Daily Sculptors Page

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15,008 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. I purchased your mask making book and absolutely love it! I find myself wishing there were more occasions to make masks! This was my first mask…I named her Josephine.

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    • From a distance, you can’t tell you’re wearing a mask – very nicely done! And why not throw a fancy-dress party once a month. It would give you and excuse to help all your friends make masks, too. 🙂

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    • I have a friend in the British Isles who made a comment to me about using the word “Awesome,” and how Americans use it. So, ignoring her, AWESOME. I am in disbelief. Love the whole thing, background, dress, costume, whatever it is — fantastic. Thanks so much. You have my utmost admiration.

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      • Candice, I’m in violent agreement with Rex on this. Mask, costume, everything. Your piratess, Josephine, is audacious, as they used to say.
        And like Jonni said, it would be fantastic if you and your friends made more cool masks to show us. Thanks for a great pic.

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  2. This wall hanger is another decade/s old piece. He’s actually even less symmetrical than he looks in the photo (ugh), but at least he is finished, more or less.

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    • It’s lovely, Shelbot. The eyes are really nice – it has such a soft, loving look. And don’t worry about symmetry – none of us are the same on both sides. Is it an Akita?

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      • Mary, that’s a cute observation. But if you knew me, you’d know that it’s highly unlikely that I’d ever actually give up a sandwich : )
        You and Susan Stelmack are on the highly coveted “People I love” list, of course.

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      • Susan, he was going for adorable. He thanks you and I thank you : ) I really overuse that smiley face thing… But your comment is much appreciated.

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    • Jonni, that’s really sweet of you, but he’s kind of a hot mess. I’m not sure what he is supposed to be. Maybe part Akita. Pretty sure he’s bigger than life, though. I usually use reference pix or steal another person’s idea outright, but I can’t remember on this one. Think that I just threw him together.

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    • I just watched NOVA program on the creation of the universe. One theorist has it that if the universe were symmetrical, matter and energy would cease. So, good job in keeping us all alive. That is most adorable, and I couldn’t have created that expression through the eyes if I worked for 50 years. Great paint job, too. That really is one of my favorite things. Thanks.

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      • Rex, thank you for acknowledging that I am indeed “keeping us all alive”. HAHA! I’d declare that you won the Internet with that comment, but I’m too busy doing the aforementioned job.
        You and Jonni and other artists here are way too modest. Of course you can (and do) top whatever I create, while you sing that “Anything You Can Do” song.
        But I love that you think it’s good. Thank you.

        But love your

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      • Thanks Jonni … You have made me very happy … I wouldn’t have discovered this fun hobby without your guidance. I’m glad you like the eyes …. *some* people may have a fit .. hahaha .. I’m grinning as I type that… we will see .. but i put cloth eyes on the dashound to compensate … hehehe …

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      • Mary, call me crazy (as if you don’t already), but I like the googly eyes. He is my fave so far. (Sorry, little Dashound. You’re cute too) And, like Jonni, I love Arf-fur. Hope you, hubby and all of your furkids are well.

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        • well, I’m amazed … you like googly eyes. How about that 🙂 Thanks Shelbot … He is pretty cute. I’m going to have a hard time parting with them on Saturday next. I’m glad you like Arf-Fur … Thanks for commenting .. I couldn’t wait to hear what you thought. If he’s your favourite so far … That’s high praise indeed.

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          • Mary, yup. Really loving the googlies. It’s the reflected light. Gives the eyes life. Are all your little critters already sold? I apologize that I don’t know where they are going. Someone will be happy.
            I liked the name Excali-Burre (Excalibur, the 1981 movie used to be one of my faves) also, but am too ignorant to figure out the reference to the sculpture.
            You may consider yourself highly praised! Albeit, by an old fool : (

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            • Hi There Shelbot, All my little critters are going to a craft show and may be sold. I hate that … I get so attached but then again I started into this to try to make some money to help support my rescue dogs. The reference to Excalibre … Excali-Beurre .. was just a little bit of fun, The wee doggy on the table looking at the butter knife sticking out of the lb. of butter. i believe beurre, is the french spelling for butter, just a play on words. so .. I called him Arf-Fur .. too ..

            • Mary, Thanks for the explanation : ). I bet all of your little critters get new homes, although I know it will be sad to see their little googly, button and cloth eyes welling with tears… Sniff. How can you be so heartless, Mary!? Kidding, but I don’t want to make this any harder on you. I’m sure that they will be loved. Best of luck to you. Anyone who rescues dogs/animals has a place in my heart. Thank you.

    • Macheanimal, your grey seal (?) mask is really wonderful. But, like Jonni, Rex and the other artists here (You know who you are), you only do wonderful. Can you tell us what the eyes are or is that a trade secret?

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  3. I have been woodcarving birds and animals for some years but have not had time lately to spare but recently discovered Jonni’s clay recipe and made myself some with the addition of gap sealer ( No More Gaps in Australia). I have found it to be quick, versatile and robust to use. I have 3 or 4 projects going at one time and have already sold a few pieces I have posted my first attempt at a mammal in clay over a cardboard armiture. It is a marsupial known as a Numbat, now endangered but the subject of a recovery project.

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      • Chris, so glad you showed us your Numbat. He is fantastic and that’s a great picture. Had to make sure that he wasn’t real. Still want to see your bird carvings, if possible. And lots and lots more PM clay sculptures please. Thanks.

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      • Thanks Jonni, gap sealer is a white paste that comes in a tube that is used for filling cracks between boards or wall edges etc. NO MORE GAPS is a common brand here in Australia.( you use a cheap applicator gun to dispense it) and one tube will make 8-10 batches of clay at half a cup per batch. It is very cheap. I have found that it keeps the clay from going mouldy if refrigerated. My last batch was made late Feb and is still viable today . I have not made any other type of clay admittedly so cannot compare but it is dry in an hour or two and rock hard overnight. The recipe I use to make your clay is half a cup cup each of pvc glue, gap sealer and corn flour( starch to you?) I weigh 24 gms of dry toilet paper, wet it in warm water and squeeze it dry till it weighs 110 gms. I add all ingredients and mix with an old cake mixer adding plain flour to stiffen then knead it for 5-10 minutes on corn floured board ( corn starch is made from wheat here!!?) I put it in a sealed container and in fridge to store.

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    • Wow Chris, that is a beautiful sculpture! So, you went from subtractive to additive sculpting. Do you prefer either one of them? Personally, I find subtractive, as in carving out your birds in wood, to be so much more daunting. One mistake and you are done! In additive, you can always add more.
      Wonderful sculpture and congrats on selling pieces.

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    • Chris, thanks so much. That is as good as it gets right there. Don’t they give out artist of the country awards down there? I really like that. And thanks for your comments.

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    • Don’t let the brat eat the butter! I love all your comments, and your dogs just make me laugh out loud. Thank you so much. And please keep us updated on your progress. Love the photo of you with yours dogs. Wonderful.

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      • Thanks Rex, … The support that Jonni and this marvelous community has given me has been much appreciated. It’s has egged me on to try more critter experiments. I’m so happy I made someone laugh. We need lots of joy in this sorry old world. I consider every laugh and smile generated a small triumph for the forces of good and light… Mary

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  4. Excali-Burre and the new kid Arf-Fur .. (a work in progress)
    Hi Jonni, Here is my newest lil fellow … in the works. I only have one arm so I find working small to be a bigger challenge than the large dogs but definitely takes less material & time. The new kid found himself at the dining room table this morning contemplating the butter knife. My husband is looking a wee bit quizzical … so he decided to feed him a bit of his breakfast, good old porridge.

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    • Oh, come on, Mary, I already winced when I thought of how difficult all that sewing was, now you tell me that you are doing this with one hand!? When I couldn’t do it with any amount of hands. And MY old eyes can’t tell what kind of eyes that cute, new kid has. Are they not on yet? It was very nice of your hubby to feed the little guy, in any event : ) Welp, I still don’t like button eyes, but you are awesome.

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      • Hi THere, His eyes aren’t on yet. I’ve been a little busy of late making commissions for doggy bags (quilted) so … you will just have to wait a wee bit longer. but it’s true. I was born with only one hand, left one got lost in transit somewhere .. *lol* If Jonni would allow this picture .. you can all see where i draw my inspiration from. this would give you guys a visual of my physical challenge (arm) … and my models.

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        • Beautiful picture in so many ways, Mary. I have a LOT of trouble even with two hands, so I think I’d be a little ticked if one of them “got lost in transit” LOL. Your dogs are gorgeous. Had a beautiful big, black dog named Taylor about 9 years ago. As always, I have to wait for my friend to take a pic, but will post my polymer pup/s then. Thank you, Mary.

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          • Thank-you Shelbot .. I do feel blessed to live where I live and have all these dog friends and of course my hubby is also my best friend, We have a creative wonderful place here. Thank-you for your warm support of my creations. It is much appreciated. … and I like your teasing me about the button eyes too … …. 🙂

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  5. Jonni, I will attempt to post my rooster. If successful, the reason he looks so angry is because he has been sitting around for over a decade without wings, and (possibly) feet. If he ever gets finished, I’m not sure what color/s he will be. Body probably won’t be filthy white, as he is now : ) But tail feathers may stay the same.

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    • He does look a little peeved about something, but other than that it looks very nice. Roosters have a reputation for often being angry about one thing or another, so maybe it isn’t just because you haven’t finished him yet. Will you be giving him some wings and feet soon? And may I ask why you decided to start painting before the sculpting was done? Is that part of your process? Or did you just get in the mood?

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      • Jonni, it’s funny that you think I have a “process”. But perhaps you could call it that!? I have no patience. I often paint paper mache before it dries. Paint right over wet glue. I sometimes paint polymer clay while it’s still too hot to hold. As I said before, I often just make and paint heads, sometimes they don’t even have a back to the head. I am not at all disciplined, and it shows.
        And yeah, the rooster proly has a whole list of grievances BG. I guess he has a shot at getting wings, maybe feet (he is supposed to be a shelf sitter, so not sure how they’d be positioned) but most likely not very soon.

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          • I didn’t have the impression I wasn’t looking at a finished art piece, I really like it just the way it is! The body gives full credit to the most outstanding features of the rooster, it’s head and tail!

            I’m sure he’s not angry, he’s just studying the seeds on the ground to pick out the nicest ones first! 😀 And since he’s getting a little older his eyesight is wearing off a little :p That takes a lot of concentration ya know! He’s perfect as is and I love the way you work. I learned in time too not to let the preconceived image of how something is supposed to turn out and what way to work that makes sense rule me. The ruler is: Is it still fun to make and am I enjoying myself, if the answer is YES any way of working goes and any stage to stop working at it goes too.

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            • Soul, I loved every word of your reply! If you weren’t already on my “People I love” list…on ya go.
              However, if I live long enough, he’ll proly get wings and feet, ’cause: Jonni Good (top of list) : ) But you are ever so kind. Thank you.

          • Jonni, permission to nag: Granted. If you really want to see the rooster finished, I will try, at some point, to do that. Still going to take a while.
            And you certainly have the patience to research and get the understructure of your sculpts correct before you start with the mache. I just figure I’ll fix it later. That’s why you are the REAL artist. Well, one of the reasons anyway.

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          • I have found that having 2 or 3 projects on the go is good for patience deficiency , when waiting for one thing to dry you can work on the others!

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    • Shelbot, I think Soul is right. The body looked finished to me, and I think that “dirty” look is perfect. So, when you get him finished next week, I have another rooster for you to do. Let me introduce you to Frederick. He is my most favorite rooster ever. He was so tiny and brave. I loved him so much. (It’s a way too long of a story for here, but he was the best guy ever.)

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      • Another rooster with an attitude! With a photo like that, there may be a few readers who beat Shelbot to it. I hope so – I’d love to see this guy immortalized in paper mache. 🙂

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        • I just loved Frederick — I think I said that. He was tiny. The other rooster was easily two or three times his size. But Frederick would crow and act tough, as roosters ought, until he was chased away. He had such attitude. If anyone is serious in doing a paper mache of him and need more photos for reference, I have them (stuck in my Morgue folder). Thanks so much.

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      • King of the Meadows, you’re just trying to get on my Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious list. Joke’s on you—you’re already there. And when I get ALL my sculptures finished next week LOL, you Scamp, I will take another look at dear Frederick.
        I do appreciate Jonni’s encouragement to others to make that brave, little rooster. I’d love to see a lot of Fredericks running around.

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  6. I don’t know how this photo of the bunny pumpkins (bunpumps) will display, but I’ll give it a try. I made eight of them.

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    • This is another leprechaun I just finished, along the last bunpump. This is for a friend whose high school colors (not that we’re in our 70s) were maroon and white. So I painted it Titanium White, then with Burgundy, and then with a yellow glaze.

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      • Oh, I lied. This is the Burgundy one.

        My deception in this whole process was I thought it would go quickly. I made the eight pumpkins in one evening, and then spent the next two weeks putting on the face and ears. The ears are wire screen.

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          • Jonni, you need to watch the news more often. All holidays have been suspended! Back to the giraffe, and then hopefully another rhino. Babies are coming, which I have no control over. Thank you so much.

            You can delete this photo, but it was taken a few days ago and today was 77. Go figure. Weather from Utah!

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            • With everything that’s going on lately, I think I need to watch the news less. But I somehow missed the holiday suspension. Besides, I just checked, and Arbor day is coming on the 28th. Leaves wouldn’t be nearly as cute as bunpumps, though.

              We have green grass here. I’m glad our snow is gone, at least until this weekend, but I’m not excited about getting the lawn mower out. I think lawn grass should be illegal, just so I won’t have to mow.

          • Jonni, Too many comments from this silly old man! I am dreading getting the lawn mower out and getting it started. The grass is long, but I’m beginning to like it that way. Besides, did you hear that show about animals talking, and the smell of “freshly cut grass” is actually them releasing chemicals saying they are in pain. Anyway, the gentleman I want to do a jack rabbit for (with my same name) is on my current agenda. I don’t know if this color scheme will work or not. Do you have any comments about the colors used. Good luck with the spring weather.

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            • Hi Rex. I think you might have tried to upload a photo showing your color scheme, but if you did, it didn’t work. Try again?

              You just reminded me of a book I read years ago, The Secret Life of Plants. I can’t remember a word of it, but I seem to recall enjoying the read. I just checked to see if it was still in print, and it appears to be not just available after all these years, but still popular, too. Maybe I’ll read it again sometime to see if they mention grass screaming when it’s mowed. That would give me a good excuse for letting it grow a little longer. 🙂

            • The “color scheme” was the last bunpump I posted. It’s not all that great in showing the colors.

              The television show I watched had a title very close to that. They told how “sister” plants grow roots straight down so their siblings have room to grow, and how other plants use poison warfare to keep unwanted plants away. Fascinating.

            • I get it now – I never see the comments that people are actually replying to when I approve and answer them in the back end of the site. The comments are just listed in the order they’re received – which is my silly excuse for not knowing what you meant. So if you ever see another comment from me that seems just a bit disconnected, you’ll know I have an excuse. 😉

              One of my favorite YouTubers gave a great explanation of how fungi team up with plants. I believe he used string and jelly beans. It was great. I love it when people give easy explanations to complicated processes. I wanted to add a link to the video, but now I can’t find it, but this is the channel.

            • Jonni, also, I’m thinking about starting a jackrabbit pattern. I know you made a jackrabbit, and when I looked at your armature, I was curious if you remember the “squares” you used on the legs. I have many challenges, but figuring out the distance between the legs and the body is the most difficult for me. I was wondering if you remember what your measurements were? Thanks so much.

            • Hi Rex. I drew out the jackrabbit pattern onto the wood freehand, without a paper pattern to start with. You can tell I was just starting to use the patterns because I used such heavy material for the armature. Cardboard would have worked just fine. And the jackrabbits are now living in Arizona, so I can’t measure them for you. You don’t often see photos of a jackrabbit taken from the front, but I did find one here. It looks like their legs are much closer together than I made mine, at least in the front. The back legs on that rabbit are a lot farther apart. I don’t know if that’s common or not. (I’m not helping much, am I?)

          • Thanks, Eileen. Now if only I could learn how to make real teeth. I might give it another try. I was looking at photographs of Tapirs, and they have really strange mouths. I say.

            Thanks, Mary.

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            • Boy, that is an idea…paper mache teeth instead of porcelain. It would save thousands of dollars- in my mouth anyway!
              Do not wish the grass to not grow…that is how my son makes a living! If you take away grass, he may stay in my house forever! Along that same line, I read a book on mosses and how they grow. It was fascinating believe it or not. The book read like a novel. Fun fact: it takes up to 3 years for moss to take hold and grow. Why don’t you and Jonni start to cultivate moss for your yards? It is green and never needs mowing! How do we get off onto these tangents?

    • Good Sir, Rex, you’re bunpumps are fantastic. Worth all the hard work, that I know went into them. Had tried to pick a fav but love everyone of them. I will admit that the burgundy guy is trying hard to win me over, though. And I will give a shout out to the lepumpchaun and his awesome hat. But, back to bunpumps. As others have pointed out, the teeth kill. The ears are super appealing. And those eyes… Well, you get the point. Never tire of looking at your pieces. More please!

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      • Love the bunpumps, somehow those eight (7) in a row seem to ask for a nursery rhyme…
        Puts a dime in the nursery rhyme machine together with everyones enjoyable comments…. hmmmmm

        Have you seen in the field
        Eight bunpumps in a row
        Eight bunpumps, eight bunpumps, all ready to go

        You haven’t? You haven’t? Must be the unclipped lawn…
        Now there are only seven, and one has gawn :p

        Seven little bunpumps in the tallest grass
        At least the grass ain’t screaming of how tall it was

        The lawns turn into urban meadow, oh what a delight
        Not like those boring lawns, city meadows, what a sight!

        Son’s never leaving home because there’s no more lawn to mow
        Because bunpumps like to live in city meadows ya know

        What happened to that number eight, a leprachaun might know
        He suspended every holiday to prolongue his very own show

        But babies are coming who will take over soon
        They overrule any holiday once they have left the womb

        The bunpumps will protect them with their killer teeth
        So much fun when bunpumps and babies meet

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        • What a riot Soul! I am sure you made Rex’s day! If anyone deserves a poem, it is our Rex and you managed to get all the comments in there too. Very clever- you made my Easter evening!

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        • Soul, this much laughter can’t be good for the soul! Thank you so much for the comments, the laughs, and the rhyme. Love it. And you don’t know how true it is, for my grass hasn’t been cut this year and it is about a foot high. I’m beginning to like it that way.

          (Just in case you missed it, the eighth was the “maroon” pumpkin posted by itself. That is just too much fun.)

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  7. I have been carving wooden birds but lately have not had the time and so was intrigued when I saw your clay recipe Jonni I made a batch with the additional gap filler ( No more Gaps in Australia). Immediately I was impressed with the versatility, speed and ease in using it. I make the birds on a core of polystyrene and the wings of art paper men I can make flying birds I always try to work in life size so Eagles are going to be fun! I have made a Numbat, a rare Marsupial that feeds entirely on termites and have included a photo, the first of many native Aussie critters.

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    • Okay, Chris, please try again. You have my full attention. Sometime in the next couple of months, I need to do some bluebirds, so . . .

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      • Chris, please add me to those asking you to try to upload the photo/s again. I really want to see your Numbat or anything else you have to show. Do you have a site where we can see your wood carvings?

        Rex, bluebirds by the King of (pm) clay? Oh, joy…

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  8. I have been woodcarving birds and an occasional animal, for many years but it it is a slow process and I don’t always have time. I have avoided paper mache as I assumed I could not get the reality I desired. Therefore I was intrigued when I discovered your work Jonni. I made a batch of clay ( with the recipe that has gap filler added) and I am amazed how flexible and practical it is to use. I build the birds around a styrofoam core and it is quick and accurate enough for my liking. By using paper wings it will allow me to make flying birds.The picture I posted is of a Numbat, an endangered Australian marsupial, the first of many native animals I hope to make.

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    • Hi Christina. The image you tried to post didn’t come through and we really want to see it. The file size was probably too big. I hope you’ll try again. (The system is a little tricky, and it takes awhile to get used to it.)

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    • I get such a kick out of these. Thanks again. I have Loki’s ashes (my dog), and so this gave me an idea. (I’ll add it to my list.) Awesome.

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      • Thanks Rex, They are fun .. I love the name of your dog, Loki … haha, The trickster if I’m not mistaken and a Viking Rune, right?? I’ll look it up on google. Some of this being a senior stuff is painful for me (arthritis and such) . but the second childhood part and having time to do these whimsical projects is the best part. I love seeing how each new creation turns out, like reading a good book, gotta hurry to the end to see how it turns out. I’ll keep posting when I make more. 🙂 Thanks again for your comment.

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        • I just finished reading Neil Gaiman’s book, “Norse Mythology.” It was fascinating. Loki is throughout, of course. What really struck me was how very clever, mischievous, and helpful he was all at the same time. Most of the gods hated him but were thankful for what he did at the same time. Very complicated character. (Loki was truly the love of my life.)

          I know what you mean about projects. You begin one and never know how it is going to end up at all. Thanks for the comment.

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  9. Off with their heads … hey, I’ve been busy … I’m sure my yard and garden will demand a lot of attention soon so I’ve had one last fling … being creative indoors. I was thinking of making an urn for Sherlock’s ashes …. so .. I made a special jar. After I made it, I thought .. it could hold cookies or any kind of treasures … so cute, I hate to give them new homes but it’s getting a bit crowded in here. “lol”

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    • Mary, I am a critical jerk, so I will say that I hate when artists use buttons for eyes. But I think that your pups are great. And clever. I either missed or forgot if you said whether you sew the fabric. Please tell me you use hot glue or something. I can’t even imagine sewing those. With a machine or by hand. But thank you for sharing.

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      • Hi Shelbot, I’m sorry if you think that the eyes are a cop out but .. I just use whatever I think will look cute and I suspect that … even you will have to admit, those buttons indeed give this little blue feller a peabody look and the coyote guy with the pointy snout a very willy look indeed. I’ll not apologize because, I’m a “fiber artist” and I use whatever comes to hand or mind. and yes, I do sew the fabric. I am also a recycle artist. I use all the wee little scraps that the other quilters in my quilt guild would throw in the garbage. thanks for the compliments on my pups, They are surprising and cute lil fellows. Hey, Just wait till I use a pkg of googly eyes, You’ll have a fit … *lol* I’m grinning. No offense has been taken, I know humour often doesn’t translate on the internet .. so (very big grin )

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        • Mary, what a sweet reply to my insufferable comment. And, of course, no artist need defend their art. I am old and cantankerous and have to tell everyone what I don’t like. But I certainly admire you for upcycling “wee little scraps”. And the sewing…
          I’m trying to decide if I WILL have a fit about the googly eyes. That was very funny. Thanks for the laugh, Mary.

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          • No Problem Shelbot … I do my art to please me and if anyone else likes it too .. that’s a bonus. I can’t wait to finish Sir. Arf-Fur … so you can see the googly eyes … hahaha .. Love chatting. As for old and cantankerous … I’m no spring chicken myself and I think we have earned that right … so … keep it up … 🙂

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  10. K so I put aside the bull for now and am working on a centaur child…I am going to use drylock on another paper mache project and see how it holds up in the shower….I want the centaur child as a lawn piece…Will give u updates!!!

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    • HI….I’m sorry, I’m not really replying….but can’t figure how to start my own post…lol
      I’m newer to paper mache…..my question is this…my friend and and are using different mediums…kinda playing around to see what works, what doesn’t . I got some plaster of Paris cast stuff. If I do a layer of that over the paper mache, can I then do paper clay?
      In other words….can you use different mediums on same sculpture?
      The idea with the cast stuff,,,is it drys quicker….but not I’m wondering will it hold paper clay as well???
      Thanks in advance!
      I love your site.

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      • Hi Laura. First – to start your own thread, just scroll waaaay down to the bottom, and use the form down there. Strange, I know. But it works. Your post ends up at the top of the page if you do it that way.

        And yes, you can use different media on the same sculpture. Mixed media is what you’d call it if you do that. I often use plaster cloth under paper mache clay or under paper mache, and it works really well. The plaster does harden faster, and it will continue to dry even with paper mache added on top.

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  11. I completed the paper mache’ sculpture of Sheriff Bob from the 1930 Eddie Cantor movie “Whoopee.” Sheriff Bob is all duded up, because it is his wedding day. “Whoopee” was first a play on Broadway and then came out as a two-color Technicolor movie in 1930. The sets and costumes are elaborate and certainly enhance the musical numbers. In the movie Sheriff Bob Wells is played by Jack Rutherford an actor from England. I have a copy of the film “Whoopee” and it is hard to believe that so much time and effort was put into a movie that was filmed 87 years ago. If you would like to see short musical numbers from the movie, go to You Tube and type in “Whoopee a 1930 Eddie Cantor movie.” You can see several of the clips from the movie. You will notice that the film has a Stage Quality that is priceless. Also bring up “Whoopee the ten gallon hat dance”, this will give you an idea of how much “Pink” they used for the cowboy’s and cowgirl’s costumes. Busby Berkeley was the Choreographer and Director. The play and the movie were both produced by Ziegfeld.
    My sculpture is titled “Sheriff Bob Dressed Up For A Wedding.” (By the way, in the movie, Sheriff Bob doesn’t get married, because his fiancee is in love with someone else.) Poor Sheriff Bob, it just wasn’t his wedding day, but at least he is all dressed up with lots of silver buckles and he looks real flashy.
    The sculpture’s armature is made with two extra long chopsticks for legs and wooded paint mixer sticks for the body and head. The arms were made with nine gauge wire.
    I shaped the body with aluminum foil and then covered it with masking tape. To firm the body I use plaster wrap cloth. I used Apoxy clay to form the Sheriff’s head. The clothes are made by dipping Viva smooth finish paper towels in Elmer’s Glueall and draped to form clothing. I ordered some sheriff badges from Oriental Traders and cut them up to form all the silver buckles on his boot, his hat band and around his arm bands.
    I hope you enjoy seeing what Broadway thought a Sheriff would wear on his Wedding Day,,,,lol.

    Reply
    • Wow – that cowboy is wearing a lot of bling. Do people still say that? I’m old, so I can’t keep up. 🙂

      Nicely done, Harry. Rex sent me his copy of Lawrence of Arabia, so I’ll be watching it tonight. And now I’ll have to go take a look at all that pink surrounding the Sheriff on YouTube…

      Reply
      • Hi Jonni,
        I think the word “Bling” is still popular, but at my age I wouldn’t swear to it,,,,lol. (One thing I left out of the description, is the sculpture of Sheriff Bob is 26 inches tall.)
        I hope you will enjoy the movie “Lawrence of Arabia”. I was watching an interview with Peter O’toole, where he described a scene from the movie. Everyone mounted their camels and raced across the desert as fast as possible. Peter was alarmed, because it was a dangerous and lengthy scene. The actors would have difficulty staying on the backs of their camels and not falling and being trampled. Before the scene was shot, Peter asked Omar Sharif, how he intended to race across the desert and stay on the back of his camel. Omar said, “I plan to get drunk and then have them tie me to the back of my camel !!!”
        Peter said,,,”What a wonderful idea, I will do the same thing.”
        Sure enough that is what happened. So as you watch the film notice the blood shot eyes and the drunk expressions on Peter’s and Omar’s faces as they are tied in place and held on to their racing camels for dear life,,,,lol.
        I think you will also enjoy the You Tube clips from “Whoopee”. There are several clips from the movie. If you have time, try to watch all of them. It will give you a true flavor of the movie.

        Reply
        • Harry, your “Sherrif Bob” is beautiful. Lovely draping of the clothes and the metal garnishes really add to the sculpture. I will have to check out the info re this and Lawrence. Thank you so much for sharing.

          Reply
          • Joyce, thank you for your reply. I am glad you liked Sheriff Bob. I live in Texas, so I am very aware that cowboys don’t dress this flashy,,,lol. I think that is why I found Sheriff Bob an interesting character. He is Broadway’s version of a cowboy on his wedding day.

            Reply
      • Harry, love the cowboy. I’m wondering with Jonni about the “age” thing. It bothers me that I know the terms and don’t know what I’ve forgotten. I could use some inspiration from you. If I ever get away from pumpkins, I’d like to do figures.

        I must say that I called a store and asked if they had “typing paper.” There was an immense pause. Then the clerk said, “Well, we have computer paper, if that is what you mean!”

        I do appreciate all the bling. Thanks.

        I watched “Lawrence” before sending it off, and this time I watched all the extra interview with the actors. It was very interesting. Thanks for the rewind!

        Maybe your Bob is what we used to call a drug-store cowboy, because I had a bunch of relatives who thought they were real cowboys.

        Reply
        • Hi Rex, yes I do believe Sheriff Bob could be described as a drug store cowboy,,,,,lol.

          This age thing is not the least bit fun. I take my three dogs to a groomer that I have used for 17 years. She seems like part of the family. I often bake artisan bread or a loaf of banana bread and send to the bunch that works for the groomer. It is just a way of saying thank you. The other day I was baking something for them and I phoned to tell them that I was sending it down for them for a snack. I got on the phone and the groomer’s son answered. I was trying to think what I was baking them,,,,I kept saying,,,”I am baking you guys some,,,,,,????” The third time I tried to remember, the groomer’s son said,,,,”Yep, I know what you are baking Mr. Keaton you are trying to remember that it is Banana Bread. I started laughing and said,,,”Yep I am baking banana bread for you guys,,,,lol. Heck Rex, I couldn’t remember what I had mixed up and put in the oven,,,,lol. As I said,,,,”Old age is not fun.”

          Reply
          • Harry, it took me so long, you may never see this, but I really love your fancy Sheriff Bob. I keep thinking of characters I would love to see you make—did I already suggest subway grating Marilyn Monroe from “The Seven Year Itch”? Anyway, please keep showing us whatever you create.
            And, Harry, don’t you and Rex get me started on Old Age Syndrome. But I guess it doesn’t matter. I can’t remember what I was going to say anyway…

            Reply
            • Hi Shelbot, glad you liked Sheriff Bob. He was a fun character to sculpt.
              Today, I started a new project. I am working on the armature for the Wicked Witch in the Wizard of Oz. While I was growing up, the Wizard of Oz movie would be shown on TV at the beginning of Fall each year. Over the years the Wicked Witch, became one of my favorite characters, maybe it was because she was green or perhaps because she had all those pet monkeys,,,,lol.

  12. Been a while since being able to do some crafting but finally working on something again.
    Making a paper mache flamingo from trash and left over materials this time to help out a friend.
    Below is a picture with the most recent progress.

    For those who want to follow the progress this is the link to the album where the updates will be posted: facebook.com/667614320006161/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1114964785271110

    Reply
      • Made glue with tapioca flour, vinegar, salt and water and the ‘junk’ filled body got it’s first layer of paper strips. Needs some additional shaping up here and there.

        Also gave the head some eyes with mini marbles and a first coloring layer.

        To be continued 😀

        Reply
        • The feathers are already beautiful. Your flamingo is going to be really nice – do you have a specific spot picked out for it, or will you be selling it?

          Reply
          • Thank you Jonni. The joy is in the making for me, I don’t sell things, I make them as gifts for family and good friends instead of buying store bought gifts, to recycle, and enjoy reusing all the material already in the house when I’m well enough to do so.

            I like taking progress pictures to look at afterwards to see how it all took shape and and hope it inspires others to turn their trash into treasure to take the weight of our global footprint instead of buying more materials or increasing the waste. That’s something money can’t buy but the world needs most now.

            This one is for a good friend who would like to use it as decoration for a music festival. Don’t know yet if it will come back after that or if she has a use for it afterwards but I still have room in the house if it needs a home after that 🙂

            Reply
    • Soul. Nice to have you back. (Even though you’re a bit nuts — I guess creative geniuses are a bit — the recycling idea is genius.) Really nice to see what you are doing.

      My dog and I have been seeing the Blue Herons that come through for a few weeks. It has been awesome. They look like sticks out in the field.

      Reply
      • Haha Rex, nuts are healthy for the brain you do know that don’t you 😀 A bit nuts helps you keep ‘sane’ :p

        Did some more shaping up, created the feet and covered the base in paper pulp and shell sand to create a beachy base.

        Also started with feathering a bit more to cover the gap of the base the body rests on.

        Reply
          • Soul, I remember your incredible deer. Making beautiful art is worth a million. Making beautiful art out of trash: priceless. Trite, but true. As Jonni said, the feathers are already beautiful for your flamingo. I cannot wait to see the end result.

            Reply
            • Soul, he/she is already so beautiful. But, I must complain about one thing (because that is what I do. Should change my name to Grumpy Grumperman). But, Please take the completed pic where the black part of his beak {or any of hirm : ) } will not get lost in the flora/background. Or is it just me who can’t see?
              And I forgot about that adorable calf. What will you be doing next?

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