Daily Sculptors Page

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15,067 thoughts on “Daily Sculptors Group Page”

  1. Here is my latest tapir. He is a sassy little thing. Shelbot and I had a contest (I think like last year – we are both slow), and we were to paint them with bright colors and different. I tried bright colors, but in the end I didn’t like it so went back to a traditional view. I hope some day he finishes his so I can see the lighter side of things. (The tongue is hanging out on the other side.)

    Christine, do I get a C for improving my background? I really do appreciate your suggestions, and who knows, some day may even have lights! Thanks.

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      • The contest can’t begin until we see Shelbot’s tapir! I’m trying to blackmail him into finishing his, which will no doubt follow the rules of being colorful and unusual. I love his painting.

        Thank you for your comments.

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    • He is b-u-tiful, Rex. Just love his colours and the stance! What size, please. I find that with a photo, I need something to tell me how big/small something is before I can really visualize it, but big or small he’s lovely.
      Joyce

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      • Thanks, Joyce. To the top of his head, he is 8″ high. I put him next to the one I made last year for the county fair, and he seems right at home. Surprised me a little. The bigger one is 18″ tall.

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    • Ok Rex knock off the age stuff as I’m gaining to be 70 next month. I only feel 50. By the way I love the colors

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    • Hi Rex, no, you get an A+. The two tones seperate the sculpture from the floor to the wall and give good seperation. You also shot at the level of the sculpture which give nice detail. The light blue does not fight with the colors of the tapir which shows of the sculpture very nicely. By the way the sculpture itself is one of my favorites. I love your work and this really ranks high on my list. It is beautiful.

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      • And Rex, you zoomed in and isolated the sculpture so one looking at the photo get to see the details of your sculpture. If you were to publish the photo in any magazine or website, this will really be a standout.

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      • Thank you so much, Christine. I also got a chuckle as well. I have long appreciated your helpfulness to everyone in taking good photographs of their pieces of art. Glad you like “Oliver!”

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  2. One of my favorite movies The Maltese Falcon. So decided to sculpt my own. As Sam spade says “the stuff dreams are made of”.

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      • A lovely sculpture, Alan…the name brings forth a lot of images, but mostly Peter Lorre. Or are most people too young to remember him?
        Joyce

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    • First, I love the falcon. I like the design and the intricate work.

      (I must say I have read many of Hammett’s books, but not this one. I ordered it today. When I was 27, now 72!, I had a dear friend who was 60. She called me Sam Spade all the time, and I have no idea why. I hope the book will give me some answers. She developed Alzheimer’s, so even though I tried to do many things with her, she was gone. Thanks you so much. Love your work.0

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      • Thanks so much Rex for the kind words. I’ve not read the book but have seen the movie more times than I can count. I hope it gives you the answers so you can “reconnect” with your dear friend.

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      • Hi, Jonni, me again. I sent my info to you on the wrong link. My caricatures are made of poly clay the wall is made of paper egg cartons. I do many of these for clients. I was just showing you what I do between paper Mache projects. You asked if I have another big project coming up. I do, maybe a large animal to sit on the log beam in my living room. I did see your large cheetah. I love that.

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    • Nancy, that is really nice. I love the figures. (What I really want to know is what that chicken-like thing is behind them? lol)

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      • Hi Rex
        That chicken is a chicken?. It’s just something I bought years ago before I started paper mache. If you want a picture I’ll send one.

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        • Nancy, I ought to have a reputation on this site for seeing things in the background. I know what Christine is saying, and I am sure it only takes a second to make a great backdrop — and no question it makes the photographs more focused and dramatic — but I’m too old now! I have taken photography classes, so I know she is correct. Every time I take a photo of anything, I think of Christine and her great (and free) advice. Admire the heck out of it.

          When I get good enough at paper mache, I want to make one of a rooster we had, Frederick the White Rooster. He was so funny, very skinny, picked on my all the other chickens, but his crow was so wonderful and funny. I really didn’t know what was in your photo and just sort of made it up. Thanks so much.

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          • Oh, it’s been a long time since I hated anyone! I am so jealous. They are great. My baby brother Ted picked up his chicken and fish yesterday, and I told him some day I hope to make him a real chicken, and here they are! Thanks so much for the post. They are really lovely. Thanks.

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      • Well Rex and Nancy, I stand by my post that if you want the sculpture to stand out on its own you have to seperate the different subjects. The point of your photo was the group sculpture yet Rex’s eyes went to the chicken in the background, which proves my point about eyeball space. Because you have green and browns a very light blue sheet or poster board would have made the sculpture stand out on its own. What I have done in the past, is get one of those flat boards from Ace hardware or Lowes and have th em cut the board into three feet by three feet and paint them in colors of blue. light blue, green and light green.
        They are hardy and can be put away out of sight. Yet when needed can be set up in seconds. Poster board can be used the same way. this is great for small sculptures and the eyes can focus on the sculpture and not the background unless it is part of the statement you want to make. It does not take talent to photograph sculptures just a little bit of your time to set up.

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        • One rule in taking photos such as the family group is not to shoot up but set the camera level of the sculpture and to shoot close up. You cabn either use the macro setting or back up a little and zoom in. That way you can get the focus really sharp. I have used a $60.00 Nikon point and shoot for my doll photography and have gotten some great photos. In making a post, the goal is to show the details. It also helps make the background not in focus ; in short you want to blur your background as not to have it compete with your main subject. Try if you can to put the sculpture in front of the window to get better light. Here are some examples of what I have done in terms of equipment. In photo 1 I used paint floor covering paper I bought at Lowes for not much money. The vessel is being lighted by a window on the left side of the set up. This was meant to be a more permanent light box made out of pvc pipe but it did not work as I wanted it to. I ended making a table out of it. Photo 2 is the close up. The reason I shot high is to show the inside of the vessel to give it depth. If I did not, it would have looked like it was floating. the paper round at the bottom anchors the vessel and gives separation of the vessel and the brown paper. Photo number three shows what I tried to do in making a light tent. I am glad I made it as I learned: 1. do not try this on the high noon sun, the shadows are so pronounced and if I wanted to use the sheet for the project cut it up and make a tight fitted cover for the light box. This one ended up being a table. Photo number 4 I wanted to make my own home studio on a budget and belive me this is not hard to do. What I started out with is buying this two light reflectors and 900 lumins and 40 watts full spectrum lights. The two sets of pvc pipe in the plaster of paris were for use for photo purposes only anbd never used in a studio setting. For that I went to YouTube and got this project: Make a PVC Light Stand for under 5 (dollars). It is portable, can be taken apart. I have used that set up to take photos at the Belfair community center for the Easter egg hunt and for Halloween. I bought 1,000 lumins light for my portable studio for $34.00 each. Professional lights cost about $60.00 to $80.00 up to 1,000. these all worked very well. Photo 5 is a cardboard light box which makes small items to be photographed have better diffused lighting. Again there are many sites on the internet that show how to use the light box and to light the box to get the effect you want. Sometimes, I just put a big sheet on the wall and cover wall hangings and stuff and use it for a background. Talent is not needed, just your why. Why are you posting if you want your work to be seen? What is your goal? Your sculpture is your work of art and what do you want your audience to see?

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          • Thanks Christine, you have taught me so much about photographing sculptures over the years. What would we do without you?

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    • I thought when I first saw these that they were made from polymer clay. Nicely done. Makes my fingers yearn to do some sculpting. Can fingers yearn?
      Joyce

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  3. Hi Jonni! I’ve been following your site for years excited to share what I’ve been working on. I started a larger project a few months ago and thought I’d do something easy to warm up. I saw a beautiful ‘tentacle-sticking-out-of-a-porthole’ sculpture at Monterey Bay aquarium last Summer and was inspired. Just a twist and taper shaped thing, no problem I thought…boy was I a sucker. 144 suckers later, each smaller than the previous, I’m happy I made the effort!

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      • Thank you! The armature is 18 gauge aluminum wire from the hardware store. Started with one piece but had to reinforce the larger twist after a layer of paper mache. Then it’s just newspaper and masking tape. The suckers were the tough part. Couple weeks of trial and error until I figured out how I could roll strips of single-face corrugated cardboard into suction cups and by trimming the length a little for each pair got the descending size. Whew!

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  4. Well Spring prop making is upon us. I got a very challenging task this year. Make cinderella’s pumpkin cart. I was very overwhelmed but pool noodles, blue paper towels and ultimate paper mâché. made this light, yet o so strong Cinderella Carriage. it worked so fabulously to create the stem too!

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    • Sarah, your pumpkin cart is wonderful! Did you build it on a trailer so it can go in a parade, or is it going to be used in a theater production? I don’t suppose you took progress photos? If you did and you’d like to write a guest post for us, just let me know.

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      • I do have a few progress photos. A blog post would be fun.
        It’s built on a metal garden wagon, for my daughter’s Ballet school. They love that it is so light!
        I get to de-construct it as well. As it won’t fit as is in the storage unit. Or it would be in the next parade the school is in 🙂 it might be if I deconstruct it well enough.

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    • Yeah, that’s great. Anything to do with pumpkins, and my ears perk up. I like the design a lot. (I have three full-sized pumpkins I made sitting in my living area year round.)

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  5. Jonni
    Is your paper mache clay weatherproof?
    What if an exterior glue replaced PVA?
    What if an exterior paint was added?
    I know you have a recipe for weatherproof pm but I’m thinking it’s a bit expensive.

    Mostly I make wooden automata.
    Here is a ceramic automata: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3kwjZVbnrU
    My goal is a paper mache automata because its malleable & light.

    Barry

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    • No, the paper mache clay is not waterproof. And I don’t have a recipe for waterproof paper mache. I wish I did, but I haven’t figured it out. I don’t know if a carpenter’s glue would make the recipe waterproof, but my instincts say ‘no.’ However, Dan Reeder has a cloth mache dragon that’s been outside in Seattle rain for years, and it seems to be holding up well. One of these days I intend to try his technique. He used outdoor glue, I think. I know there’s an article about his dragon, but whenever I go back to Google to search for I don’t find it. Does anyone have a link?

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      • This is from Dan Reeder:
        “So what did I do? I used “exterior” grade wood glue instead of flour and water paste for the initial paper mache stage. Then I used the same glue for the “cloth mache” skin. Then I painted the project with exterior grade paints. Some people have tried sealants. I have too. I don’t like them. They change the paint. The clear layer takes away any subtlety in the color. Who wants something that lasts forever if it looks bad?”

        I have also seen a video on Flexbond but it’s too expensive for me.

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    • I bow before the Mistress of Fast Faces. Thank you so much for showing them. I love them all, but that middle one is Mr. Ego, for sure. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I hope more are coming.

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    • The emotions and characteristics that come out of them are great. Every one of them could be a character in a novel. (I’ve been reading a bunch of plays by Eugene O’Neill, and these two could be the poster faces.) They make my day brighter.

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    • Yes. My first thought, “KEEP TRYING.” I think every project is trying, but I would love to know everything about her! Thanks.

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    • Hi Nancy, your piece is wonderful and I think it shows a lot of creativity. I have been a fan of this site for many years and if there is one thing that Jonni and her regulars will tell you I am the photo critic of this site as I am very picky, but for a good reason. If one is to post a photo of their work it is nice that the sculpture does not fight for eyeball space so to speak. One of the many transgressions I see, is the fact people do not look at the backgrounds and see other objects that make the photo very busy and wash out the details of a sculpture. In your photo, the window, flowers and the desk add elements that make focusing on Irma less palpable. The eyes go from Irma to the flowers. The electrical coduit fights for the shape of the dowl stick skirt. I have to concentrate hard to really see the details. If you had just put her behind a blank wall she would have stood out on her own. In sculpture photography you want your piece to stand out. I white ironed sheet in the background or blue and you would have a nice separation from the everyday background and foreground. I have been in photography since 1978 and I have posted a lot of photos in this site. The background is busy and the eye goes to the flowers, the desk, the glass window and I have to really concentrate on the sculpture to really get the wonderful details you put into the piece. Your piece is a work of art I would really like to see her get the eye space she deserves.

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      • Hi Christine,
        I really appreciate your comments about my pics. Photography skills ar minimal, no talent at all. My pics are take for personal use on my iPad for reference only. Now you’re making me think about it,I’ll try to do better. You may have created a monster. Thanks for your help. I do appreciate you.

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      • Hi Christine,
        You are very right about setting up for pictures a bit better. I will pay more attention next time for my pictures.

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  6. It’s been awhile since I’ve sent anything but I’ve been doing a lot of beading. My girl is inspired from Akita Blount. Her work is much smaller compared to my 5’ 4” tall doll. Her namer is Irma the bird girl. Her body And head is paper mache face is then covered with porcelain air dry clay. The cage is dowl sticks and bendable pvc water tubeing wrapped in floral tape is just stained and the birds poly clay. The skirt is brown butcher paper painted and antiqued brown over mustard color.

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  7. Hi Jonni. Here one of my outdoor cement sculptures. These are the carved 2” blue foam armature with the steel wool and cement wraps. Finish is the Golden artist acrylic with Goldens UV resistant varnish. The two figures hugging is about 3’Dx 4’ L x 3’H. I’m looking forward to making paper mache which might be less painful or less messy. Lol.

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    • Hi Deb. I’m afraid your photos didn’t come through. Can you make the file size smaller? We really want to see those sculptures. There are a couple of options for making them smaller in the notes at the top of the page. I’m sorry it didn’t work, but I do hope you’ll try again!

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  8. Hello everyone. I haven’t posted for a while, very busy. Love all the new sculpts I’ve been seeing. Extremely talented artists Here a a Winston Churchill I’ve beennworking on.

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      • Linda, I know you are just trying to make me feel guilty. When my friend came from the British Isles years ago, she saw her first Mountain Bluebird. Last year when she came to visit, she asked me to make her one. Not yet, even though I put paper and masking tape to the beginning step. Wonderful little thing. I love it. My dog Teca and I walk a few times a day, and the birds are out singing, and it is a wonderful reminder of Spring (although today is cold, windy, and trying to rain). Thanks.

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        • Rex, Thank you for the kind words. The Eastern Blue Bird is my favorite. I have, what I call my “ bird tree” it’s a pole with 4 feeders on it & every morning I get to sit on my porch & watch all the different birds come to feed. I have truly been blessed. That’s what inspired me to make the little fat guy Haha. So thank you & thanks to Jonni for this wonderful web site & sharing her skill & knowledge

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    • I admire that more than I can say. Really great job, and he stands. Awesome!

      I can’t say how many “horses” I have tried, and yours is wonderful and makes me jealous!

      Are you going to “paint” him, not that he needs it at all.

      And I could use a few of those bins at the top of the photo!

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      • Hi Rex,
        thanks so much for your comments. I think I will give my horse another coat of paste wax in a darker color. His color could be better.

        I am new to this blogging, so am trying sending a pic of a horse I did about 4 years ago, before I knew about Jonni’s paper mache clay. The new pic has plaster cloth skin, then paste wax sealed.

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    • Excellent work! I’m building a full-size horse/unicorn and appreciate how well you’ve done the joints and proportions. Great job with the clay coat and surface! Thanks for sharing.

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        • Hi Vera,
          I don’t have room to keep a horse indoors so it’ll have to go outside at least sometime! I’m pretty far along, finally started papering, but it’s been a process figuring out how to build the structure. Lots of tear downs and re-dos. I could post a pic if you’re interested.

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  9. Hi Jonni,

    Here is a picture of my finished paper mache sculpture of a rearing stallion. He is 27″ tall and is free-standing using his tail as a third support. Inside he is made with a wire and plaster cloth armature. Bulked out with plastic shopping bags and masking tape. Then torn paper and glue. to give a firm, smooth shape. Then coated with paper mache clay using your recipe. He is sealed with with a couple of coats of Minwax paste finishing wax. I appreciate your site so much. Am learning so many different materials and ways to home-build sculptures.

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  10. Thank you everyone. Joni, I cannot find the rest of my pictures that I took during the making of Poseidon. I do have this one that I took before I added the crown. Basically, I started with a piece of cardboard that I cut into the silhouette of Poseidon. Then I build up the chest, neck, and head this newspaper and masking tape. I taped a blank mask to my head form to make sure everything was in a the right position. Next, I added 2 layers of paper mache and then 1 layer of paper mache clay and formed the details. For the crown, I ripped off one side of a piece of cardboard so I would have a corrugated metal look. I used paper mache clay to make the starfish, barnacles, the spikes/tines of the crown. I finished it up using acrylic paints.

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  11. Hi Jonni, hi everyone!
    I’m pleased to show you my 2018 dolls! They became less intellectually heavy as I’m now into putting some movement and fun through some sort of caricature kind of approach.
    These were way more fun to built.
    Technical wise I made some models, made some silicone+starch casts from them and can fill all with papermache, mount the halves into 1 (legs, torso), cover some bits with das clay (depending where I want the smooth surfaces), tailor clothes from used printing paper, wigs from toilet paper and, well, have fun overall!
    Thank you 🙂

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    • They’re wonderful, Pedro – as always. I really like the playfulness you’ve added – it’s obvious that you enjoyed making them, and they’ll put a smile on someone’s face every time they see your sculptures sitting in an honored place in their home. Assuming, of course, they’re for sale?

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      • Indeed they are, in fact I’ve took them to a local antique/gallery shop and today is their debut into a physical idea of commerce (instead of online commerce), we’ll see how it goes …
        Thanks for such inspiring review Jonni, I’ll make some more then 😀

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    • Again Pedro, such details! They are wonderful-I especially love the wigs. You also captured the somewhat arrogant expressions on their faces! Very nice!

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        • Pedro, as you might know, I do stained glass (used to do a lot of it). My sister said, “I don’t know how you have the patience for that.” I told her, “I don’t know how you have the patience for quilting.” So, I’m sure one persons “boring” is another person’s excitement, and I’m sure I would “cowboy up” if I had to do one of these wigs! (“Cowboy up” is an expression here in the wild west that means get on the horse and get going.) Thanks for the laugh.

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    • I worked! Your hippo looks like he’s sparkling – how did you get that look? Did you use a metallic paint? (Or am I just seeing things? That happens after spending too long on the computer… 🙂 )

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    • It’s artists like you that make me think I ought to lighten up! I do like it, sparkles and all. Thanks for sharing with us. I love seeing it.

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  12. Hello Jonni,
    It has been a while since I last posted. I have been meaning to post this for a while now, but keep forgetting. This is my rendition of Poseidon. This is by far one of the most detailed paper mache works that I have created. Newspapers and and layers of paper mache to create the form and then a layer of paper mache clay to add depth and details. The shoulders got a little wide, but over all I love the final product.

    Reply

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