoyed doing it. It is modelled after my dear husband, an avid golfer, who left this world in February, 4 years ago. Pete was very critical of my artistic endeavours so I was surprised and pleased that he seemed to really like it. After his death, the sculpture disappeared and I couldn’t find it anywhere, and everyone said they hadn’t seen it. Then last year we were making some changes and I opened a drawer in the buffet where I kept special linens and there was Pete, cradled in a lacy placemat with his detached left arm lying beside him. Again no one admitted to putting him there so I glued his arm back on and said no more. Now he sits where I can see him all the time.

    Reply
    • I’m glad nobody got in trouble for hiding it in the drawer – and I’m also glad you found it again and were able to repair it. It’s a great portrait, with a real personality showing through.

      Reply
      • Joyce, well, that’s a heart tugger. Really glad that your great little sculpture is in one piece and on display. Terrific character. Please show us any other sculptures you have made if possible. I also work with polymer clay quite a bit, but I’m even worse with people portraits than animals. Been working on an Elvis, off (mostly) and on for several years now. He’ll probably have another blue Christmas. Years ago I was intrigued by the work of an artist named Gail Lackey and made two little, (I think) creepy/cute kids. They can’t compare to yours or hers, but I’ll try to post them.

        Reply
        • Shelbot, I am speechless. What characters. I think you must have had a peek into my childhood while doing the boy. I had big ears and pigeon-toed! The teddy bears are quite delightful.

          What is that hair? These really made my day happier. Thanks.

          Reply
          • Sir Winn, And he shall be called Rex. Girl’s name suggestion? The hair is actually (my late, beloved) cockatiel’s naturally shed (breast?) feathers.
            Thank you so much for your comment. You make a lot of us happy. And I hope your day gets happier still.

            Reply
            • I’m not allowed to name things! I hope someone comes up with a great name. (Something royal.) I like the creativity of the hair even more now. Nice to have a little of the cockatiel around. They really are cute.

            • Rex, my brain is so fuzzy. Why, again, are you not allowed to name things? I really do love your comments, but the feather hair was just me being lazy : )

        • Shelbot, they are sweet little kids! I love the expression on the little boy and his chin. You are hard on yourself, they are good.

          Reply
          • Eileen, I love my little kids, but if you’ve ever viewed Gail Lackey’s art dolls, it’s easy to see how inferior my workmanship is.
            http://gaillackey.blogspot.com/
            But I get to treasure your kind words, so I win ; ) Thank you!
            BTW- Do people still sing “Come on Eileen” to you? Do you hate me for even bringing it up?

            Reply
            • I think Gail’s art dolls are rather creepy and would give my grand daughters nightmares!
              I didn’t think I knew the song you mentioned so I looked it up on Youtube. I LIKE THAT SONG! I never knew he was singing to an Eileen…that’s how closely I listened to the lyrics. I do however get “Eileen good night” a lot even tho it is Irene good night. Thanks for a good laugh!

            • Eileen, I thought little kids would love Gail Lackey’s art dolls, even though I know they are not toys. If your granddaughter didn’t know the backstory to the dolls (they are dead), do you think she would be frightened by their appearance alone?
              I like “your” song too. Although YOU just didn’t pay attention, I can never understand song lyrics and have to look them up. I’m old.

        • Shelbot, thanks so much. I do have some photos somewhere so I will get them out and post them, but I must say they are a couple of endearing kids you made. You can tell they are related because of their ears! I really liked working with polymer clay, but I have an old stove and the oven wasn’t reliable. After one little guy almost burned to a crisp, I switched to air dry clay.

          Reply
          • Joyce, So happy that you may have more pix to show us of your wonderful art.
            Thank you for your comment on my polykids. Yeah, I guess they don’t share many features except the ears, but they are brother and sister : ). I empathize about the oven, and one shouldn’t breathe those fumes when polymer clay burns. So I’m glad you’re using air dry clay. I have used it, but even wrapped & stored in a container it tends to dry out between sculpts and I have to toss it. How do you keep it pliable?

            Reply
            • Shelbot, I have had to throw out dried up clay too. Right now I have unopened packages so I hope they will be okay, but the leftover bits are triple plastic wrapped in a baggie so I hope they will be okay when I go to use them.

        • Ahh Shelbot these are adorable. I love it how we get inspirations from other artists and then put our own touches in them. I don’t think your children are creepy at all, just sweet. Funny story about Elvis’ blue Christmas. hehe I have a piece (a witch bathing) like that who has been sitting around for 2 years just reminding me that she would love to finally get her hands to hold her brush which rubs her back but for some reason I have such a block on this piece. I just can’t seem to find the creative energy to finish her. She sits in a bathtub with a bubblebath. Maybe I’ll finish her, one of these Christmases if you finish your Elvis. hehe

          Reply
          • Vicki, so good to hear from you. Thank you so much for your reply. I totally empathize with not being able to find the creative energy. Your block seems to be about that one piece, whereas mine seems to be about everything. Would it help to talk about your witch or to show us what you have so far? I don’t have a pic right now, but my Elvis is bald and he looks a wee bit more like “Kojak” than Elvis. If you aren’t a telly watcher or if you are a baby (under 50) you probably have no idea what I am talking about. But it’s not looking good for “The Pelvis”. I, however, REALLY want you to finish your witch. Is it called “Bubble, bubble”? a play on “Double, double, toil and trouble”? Should I stop now? I see you nodding your head. But I very much appreciate your comment!

            Reply
            • Shelbot, a bald Elvis! Poor guy. I’m under 60 but not under 50, so I’m not a baby and I remember Kojak very well! haha A mixture of Elvis and Kojak. Well my unfinished witch has something in common with your Elvis, she’s bald too. So sweet of you to offer ideas to help me get over my creative block on her. I think it’s just the story behind her. Too long to tell here. I did make one attempt yesterday to clear out all negative energy in my work room by decluttering and removing all things that have nothing to do with my paper mache work. It’s all bogging me down. I cleared it out and made room for new, positive, creative energy. I don’t know if anyone can relate to this, but I tell you, it works for me! After each project it’s like a ritual that I clean everything up from the old project, and clear the path for new. This time I did a big spring cleaning though including windows, floor and removing all items from my cupboard and dusting everything off. Hope I’m ready to get back to work now. If I get brave I’ll share a pic of the witch in the form she’s in now, but only if you promise to show a picture of your bald Kojak-Elvis. hehe

            • Vicki, you are spot on about cleaning up one’s environment to encourage creativity. Unfortunately I am always so tired, that when I have the option of working or sleeping; I sleep. I haven’t made much headway on any of my pieces for weeks. Months? I did make one small sculpture as a b’day gift for a friend, but I really need to clean my desk/work space as you said. Would you come help? When my photographer friend comes back over, I’ll have him take a pic of Kovis…(Eljak?)

      • Thanks, Rex. I was surprised when my husband actually liked this because he was much better looking than how I made him. I did learn to make better faces with more practice.

        Reply
  10. OMG I feel like I died and went to paper mache Heaven in cyber space! This site is like finding a treasure chest full of all the secrets to paper mache that I always wanted to know in one place. Even answers about weather proofing which is a major issue for me, and then seeing videos of this sweet lady who makes you feel like visiting your own Mom who is just so open and willing to share all of her baking secrets with you. Wow I am so excited to find all this valuable information, I don’t even know where to start except to say thank you to Jonni for giving artists a platform to meet and to share experiences. It’s midnight here in Germany but I’m too pepped up about finding so many answers to so many of my questions that I might just spend all night here.

    Reply
    • Yes Vicki, we all feel the same way…Jonni and her tutorials have saved our lives in so many ways. Please come back and share your projects with us, we love seeing people’s work and it is a lovely, supportive group of Jonni admirers. They have become like family to me, though I have never met them. Welcome to the club.

      Reply
      • Thanks Eileen for the friendly welcome to the club of Jonni admirers. I’m joining with excitement and inspiration and also with a bit of humilty and respect when I see all of the very talented artists in this forum. I’m just glad to have found a comfortable place in cyber world to share my passion with those who love paper mache as much as I do. I didn’t realize there are so many of us scattered around the world! Once I figure out how to do it I’ll share a few of my projects in photos. I’m not sure if I should share it here or start a new thread? I’ll catch on.

        Reply
        • Vicki, a new thread for a new project is perfect – you did it right. Thanks for joining us, and sharing your creation. Be ready for us to beg for more. 🙂

          Reply
    • I agree. I bought Jonni’s book many years ago and began doing every lesson. The awesome book on making paper mache animals. I read every word but didn’t pay attention to the blog until I had finished every project in the book. One day I got online and realized what a great opportunity I had missed by not getting on the blog on lesson one. People have an answer for everything. Awesome group.

      Reply
      • Rex, what?! You made every project in Jonni’s Animal book. That’s pretty amazing. I know this book is for me. I’m going to order a few of her books. I’ll let you and the group know if I actually make any of the projects. I mostly just want to learn how she does it, and about the clay, well just everything. There’s so much to learn! I don’t even know how one can work from a pattern. I’m curious about that. I just throw my figures together using whatever material I find around the house. But there’s room for improvement. Would it be asking too much to ask you to show pics of all your Jonni projects or are there too many of them?

        Reply
        • Vicki, I think everyone ought to make all the projects in Jonni’s book, “Make Animal Sculptures.” She lays out progressive lessons and promises at the end that you can now call yourself an artist. I believe that is more than true. I wish I had gotten on this site before finishing the book because people here are very helpful and could have saved me some trouble. You will learn all you need to know if you follow her lessons.

          I’ll try and combine as many projects into the least number of photographs. Having said that, I made many of all of the projects. It became a joke that I had to make five before I could make a decent one.

          There are seven projects in the book.

          Reply
          • Rex, I just accidentally found this treasure trove of pix of your art. It is awesome! I had also happened upon the pic of Vicki’s wonderful Wonderland rabbit and your incredible WIP jack rabbit. I’d hate anyone to miss these great pix. I really want people to either re-post at the top or to let people know that they’ve posted a pic elsewhere, but I guess I’ll just have to keep wanting. Sigh…

            Reply
            • It’s supposed to be hidden! Vicki wanted to see the projects I did in Jonni’s book, and that is why I put these up. As you may well imagine, there was not “one” project per lesson. I did a bunch of chickens, same with the fish, etc.

            • Rex, don’t deprive others of the joy of looking at your art. It’s one of my fave things to do. Any more pix? Please post at the top.

  11. Congratulations, Jonni, on your lovely new website and your beautiful art prints. They are so, so nice and I love your commentary on each one…makes them very special. I wish you every success in this venture. I have done digital art off and on for many years and I have many software programs, but have never heard of Paint Tool Sai…is that a new kid on the block? I think the way you have this set up with not having to do the shipping yourself it’s a winner!

    Reply
    • Hi Joyce. Thanks for the encouraging words. The paint program I’m using is Japanese, and it’s functions are really limited. That’s why I chose that one, actually – my brain goes numb just looking at all the tools in Photoshop. Although I am trying to get more comfortable with it, and I even bought some custom PS fur brushes from Aaron Blaise. (I haven’t used them yet, but I have a furry raccoon on the digital drawing board, so I’m hoping to try them sometime this week.)

      Do you print your digital paintings for your house and frame them? Which programs do you recommend for a beginner?

      Reply
      • Jonni, I am a software junkie..I have used so many different programs, some free and others purchased, that I’m not sure how to answer. First and I would say mostly important is a tablet and pen. I hope you have this because drawing and painting with a mouse is difficult and can lead to serious hand problems. Years ago I wound up with a frozen hand from mouse use and thought for a while I would have to have surgery. Now I hardly ever use a mouse, but perhaps this is old stuff to you. As for the best program, Photoshop is the king of software and I have never been able to afford it. I have two main programs that I use (both purchased on sale) Paint Shop Pro and Corel Painter. I have been using Paint Shop Pro since version 6 and my current one is 19, however it is not great for painting. Painter on the other hand is wonderful for painting, but difficult to draw with so I usually work between the two. There are so many ways to produce digital art, for instance you could do a line drawing by hand, scan it and do the painting digitally, or you could use a photo of an actual sculpture then turn it into a painting and so on. I don’t know how you did your animal paintings, but I think if you have Photoshop you have the best program (except I guess for Illustrator which is very pricey too). There is another one called Photoshop Elements which I have, but find the text is too small for me.
        I don’t know whether I have helped, but feel free to ask me anything and I will try to answer. I have been using my iPad a lot lately for art work, but I haven’t yet figured out how to print from it. I send my work to my computer and print it out from there.
        I haven’t done any large art work for a while, but I still make all my cards using all different mediums. I should have said “art stuff junkie” because I have so much art material I will never get time to use it all. To sum it up, I would say get the trial version of Corel Painter and try it out then if you like it, wait for a sale It is probably easier than Photoshop.

        Reply
        • Hi Joyce. I didn’t know that Corel Painter sometimes goes on sale. The normal price is way over my tiny budget, but I’ll take a look at their trial version. Thanks for the tip. Another Japanese program that a lot of the kids are using is Krita. It comes highly recommended, but my computer froze up when I tried it. Sai is amazingly fast, but limited. I’ll probably do most of my work with Sai, since it’s so easy, and then do any fancy brushwork with Photoshop. I do have a tablet and pen, which I agree is needed. Mouse just wouldn’t work.

          Reply
          • Jonni, I just revisited your new site and I would say that if you can create those images with Sai, I would do what you said and stick with it and tweak with Photoshop. And I must say that page is one of the most attractive selling pages I have ever seen. Everything is so clean and uncluttered it really shows off the art work. I especially like that part where it shows the image framed.
            I downloaded Sai to see what it was like, but I had to press really hard when using the paint brush…maybe a setting somewhere. How long have you been using it? Just wondered because your paintings are so professional.

            Reply
            • Hi Joyce. Thank you so much for your kind words about the site design. That means a lot to me.

              I haven’t been working with digital painting for more than a few months, but I used to make Flash animations for fun. That was a long time ago, though. I believe I changed some of the settings on my Wacom tablet for the pressure issue. I think you can also change individual settings on the tools by right-clicking, and choosing options. I have not done that, and I’m not sure how it works. I chose Sai after watching this video by Borodante. I may need to go back and watch it again to see if there were a few things I missed. I probably missed a whole lot of things. 🙂

  12. Honey (Rex) I shrunk the giraffe. I had such fun doing this (except painting all those spots) I just might make another. Thank you Rex for sharing your pattern. Your giraffes were so inspiring. Your tutorial here was so helpful as well. Keep sharing your wonderful work.

    Reply
          • It worked this time. Thanks for being patient and trying again – your giraffe is lovely. How big is it, and how long did it take to make? And (I always have to ask) did you have any trouble getting him to stand up on those long legs?

            Reply
            • Thank you Jonni. He is 8 inches tall and 1 inch across the back. I used foam core board for his armature and tooth picks taped to his ankles to give more support. He is very sturdy. This project worked up quite quickly. I would say about 10 hours.

            • I think Jonni that you could do him just as quick with the foam core. The attached pic shows the piece with the tape ready for the clay. It is nice and stable.
              I am working on something a little different this time. I just discovered steampunk art and find it confusing but fascinating. I am trying to combine it with mache. Not sure how it will look in the end but it should be an interesting art journey.
              By the way I wish you the best with your new site and the sale of your prints. They look fabulous!
              I enjoyed your videos on selling your mache pieces. It was like you were speaking for me as well. I too have considered selling but it just wasn’t profitable for me. The outgoing expenses did not make it a worthy adventure. I also have trouble letting go if my pieces as they give me joy to look at them.

            • I’m glad I’m not the only one who develops a relationship with my totally inanimate sculptures. But how can you help it, after spending so many hours creating them? I wonder if the people who created those beautiful cave drawings so many thousands of years ago felt the same way?

              I enjoy looking at Steampunk art, but I don’t understand it at all. I hope you’ll show us some of your future work and explain it all to us. 🙂

            • Thank you Shelbot. I did enjoy making the giraffe. She will be waiting a bit for her mother I think.

              You will have lots to be picky about with my attempt at mache and steampunk. And that is ok. I am open to all thoughts and opinions as long as they are polite. I can take it as I will have my big girl panties on. Lol!

              I am fascinated with the art end of it but not so much with the costumes. This may be because I do not understand exactly what it is and I have found the definitions I have read to be somewhat confusing. I even watched 20000 Leagues Under The Sea last week and still not sure what it is all about. Perhaps you could define it a bit better. I look forward to reading your thoughts on this.

    • Diann, I love the giraffe. I was watching Antique Roadshow this afternoon and this lady brought in an ark. They must have displayed about 100 animals in front of it and many more inside. This giraffe reminded me of that. I really like it. The face has a great expression, and the spots are great. I know painting the spots will drive you crazy.

      One of the reasons I mentioned the ark is that I can see this giraffe as one of the many animals entering the ark. You got work ahead of you. Thanks so much for your comments.

      So, what is next? (Sorry I was so late in responding to your post. I didn’t turn on my computer for a couple of days.)

      Reply
      • Thank you Rex. Your pattern was so easy to follow.
        It is funny that you mentioned the ark with all the other animals as my neighbour thought I should make a pair of Zebras that could find their way to her house. Lol! I might surprise her with one. That would be fun to do until I got to painting the stripes. You don’t happen to have a pattern for a Zebra to you?

        Reply
        • Diann, I do have a zebra pattern that I used. I will show an image of it here, but I will send the higher resolution scan to Jonni. I drew the different parts in different colors, obviously. The “green” leg is one of the back legs and I used the same leg twice for the front. Good luck. And if you think giraffe spots are insane to paint, have fun with zebra stripes! Can’t wait to see it.

          Reply
            • Thank you too Jonni. I think this will be a great project. We should all do small Zebras and then have a great show and tell. That would be amazing.

            • Well, Susan did an awesome job. So, Diann, if you want to change the legs, it shouldn’t be too difficult. Jonni, if you make one, I might have to follow suit! Painting those stripes, however, makes you examine your mental state! Thanks.

          • Thanks Rex. I truly appreciate your help. I hope to get started on her right away. I will certainly post pictures when she is done.

            Reply
          • The faint writing in the lower-right hand corner are symbols telling me that the spacer on the front leg is one square, and that the spacer on the rear leg is one square in back and 1 1/4 square in front. I don’t expect anyone to decipher that! It’s my own shorthand. I’m not sure the ear is to scale, either.

            Reply
  13. Hi- ok , so this is not a sculpture but a photo of a photo. Jonni and I were discussing things and I had the idea that she make a poster out of all of her sculptures bunched together, sort of like in the movie “ET” where the alien was hiding in the kid’s closet and blending into all the stuffed animals. I sort of did this for my daughter when she got a new kitten….many years ago. I told Jonni I would post a pic of the poster. At least if Jonni did this or had it done, she would not have to worry about her sculptures escaping like this little one did!

    Reply
      • Jonni, I wanted to mention, also, your kitty. Brought tears to my eyes.

        Eileen, what a great idea. Teca and I stopped by a second-hand store the other day and we bought the little green bear in your background. Thanks.

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      • Eileen, thank you for finding the picture. It is so cute. Love it.

        Rex, do you have a pic of Teca (or other real furbabies) among the not-so-real sculpted or stuffed furkids?

        Reply
  14. Yes Jonni, I would be more than happy to ship. I have $75 on her in my store. I can check the cost of shipping and let you know.
    I would be interested in packing suggestions…thank you!

    Reply
    • How big is the sculpture? I probably should know that already…

      Jim Kransberger told me to get a double-wall box, like one of these, and a sheet of 1″ foam insulation (the blue or pink kind from a building supply store). Line the box with the insulation, sides, bottom, and top. Use some bubble wrap and tape it really tight around the sculpture, with no wiggle room. Put it in the box and fill in any extra spaces to keep it from moving even a little. Put the top piece of insulation on top, and then tape up your box.

      It sounds like a lot of work, but it’s heartbreaking to ship something and have it break before the buyer gets it. Make sure the buyer helps pay for the box and other supplies, though – that’s only fair.

      Reply
      • I am going to need to measure her, but a rough guess would be 18 tall and 24 long, 8 at her widest area.
        I will send actual measurements tomorrow.
        Thanks for the shipping method!

        Reply
      • I agree with Jonni. I have sent sculptures overseas and all over the U.S. I do like the blue or pink insulation, even for the making of sculpture. I am very lucky to have a place where I can go and get free boxes. I live in a small community, but the company gets many packages, and I can find any sized box I need. The most difficult sculpture I shipped was a giraffe to the United Kingdom. I wanted it stable, so I added two extra layers of insulation. I carved the shape of the head into the insulation at the top and the shape of the feet in the bottom. I added popcorn to the box. I know it is a worry. (I also enclosed the sculpture in heavy plastic to keep it clean.) It arrived in good condition. I may be lucky that nothing I have shipped yet has broken!

        Reply
  15. After working with both the Viva towel and the Thin one ply towel, I prefer working with the thin towels. You save on glue, because it is watered down and the thin towel gives more detail while looking light and crisp.
    The picture below is using the thin paper towel.
    Harry Keaton

    Reply
    • Hi Harry, I like both of your pirates! I think I like #1 better for the Pirates of the Caribbean character. Johnny Depp was such a gangly, dirty old pirate in the movie and I think #1 captured that very well. I do like pirate #2 though, he is very shiny and gaudy like one would expect a pirate to be! It was good to see the difference of the 2 types of paper towels and now we can tailor which one to use depending on what look we want to achieve. Thanks. Who is next?

      Reply
      • Harry, I’m going to have to mostly agree with Eileen here. Both images are very appealing. But, unlike Eileen, I think I prefer the new version. It’s a wonderful piece, either way. Are you glad that you changed him? I’m waiting patiently (or not, tap-tap-tap) for Carmen.

        Reply
  16. Jonni, I finished redoing the sculpture of Johnny Depp the Caribbean Pirate.

    The first picture is of the skinny pirate, where I had used the heavier Viva Towels for his clothing. At first I was pleased with this sculpture, but each day I looked at it, I kept thinking I got the Pirate way too thin.

    That is when I decided to put some weight on the sculpture and also totally redo his costume, including changing up the colors and adding highlights of metallic rub and buff. Gold highlights on his hair, ruby metallic on his head band and his red sash, silver metallic on his white pants and some more gold rub and buff on his boots.

    I used the very thin one ply paper towel that you can find in paper towel machines in restrooms of Doctors offices or some stores like Sears. I purchased three rolls from Paper Mart, not knowing at the time that I would be using them for paper mache”.

    If you compare the two statues, notice the second one has a real crisp light weight look to his shirt, including puffed sleeves. Also compare the two pictures and notice the pants have a different effect using the thin paper towels.

    I still have not experimented with tissue paper, but intend to give it a try. One person mentioned that the color fades when using glue on tissue paper.

    If anyone wants to try the light weight paper towels, water down your Elmer’s glue so it will not be so thick when dipping the towels.

    Two pictures below. The first one was done with Viva Paper towels.

    Reply
  17. Hi Everyone,
    Finished another fish sculpture . I am not sure what it is about the fish but I love to make them. This one is titled “Shipwreck”. I found the black iron piece at a flea market when I was visiting Indiana and the small pulley here in Nova Scotia. I like to use found objects in my work I think it adds a little more interest and I love to find things and imagine what I could use them for. I am now working on a giraffe based on Rex’s design. I hope to have it finished by the end of the week. Love all the wonderful art that is being presented here. It so inspires me to create more. Thank you Jonni for offering us this space to show our work.

    Reply
    • Dianne, it’s delightful! I can see why you’re having so much fun with your fish. And I can’t wait to see that giraffe. If you use Rex’s design, will that make him the giraffe’s honorary uncle? 🙂

      Reply
        • Diann, I know that I didn’t contribute anything to your cute giraffe, but could I be his honorary uncle too? Or just Rex? Rex gets everything. Harumph.
          “Shipwreck” is wonderful and the fish make me smile. I guess everyone has noticed that the damper kind of mimics the shape of the fish. Please don’t all say, “Well, DUH!” at once. Great work, Diann.

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          • Thank you. The fish make me smile too which is probably why I make a lot of them. Yes you can be an honorary uncle too. I think Jonni’s site has made us all family connected through our creative mache projects and the wonderful support we all give each other.

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            • Diann, Thanks, Sis! (Too much?) Did you tell us what’s next? If I can find them, I’ll show you a couple of fish sculpts that I have made over the years.

        • Shelbot (brother) I would love to see your fish sculptures. We learn so much more by sharing ideas than going solo, or that is how I feel. I am still working on my steampunk/mache and will probably start my Zebra. Then it will most definitely be a fish again as they seem to call to me. I guess living surrounded by the ocean has influenced my art.

          Reply
    • Diann,
      That ” black iron piece” is a very nice stove pipe damper. It works very well in this sculpture, and I love your little fish.

      Reply
      • Yes I knew it was a damper as it was blackened and a little rusty. It cleaned up nice and I pictured it as falling from the stove in the ships galley for my piece.

        Reply
    • Hi Diann, I find myself wanting to “like” everything here. Those who are in facebook know what I mean. But all we have here is a “reply” button so here goes. I love your fish piece. I love the idea of working old and interesting objects into your sculptures. I love to recycle things as well which is why I love paper mache (I mean, recyclcing newspaper). Since you mentioned Indiana, that’s where I’m from originally but moved to Germany 30 years ago to marry my German prince and we are living happily everafter. Is this picture upside down? Actually either way would work. Very nice piece!

      Reply
      • Thank you Vicki. I always try to use some found object in my work. I like checking out yard sales, flea markets and antique shops for different pieces. I usually gravitate towards wood or metal objects. It is fun to create another purpose for them. No the picture is not upside down.

        Reply
  18. Well, here is the little birdie everyone seemed concerned over…alive and well, and a little miffed at kitty pulling his feathers off! LOL

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    • I love this sculpture – it looks like the cat is pretending total innocence, in spite of the glaring evidence to the contrary. So cat-like. Nicely done. Did you tell us already if you sell your sculptures?

      Reply
      • Ozarkdzyner, What Jonni said! I really love that you had already planned to add that pretty little bird. “Caught” is an all around successful sculpture.

        Jonni, stop stealing my words! You’re making me look like a doofus. ; )

        Reply
        • I had the basic little bird made when I finished Kitty. Wasn’t sure how to add the feathers in and make it look more “real”, but I kept working it!
          I put all of this in my store yesterday…praying it sells fast and puts me on the artist map in my area!

          Reply
      • Did you notice the little bird? I had some comments about the poor bird, so I finished him finally. Wanted everyone to know I didn’t kill the bird!
        I do have my sculptures for sale in my store. I have sold one custom sculpture thus far. Haven’t gotten the online store up and running yet, though it was one of my New Year’s resolutions…now it is May!

        Reply
        • Yes, I certainly noticed the bird, and I’m glad the cat didn’t get more than a tail feather. Be sure to let us know just as soon as your online store is up and running. I know you’ve said before where your store is, but I forget. Maybe one of our readers just happens to be within buying distance of that sculpture. You never know, so feel free to remind us. 🙂

          Reply
          • Thanks Jonni! My store, DZYNS, is located in Antiques, Treasures and More, Ozark, Alabama, off of Hwy 231.

            Reply
            • And if someone just happened to be interested, and they don’t live there, do you have a price in mind yet? Would you be willing to ship it, if someone paid for the box and bubble wrap and shipping?

              A friend who ships art glass gave me some wonderful advice on how to ship something fragile. If anyone is interested I’d be happy to share Jim’s advice.

        • I agree, this cat is so whimsical and so lively. It’s beautiful how you photographed it with the dark blue as background. That brings out the blue in the cat’s eyes and the blue feathers of the bird. It just spotlights the sculpture so well. Yes, this is an all round, perfect piece. It would be a real eye-catcher anywhere that it would be displayed. We’re all crossing our fingers that you sell it, or have sold it already.

          Reply
          • Vicki, thank you for the encouraging words! Keep watching this site, I have a Pug and Weimaraner almost completed…I will post by the weekend.

            Reply

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