Daily Sculptors Page

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15,055 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Hi Jonni,
    Hope you are well.
    Your work on the Indian Rhino inspired me to sculpt again.
    I got off to a bad start burning out my drill whilst using it as a mixer to make some of your new recipe! so unfortunately I went back to using DAS air dry clay for this piece. I accidently deleted some of the earlier photo’s of this piece-I started out shaping a couple of pieces of white polystyrene gluing them together and then covering with paper strips. But I took lots of photos of the rest of the progress the video can be seen at
    http://youtu.be/82u8eb5Cwcg
    I can’t wait to see your Rhino finished!

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    • Hi Bawana 🙂
      Good to see you again. He is magnificent. Truly another gifted piece of work . It’s amazing how good it looks especially when the size isn’t very large.

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      • Amazing work. The finished product is something I would expect to see in a museum. I love seeing Mache done like this, it really gives me something to shoot for in my work. Great work.

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    • Wonderful, as always! It’s amazing detail in a piece so small. Did you use a bronze coating? I just subscribed to your YouTube channel, and now I have to go back and see more of your videos. I would so much like to visit South Africa someday.

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      • Hi Jonni,

        Thankyou for your comments-this is my second attempt at replying-I did a lengthy reply about what I used on the finish and how I did it-but after submitting it has disappeared! I will try again tomorrow early-when I am more awake as it is late here now. Nite.

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        • Ok here we go again-I typed a lengthy reply last evening but for some reason it disappeared!

          Firstly for Jonni, I first painted the whole piece using a mixture of Black and Paynes Grey acrylic paint mixed with PVA wood glue(Elmers?) I let that dry and then using a product called GARE –MCW-6317 Bronze wash (I think this is a U.S. product) and Reeves Acrylic Bronze I used a dry brush technique to lift the highlights out in bronze. Jonni-you are welcome anytime in SA-privately email me if you wish to discuss further.

          Terry, The base was cast in Herculite No2 casting plaster cast in a plastic disposable fruit dish. After it dried out it was finished in the same way as the main piece. To fix the piece to the base I glued a wooden dowel to the back of the Buffalo using hot melt glue then I paper clayed over it and finished in paint the same way. I then drilled a hole in the base from the top using a rubber band around the drill bit to act as a depth stop and then glued the piece and the base together using a little hot melt glue-not too much because as the hole is blind at the end and it was a tight fit, if you make it a very tight fit and put too much glue in you can not push it in due to air being compressed. To counter this effect I cut little tiny cuts in the dowel, smeared with hot melt and did not put any in the hole-this seemed to work fine. I then cut a little felt and glued it to the base.

          Just to let you all know I had a complete disaster with the first base I made whilst trying to make a rubber mould to cast more of the same-I was trying to photograph and mould at the same time with hot melt rubber-dangerous and stupid! I will try and sort out some pics and a video soon-everybody makes mistakes but they are not wasted if we all learn a little something from them!

          Jose, thanks for the kind comments-praise indeed from a man with such talents! Its nice to see you are getting some commissions!

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          • Excellent description of the finish and base – thanks! I’ll have to go check out that Reeves Acrylic Bronze – it sounds very similar to the Sculpt Neuveau product I’ve been using.

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            • This message is for Bwana Foster: I hope you don’t mind, Bwana.
              I also live in South Africa (Eastern Cape) and I’ve been trying to find an alternative for joint compound/filler.
              Jonni says she thinks it’s the same as our Polyfilla but she suggested you might know for sure. I’d appreciate your input on this.

  2. Another option is to use good ole fashioned paper strips with flour and water. This will take longer to dry between layers but works quite well to cover up the chicken wire. Then do a layer of the clay to smooth it out.
    Jonni- another question for you. I did not like how the legs of my box turtle turned out. So, I amputated and started again. The shell was good so I remade the legs and used wire & tape to attach them to the inside of the armature. Just wondered if you ever did something similar and if the legs dried hard enough. I used 2 coats of the regular Jonni clay. I am concerned that the joints may crack or something. Thanks- how is the book going?

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    • I chop things up all the time, but getting a good connection between two pieces can be tricky. If you have any overlap between the old shell and the new legs, the clay will stick to itself and shouldn’t crack. But with this sort of operation, there aren’t any guarantees. If all else fails, you can always repair the crack, or even take it apart again, glue together with epoxy, and repair the crack with more clay. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that, though. You may have no problems with it at all.

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  3. What a wonderful idea for paper mache! I need to make a very large “ming” vase for the production of “Something’s Afoot”. I’m a member of The Walpole Footlighters in Walpole, MA and I’m the props chair for this show. We’re starting with a large, rubber trash can. Our tech director is building an armature and rings of wood to surround the barrel. We were planning to cover the armature with chicken wire. Will the clay spread well over the chicken wire? Or do we need to cover the chicken wire with, maybe muslin, before I use the paper mache clay? Also, how much paper mache do you think I’ll need to cover a 45 gal trash barrel that’s been shaped into a big, fat vase?
    I need to do this Tuesday night and if you could get back to me a.s.a.p. I’d appreciate it. Thanks.
    Roberta

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    • Hi Roberta,

      A. You will need something between the chicken wire and the clay to keep it from falling through the holes. One way to do this would be to use wide masking tape or a few rolls of cheap duct tape. You will need at least two or three recipes of the clay, and I’d apply it in as thin a layer as possible. That way, it will have plenty of time to dry. My pieces usually have a layer that’s 1/16th of an inch, or even less. It will dry quite hard and strong, even when applied this thin. You can then go back, after it’s dry, and add more if the chicken wire shapes show through. Apply the clay with a big, slightly damp knife to make the process go faster.

      B. Another option would be to use plaster cloth for your first layer, which would give you a solid base. Then you’d only have to add enough clay to make a nice smooth surface with no chicken wire hexagons showing through. But the plaster cloth isn’t cheap.

      C. And one more option – use an old sheet and monster mud instead of the paper mache clay. Monster mud is made with one part latex paint (like the kind you paint walls with, any color) and 5 parts joint compound. The joint compound is sold in 5 gallon containers. Mix well, then dip the pieces of fabric into the goo and spread it over your wire frame. Many people love using it for Halloween decorations, and it is sometimes used for stage props. I have never used it myself, but for this project it may actually be your best choice. If necessary for details, you can use the paper mache clay over the dried monster mud. To see people using it, do a google search for monster mud –

      Have fun!

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      • What happened to Rich/Ghoulish cop? Haven’t seen him on here lately. He would be a good resource to add to what you have suggested. I remember his Halloween cauldron.

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        • Good question! I just checked his blog, and he doesn’t seem very active this year. But he is writing his investment articles, so he hasn’t gone totally underground. Maybe he’ll get back to his paper mache and monster mud when Halloween gets a bit closer. That cauldron was impressive, wasn’t it?

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          • Yes his cauldron was amazing! Too bad we can’t see the images that were on here before the problems with pictures. I didn’t know he had a blog so thanks for the link.

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            • Hi Jose. I went back and found Rich’s comment and edited the post so you can now see the close-up of his cauldron. It’s quite amazing. You can see it here. I think I remember him saying that oatmeal was involved in getting that rough oxidation look. All paint, no metal coating, I think.

              I wonder if his ears are burning, as we discuss his work?

  4. I was commissioned by someone I know to do this sculpture of her son in his football uniform. This is made of sculpey and is about 9 inches tall. If he were standing it would be a little over 12 inches.

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    • This is another one I’ve been working on. It’s Cato from my current favorite book. The Hungers games and is based on the actor from the movie.

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        • This is amazing work, WOW. You are a great inspiration for the rest of us 🙂
          Please share the painted photos.

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        • wow. You’ve really gotten the body down. Getting the natural look of muscle and shape have always been something i have to really work at. Your work is amazing.

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          • Thanks!!! I take my time with anatomy too but the more you do it the better you get at it. I just got a book on anatomy that will help me greatly as I move forward. Jonni actually mentioned on here and is the reason I got it. It is Dynamic Anatomy by Burne Hoggarth.

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      • Gracias Jonni. That’s the idea. I’m trying to get a side business going making these for people. She’s going to be acting as my agent with her connections. Hopefully it will take off and I can dedicate myself solely to doing this. And yes it will get painted sometime this week.

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        • That would be great. I wonder if the companies selling trophies would be interested in selling them on commission? I can imagine so many proud parents who would cherish something like that.

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    • As usual, I am in awe of your workmanship. You do gorgeous work. I am going to try to make the human form. I can guarantee, it will be a long work in progress. But trying is half the fun.

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    • OMG!! SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO COOL!!! YOU ARE VERY TALENTED!!! We are currently working on our angel wings and are almost done!! Jose and Jonni- you both are an inspiration to me!!!!

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    • Hi Jose, your pieces are just wonderful!! I did some figurative sculpting with clay, in about the same scale as your pieces. You are so talented to capture the all the details so accurately! Do you bake your work in sections and assemble the parts or do you sculpt the entire piece and then bake it? Great work!!

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  5. after a long 5 month period, the little angel is now finished. Hope you guys like her.

    Oh and Jonni I used your new recipe for her face and it seemed to work out nicely. I liked how smooth it came out, I wished I had used it on the body as well, she so bumpy and I sanded and added extra on her, but nothing seemed to work, so I left it. This will be my one and only human form that I will do, it was to complicated for me.

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    • She’s lovely. Now that you have the experience with humans, aren’t you tempted to make some more? (Someday I’m going to get up the courage to try it myself.)

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      • Well,…. my painting teacher said to me: If you can portrait horses, you can portrait humans as well….. there’s no difference…. Think of Noah and the Arch….. 😉 Just try it!

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      • She got emotional when she saw her and the funny thing is I was asked to make another. OH THE PAIN of making another, but this time I will be paid for it. my problem is what to charge for another one. I don’t have a clue as to what to charge for another one of these.

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        • Ah – the big sticky question of how much to charge. It comes up over and over again, and nobody really has a good answer for that one. I like to say that you should make sure that you’re happier with the money than you would be if you kept the item you made. But if you make it special for someone, that makes the equation a bit different, because you didn’t make the item just for yourself in the first place. Sigh – when you figure it out, let us know!

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        • I say ask for $50 plus shipping if it has to be shipped. It probably isn’t anywhere near enough for the time you have in it, but it is a reasonable price, and this one should go faster, since you worked out some of the bugs on the first one. 🙂 Just my own opinion you understand.
          Good luck!

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          • 50’s not a bad price for it and if they say no, I got a new angel for my collection until someone else wants it 🙂 so thanks for that.

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    • The human body is difficult. What can really drive you crazy is that the right side and left side are not actually identical.

      However, I think the sculpture came out really well.

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    • She’s gorgeous Taria! I think you have a very good talent for the human form. Maybe it would be easier using Jonni’s new formula for the whole body next time. 🙂

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      • that is an idea since I was asked to make another one. I might just do that and see if it comes out far more smoother. thanks for the suggestion.

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    • I love your doll Taria, warts and all. I have said before, art is an evolving situation. The first is always to see what is possible, and what to change next. That is how I have looked at my vessels when I started paper mache. I went really all out when I decided I could make different kinds of vessels and on that subject alone, the possibilities are endless. So is this doll. Now you know what did not work, how about thinking of what will work? It will become easier as you get the experience. It may take three or more dolls to feel comfortable, but it will get better and better. It does not matter if you make animals or human dolls. My first of anything, I expect failure as I will make every mistake and that is fine with me. Because, I have a list of what to change next. That is my adventure.

      the wonder for me is what next?

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      • next? maybe a new one of these (since I was asked for another, being paid this time. whoo!) and one of my own creature designs (working on that one now) but thank you for the kind words they are true. Maybe I shouldn’t limit myself to just one of a kind things and really just make more in different poses.

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    • Your little angel is beautiful. Never say never, you now have the experience of making a human form, and the next one could be even better. I love her downward gaze, her hair and dress ( did you make her dress as well ?) Great work 🙂

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      • Yes ma’am I did, I had to sew it on her because making it and trying to get it over her body would have been difficult. So I just sewed it on and hemmed it up. Not perfect, but it worked and looks cute. To be honest I personally wanted to add a white pleated sheer flowing dress to her, but the lady asked for the same dress that she wore in her last photo which was a red with white dots, it took me forever to find this, but when I did I got enough to make more then one if I wanted too. I’m glad I did since she asked for another one. 🙂

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  6. I just tried out the new recipe. Unfortunately, I thought I had watched your video through, and it turns out I didn’t. I’ll redo it at another time and see if the problems I had resolve.

    However, just out of curiosity–how do you clean your instruments afterwards? The clay is great as far as smoothness (thought I didn’t wind up getting mine as smooth as yours), but I found it very difficult to clean.

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    • I have problems when I forget to wipe off my sculpting tools right away. If the stuff dries on them, they can be cleaned if I soak them in water for a minute or two. But I’m not sure this is what you mean – when you say your clay wasn’t quite right, can you tell us what happened? Just in case this helps – if you think it’s too dry, you can kneed in a dab of joint compound. If it’s too sticky, dust it with a little corn starch and kneed.

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      • I didn’t knead the dough, so mine was sticky. It also got moist very quickly and became a bit unmanageable. Don’t get me wrong, I think it is a great recipe. I forgot to watch your video through. I think there is a possibility things may turn out better next time if I follow your instructions.

        I find, though, that like baking…paper mache can be affected by climate. For instance, a lot of people talk about the paper mach clay taking several days to dry. For me, it dries overnight. Florida’s heat is great for making things dry quickly (though that can be a problem sometimes–I had a problem when I put a clear coat on my car, for example). The problem is, the humidity can sometimes be a problem.

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        • That makes sense. I’ll bet a bit of corn starch will fix it right up. Florida heat sounds really nice right now. We had a blizzard this week, and there’s over a foot of new snow on the ground. Sigh…

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          • I always thought I would want to see snow. I’ve never seen it, being a second-generation native Floridian. The closest I got to snow was a freak hail storm, but most of it melted quickly as soon as it reached the ground.

            However, we’ve had colder winters lately–I don’t know why. Global shifting, the greenhouse effect, who knows? Anyway, I loved the colder weather, until it got around fifty degrees (and this above zero). Too cold for me, and I decided I would probably not like snow.

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            • You are 3 hours away from me. I live in Broward. I’m actually right on the Miami line. I just cross the street, and suddenly everybody speaks Spanish.

              I went to Key West once. Interesting place. Got a little creeped out by that story Elena story. Loved the cats that had the six toes–particularly Mr. Bette Davis, who must be dead by now.

    • I watched the new clay video also, but missed some of the nuances. My clay was too thick, and it slumped on my armature. I think i messed up my measurements because it took way to much cornstarch to get it to the point it was useable. Also it reminded me of concrete after it sets for a while, mine had water rising to the surface, so the feet of my little dog where way to mushy. I will try again. Your project is precious, good for you !!

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      • Monica, did you squish the water out of your toilet paper? And did you use the 1/2 cup of corn starch, then the 1 cup of all-purpose flour? I would be very curious to know why your batch came out so differently. Every batch I make takes a slightly different amount of flour, but I think that’s just because it’s impossible to squish the exact same amount of water out of the soaked paper every time. Also, the joint compound I have been using, from Walmart, has a lot more water in it than most.

        You didn’t happen to use Dap joint compound, did you?

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  7. Jonni they are great 🙂 They do have the features of baby bunnies. You have an awesome talent of catching an animal’s character, sweet baby bunnies. I’ll be looking forward to seeing updates.

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  8. You wouldn’t believe how many different techniques and designs I rejected before I finally decided how to make the doll heads for my new book. Oddly enough, the easiest technique for making the hollow armature also makes the cutest dolls. (I’m using a variation of the idea Barbara Bell gave us a few months ago, simplified to the point where she probably wouldn’t recognize it.)

    Now I’m hoping for some feedback. I anthropomorphized these little bunny heads even more than I usually do, because I’m trying to catch that newborn irresistability. Tell me if you think I’m on the right track. I haven’t sewn any bodies or clothes yet, (and I only have one ear so far) but I hope you can get the gist:

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      • They are ADORABLE! You got the newborn irresistability down pat! They look SO sweet, I can’t wait to see them finished.

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      • Yes, but you tinted the clay somehow into this perfect baby-bunny-face-colour, right?
        How did you do that, Jonni?

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        • No tint – it changes color as it dries, and more if it’s baked. Sort of honey-colored, unless I forget and leave it in the oven too long. I’ll paint them to match the cotton velour I bought for the bodies.

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      • These doll heads are really sweet Jonnie, and you captured the sweetness of a mini lop. My daughter has a mini lop , aged 4 who looks as if she were a babe(though heavier). I am curious though, how do you attach the ears, the body? I have no experience with making dolls. Also, will you include directions in your book as to how to sew the bodies etc? I sew as well so I can not wait for the book to come out. Even though my daughter is 22 she will love to receive a mini lop doll.

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        • Hi Eileen. Yes, the body and clothes will have patterns in the book. I’m not very good at sewing myself, but the patterns are very simple. The “hands” will have soft-sculpted paws, which are really cute. The ears are pulled through the hollow head and out two slits that are cut into the top or back of the head. No glue involved.

          Back 20 years ago when I sold similar dolls at art fairs, I can’t remember even one of them being sold as a child’s toy – they all ended up with adults, and most of the adult women buyers said they intended to keep theirs, rather than giving them away. Quite a few men bought them for their girlfriends’ birthday or Valentine’s day present. Supposedly… 🙂 (I think that watching all the people reacting to them at the fairs was the most enjoyable part of the whole process!)

          And now, I’d better get back to work. I have two chapters written now, but many more to go…

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    • I think it is very nice! I’ve never seen a newborn bunny, to tell you the truth, so I can’t judge on its accuracy. However, the details are wonderful.

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    • They are adorable. So you’re going to make the ears out of cloth? that’s a switch up for you. Hope it works out. Love the little faces.

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  9. This is another project I finished some time ago but didn’t take a photo of until now. I made the base with extra homemade clay I had made up to make the beak for the chicken sculpture. The model for this sculpture was a girl stray that my cat was in loved with, who sadly died after getting ran over. My cat was in love with her…or maybe just in lust–but their relationship was purely platonic since he is fixed. The baby is modeled after my cat.

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  10. I like him! I think it would be funny…though maybe not as attractive. People may not want to sit under a large moose behind coming from the wall.

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    • Yes, that is funny–and not bad to sit under.

      However, I would not allow any child psychologists into your home. Child psychologists are the enemies of creative people (believe me, I know from personal experience). You draw a monster stepping on a house because you were impressed by the Godzilla movie you saw, and they start saying all sorts of terrible things about you and your parents.

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  11. I finally finished my moose head, and some part of me thought it would be funny to have the rest of the moose to hang on the other side of the wall. I don’t think it turned out as funny as I thought it would, oh well. I’ll try to up load both photos.

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  12. This is a close-up of the dog. I forgot to get a close-up of the baby chicken. I’m going to upload the video to Youtube later and will leave the link.

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  13. Okay, so I’m going to try posting an image. I did this project for the vintage chicken in Jonni’s book “Make Paper Mache Animals” (I think that was the title). Originally, I was just doing this to practice my skills, and I wasn’t that passionate about the sculpture. However, she has wound up becoming a favorite…and she is one of the few I plan to keep.

    I finished her some time ago, but I only just now got the pictures made. I call the sculpture, “The Fowl Angelina Jolie.”

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  14. Here are the goslings with their proud mom. I will eventually put them both on that slab of wood but I am waiting for the wood to dry and be treated. It was fresh cut by my tree climber son.

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    • Lovely! What a nice sculpture, Eileen. Will you be leaving them outside? What did you put on them to protect them from rain and sun?

      Just a hint on the images – if you make them about twice as big, about 300 px wide, they will still get through the filter and they’ll be easier to see. Feel free to send again – and if you have any tips on how you made them, we’d love to hear them.

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      • I am trying the picture again to see if it is clearer. No- these guys will be indoor only. I have not put any efforts into making them waterproof as of yet- having too much fun doing the sculptures to spend time on experimenting!

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  15. Hi all! I promised to send a pis of the goslings I was working on. I don’t know how clear the picture will be as I had to mess with it to get the smaller size to send. Heres hoping!

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    • Oops – the image didn’t come through. It may have been too large – the system won’t accept really big photos. Could you try again?

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  16. Hello Jonni,

    I just finished my second paper mache project. “The Cow Jumped Over the Moon”. The cow is done in traditional paper mache and the moon was done using your shop towel method. If you would like to see other angles go to my blog: debracooper.blogspot.com

    Unfortunately I did not take any in progress photos. Would love to know what you think.

    Reply
    • This would be absolutely adorable in a child’s bedroom! What a brilliant idea and the man in the moon looks very welcoming toward the cow. 🙂 Love it!

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    • That is beautiful and if you got the strings Photoshopped out would make a great illustration for a children’s book. This is gorgeous.

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    • Thank you everyone for such wonderful comments. It was a fun project to work on.
      Terry: the craters where created using little circle of cardboard under the shop towels.
      Donna: this may be a gift for my niece who is have a baby boy this summer (hence the blue moon). if not, i would probably sell it.
      Christine: the cow and moon are hanging on wood panel wall, so there are no strings involved. I have a wire loop on the back of the cow and a wire string on the back of the moon held in place with epoxy.

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      • I was thinking more of the background with the lines. I guess the photographer in me sees things differently. What I would have done is gotten a flat green sheet or board and put the cow and the moon on it and shot over it straight down. That way you could have Photoshopped the green area out and made your own illustration for a book or poster showing the night and stars or other backgrounds. Then I would have hung the pieces on the wall after I shot the photos on the green background. I am a person who likes the wiggle room of possibilities and this really screams possibilities. They go together like water and sand, they make mud and I have spent a lot of my youth happily in the mud.

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        • Christine, hey that IS a really good idea, thank you for the suggestion! I really can picture that, combining the 3D art with an illustration and what a cute poster it could be! Now you have me rethinking some other things as well. Oh fun, thanks again.

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