Paper Mache Clay

Several years ago I developed a new recipe for a sculptural material I call “paper mache clay.” This material is so easy to use and so easy to make that I now use it exclusively for all my paper mache sculptures. The recipe has now gone “viral” and is being used by artists all over the world.

It might be a bit more accurate to call this material “home-made air-dried cellulose-reinforced polymer clay,” but that’s way too hard to say (or type!), so for now, let’s just call it paper mache clay.

Make Animal Sculptures with Paper Mache ClayThe first video below shows how to make the paper mache clay, and the second video answers some common questions that I’ve received from readers since I first developed this recipe. Below the videos you’ll find the recipe written out, and a few comments about how it’s used. (This recipe is the basis for my book “Make Animal Sculptures with Paper Mache Clay.”)

 

I usually make mine fairly thin so it can be spread over an armature like frosting, by using less flour than the recipe calls for – but you can also make it thicker, with more flour, when you want more control over the modeling process. The clay dries extremely hard when applied in a very thin layer (1/8 to 1/4″ thick), and it seems to dry much faster than traditional paper mache pulp. (And it only takes about 5 minutes to make).

Paper Mache Clay on Snow Leopard Sculpture
Paper Mache Clay on Snow Leopard Sculpture

As you can see above, the clay can be modeled into fairly fine details. Using the clay for modeling feels much more intuitive than creating sculptures with paper strips and paste, and once the clay is dry it is a pleasure to paint.

The ingredients are inexpensive, and can be found at your local grocery store and hardware store. You will need:

  • Cheap toilet paper (measure the wet paper pulp, and use 1 1/4 cups – some rolls contain more paper than needed)
  • 1 cup Joint compound from the hardware store (get premixed “regular,” that comes in a plastic tub, not the dry powder form.) (Not sure what Joint compound is, or what it’s called in your country? click here.) Note: buy any brand except DAP. The DAP brand does not work.
  • 3/4 cup Elmer’s Glue-all (PVA glue)
  • 1/2 cup White Flour
  • 2 tablespoons Linseed Oil or Mineral Oil (Linseed oil contains chemicals, so mineral oil is a better choice if you’re working with kids, or if you like to get your hands in the clay)

See the video below for details on making your clay. And if you try this recipe, please let us all know what you think of it–and also please share a photo of your finished work. We’d love to see how it comes out. (Can’t see the video? See the instructions printed below).

[Edit 2/12/2011 -  If you find that your clay seems "rubbery" instead of smooth and creamy, you may need to use a different brand of joint compound. They all make their products using different formulas. Most of them work, but if you find one that doesn't, please let us know. ]

Making Your Paper Mache Clay

Tools:

You’ll also need a large bowl, (use one with high sides so you don’t splatter clay on your cupboards), an electric mixer, a measuring cup and a tablespoon measure. To keep t he finished clay from drying out, you’ll need an air-tight container. The recipe makes approximately 1 quart of paper mache clay.

Note about Toilet Paper:

Unfortunately, the people who make toilet paper don’t expect us to turn their product into great works of art, so they see no reason to include the kind of information that would make things a lot easier for us.

I use a brand called “Angel Soft,” in the “regular” 2-ply rolls. I buy it at my local Wal-Mart. Each roll contains approximately 1 1/4 cup of paper, which I measured by wetting the paper, squeezing out the water, and then firmly squishing it into a measuring cup.

Since brands differ so much, the first time you make this recipe you should take a few minutes to find out how much paper is in the first roll. Then adjust the recipe if your brand don’t contain about 1 1/4 cup of paper. Fortunately, this is not a chemistry experiment or rocket science – if your mixture contains a little more paper than mine, or a little less, your sculptures will still be stunning.

Step 1. Fill a high-sided bowl with warm water. Remove the toilet paper from the roll and throw it into the water. Push down on the paper to make sure all of it gets wet.

Step 2. Then pick up the paper and squeeze out as much water as you can. Pour the water out of the bowl and put your paper mass back in.

Step 3. You will want to break the paper into chunks about 1″ across. This will allow your mixer to move around the pieces and break them apart.

Step 4. Add all the ingredients to the bowl and mix, using an electric mixer. The mixer will pull the fibers of the toilet paper apart and turn it into pulp. Continue to mix for at least 3 minutes to make sure all the paper has been mixed in with the other ingredients. If you still see some lumps, use a fork or your fingers (with the mixer turned off!) to break them apart, and then mix some more.

Your paper mache clay is now ready to use. It will look a bit like cookie dough – but don’t eat it!

If you don’t plan to use your clay right away, place it in an airtight container to keep it from drying out. The clay should stay usable for 5 days or more, if you keep it covered. The recipe makes about 1 quart.

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3,473 Responses

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  1. Rhet
    Rhet at |

    Using food-grade or pharmaceutical grade calcium carbonate will probably not be cost-effective — the requirements for those substances include things that industrial grade or construction grade materials do not have to follow [because, unsurprisingly, people aren't supposed to eat plaster or spackle].

    You might, though, see if there are any garden supply places that might have the stuff for use as a soil amendment…

    Reply
  2. Hobby Panda | Blog | Paper mache clay recipe. Great paper mache recipe for paper mache projects

    [...] Read the paper mache recipe here:  ultimatepapermache.com/paper-mache-clay [...]

  3. Marty Chamberlain
    Marty Chamberlain at |

    Nice site, love paper maché. My mother made a similar compound when I was a child, but sans the joint compound and the linseed oil.. I am definitely going try this method. Your work is excellent!

    Reply
  4. Susan
    Susan at |

    I just mixed my very first batch of clay from the recipe. It seems a little sticky.
    I can’t imagine that it would be easy to work with if it’s sticky..and I have to scrape it off my fingers. Should I add more flour? Also, in this recipe, you say to use one roll of toilet paper, but on the you tube page I found the recipe again and it says to use 2 rolls. The one roll easily made 1 and 1/4 cups of wet paper..
    I guess I’ll need more practice here..

    Thanks, Susan

    Reply
  5. Sarah B.
    Sarah B. at |

    I came across this recipe and am very excited to try it out, however I purchased some joint compound from my local Home Depot and on the label it says things like “Harmful if inhaled” and “this product contains chemicals linked to cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.” Are you sure that this is safe to work with bare-handed?

    Reply
    1. Carmelina
      Carmelina at |

      Hi Sarah B. I know your concerns with joint compound. As long as you wear gloves to mix it thoroughly it should be fine. THERE IS A POWDERED NON TOXIC SUBSTANCE YOU CAN USE THAT I CAME ACROSS 2 MONTHS AGO AND POSTED ON HERE!! ITS CALLED ACTIVA PLASTER OF PARIS NON TOXIC!! KIDS USE IT IN SCHOOL!!! IT’S SAFE!! It is powedered and when you initially pour it in the mixutre wear a mask and gloves to mix it in thoroughly!! It can be handled and shaped to your liking without the worry of toxicity on the skin. The reason why I wear a mask is that it’s powedered and it can get in the air and irritate the lungs unless you are careful mixing. BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY IT’S NON TOXIC which i do like!!! AND IT CAN BE HANDLED!! Experiment with it!! I plan on making a batch using this stuff. I have tested it out and do like the texture of the clay with this activa POP!!! HAVE FUN!!

      Reply
      1. Sarah B.
        Sarah B. at |

        I think I’d prefer to use that since I have a 2-year-old running around the house. When you mix it in, do you use the same amount as the joint compound (1 cup)?

        Reply
  6. Leah
    Leah at |

    are you using pipe joint compound or sheet rock? thanks for the tips, Jonni!
    ~Leah
    and how long does it take to dry?

    Reply
  7. Carol
    Carol at |

    This looks wonderful! I think I’ll give it a try. I don’t have the facilities to use my soft pastels any more (dust has to be contained) so I am always looking for new and creative ways to create. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Reply
  8. Aysha
    Aysha at |

    The paper mache clay was great! I had a lot of fun working with it. Not like other recipes, which turn out quite messy(probably just for me, because i’m a beginner!) This is my first project…Its a venetian mask. I’ve put it up here:
    http://ayshasamrin.weebly.com/my-showcase.html

    You may have to scroll down up to mid-page…

    Reply
  9. Leah
    Leah at |

    i love this recipe! but do you make the paper frame like you normally would and then do the clay on top rather than layers of news paper, or does it go over the layers of news paper and glue?
    thanks!
    ~leah

    Reply
    1. Leah
      Leah at |

      and can it actually be sculpted into ears and eyes and things or is it just and over coat to smooth things out??? thanks!

      Reply
      1. Carmelina
        Carmelina at |

        Not sure if you are asking Jonni this question or me but here is my response. It’s your choice. I like to make the hard shell paper mache (like 3 layers) on my armature then wait a day or two for it to dry. I then put the Jonni Clay on the hard shell and make my form. Yes you can form ears, noses ect. The best clay to use for detail and smoothness, though, is creative paper clay (pricey unless you have a coupon) you buy in the craft stores. YEP I LOVE CAPS!!! LOL! D YESSSSSSSSSS I LOVE HALLOWEEN!!!!! I will post my skull here pretty soon!! Have fun!!

        Reply
  10. Valdja
    Valdja at |

    Amei a idéia dessa massa.Obrigada

    Reply
  11. Nikki
    Nikki at |

    I agree with the comments above, Jonni. I think you are a natural teacher. So go share your talents and help others fortunate enough to be in a class with you!

    Reply
  12. Chris
    Chris at |

    HI Jonni
    I would say.. GIVE YOUR ART CLASSES. You are so sharing on here, I am sure it would come though in person. I have given, and been to a few sculpture classes. (for amature wannabe’s like me) and the most important thing is encouragement, for those who don’t feel confident, once you can get people to believe in themselves, there is no stopping them.
    Chris

    Reply
    1. Carmelina
      Carmelina at |

      OMG!! HOW WEIRD YOU TALK ABOUT CONFIDENCE, CHRIS!! I HAD A DREAM TWO NIGHTS AGO TELLING MYSELF I LACK CONFIDENCE!! HOW STRANGE!! I actually do and wanted to quit doing paper mache BUT NOT A CHANCE!! I love doing this stuff!! As for Jonni, Chris hit it right on!!! TEACH ART JONNI!! YOU ARE VERY GOOD AT IT!!!
      Just a note, I plan on making little pumpkins with fake tee lights. It’s going to be cool.

      Reply
    2. Leah
      Leah at |

      how cool! i wish we had sculpture classes around here…
      (((day-dreamy sigh)))

      Reply
  13. Carin
    Carin at |

    Hi I am from South Africa, I was looking on the website on how to make large paper mache animals (I hold art classess for kids and adults) And I myself have always wanted to make a large animal out of paper mache – so there I was browings and Ivery pleasantly came across you guys. But also to my surprise and delight I see you use clay to finish the product off and the recipe WOW i was excitted. I have one question (It might be an ignorant one but have to ask it any how) and you have the clay on – then what. Is it hard, waterproof, finnished? or is there more to the process – like painting it with a varnish to harden or …….? Its 10:30 here in Cape Town – and winter is setting in Dark and not too cold yet.
    Love to hear from you guys – all seem like such a friendly sharing caring group.
    Best
    Carin Maehr (I have a website but its for training adults in soft skills) http://www.abouttraining.co.za
    So Art is my passion – and love since a child

    Reply
  14. Emily Lomax
    Emily Lomax at |

    Thanks so much for the clay recipe! I am doing a treehouse doll house for my daughter and I feel if i hadn’t found your site I may have given up doing it the old way as it is such a big project. With your recipe I covered the whole tree in one afternoon and it is drying really well. It actually worked really well for the bark texture. Thanks again it was really clever to come up with it. :)

    Reply
  15. Melis
    Melis at |

    hi, i tried your clay recipe today but it was so hard and did not even form a compound. i put more glue and even some water. can yo help me because i have an order this week. and one more question. in real life what do you use joint compound for? i am in Turkey and i couldnt find the name in Turkish. maybe it may help. thanks

    Reply
  16. kendra
    kendra at |

    I am wanting to try and use the clay to make a giant cracked easter egg to put my 2 and 4 yr old in to take pics for their bday .. any pointers before I start, gonna be a BIG job

    Reply
  17. Amey Bhide
    Amey Bhide at |

    Hello Jonni ! This is an awesome website and resource that you have created here. I really like how you freely share all your knowledge, experience and tutorials without having any secrets or withholding crucial information. I am myself a very amateur papermache hobbyist and I started with this hobby when I was just 8 years old. Since then I have made many things, most notably two turtles and an egyptian canopic jar. I am now going to buy your book and again start with a small project, thank you so very much for all the inspiration and help.

    Regards Amey

    Reply
  18. Jennifer Bruner
    Jennifer Bruner at |

    I have read through a lot of comments, but I am NOT a crafty person, so I will ask anyway! Can I use the clay method to cover a balloon shape for a pinata? Is it too strong for kids to break open? We would be making it as a cub scout project…so the clay seems good as we can cover the balloon in one night! Thanks….I will try this no matter what with my own kids!

    Reply
    1. Carmelina
      Carmelina at |

      Hi Jennifer,

      The pinata will be too hard for the boys to break. Jonni’s clay is pretty tough. My sister, making her pinata for the first time, put 3 layers of paper mache (no clay) on hers. Two days later she pinned it up and the kids couldn’t break it NOT EVEN HER HUSBAND! LOL! 1 layer of paper mache will do (no clay needed). Check out Jonni’s recipe on paper mache paste : ) Have fun!!

      Reply
      1. Leah
        Leah at |

        be careful with pinatas, though. one time i made one that looked like a pineapple for a birthday party, and the leaves on top of the pinata were connected to the wire that held it up. we go it up there, hit it once, and the bottom fell off and just the leaves stayed havging in the tree. now what i do is i do one layer of paper mache, then wrap the whole thing lightly in dental floss so the top and the bottom stay connected. i then do one more layer of papermache with really watered down glue just to make it look smoother but still be breakable. have fun with your pinata and good luck. boy scouts are a blast and will have fun with this project.
        ~Leah

        Reply
  19. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    OOPS Hopefully you can view these pics
    Here are the pics : )
    Pic #1- Armature covered with paper mache
    Pic #2- Jonni/Debbie Clay on JackO (his name)
    Pic #3- JackO painted black
    Pic #4,5,6- JackO dry brushed with Dragon fire orange

    Reply
    1. Debbie Vandeventer
      Debbie Vandeventer at |

      Love the pumpkin!! Great job, Carmelina!! :)

      Debbie

      Reply
    2. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Very nice Carmelina, well done…nice pictures too!

      Note to Jonni:
      The link in your reply “click here to see the photos” doesn’t work for me but instead takes me to this page, “You 404’d it. Gnarly, dude.” FYI

      Reply
  20. Alise
    Alise at |

    Is there a particular brand of joint compound you use or would recommend? Thanks!

    Reply
  21. Howard Gardener
    Howard Gardener at |

    Hi Jonni,

    I’ve been using the paper clay recipe for a few projects now – marvellous! I tried it out by making a large wasp and used the recipe for both the wasp and parts of the setting.

    You can also see start of the latest project on there: giant digestive biscuits! These are being cast in sturdy cardboard moulds. The finished result will be a 400% sculpture of a packet of biscuits. The beauty of this particular project is that the slightly rough texture of the dried clay looks perfect on the scaled up biscuit, so there’s very little finishing to do. The biscuits are 27mm thick and are consequently taking quite some time to dry and the kitchen looks like a production line! Great site!

    Reply
  22. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    HI JONNI & ALL MY PAIPER MACHE FRIENDS,
    I AM ALMOST FINISHED WITH MY HALLOWEEN PUMPKIN!!! I POST IT HERE SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOON!!! How do I post the pics here? Also, the inside of the pumpkin has loose paper strips, do I yank those out or leave them? if I leave them, the rotting process will begin. Shall I spray the inside with acrylic? if I do spray inside, will I still be able to place a small light to make my Jacko light up at night? OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I have more ideas like scary skeletal creatures and zombies!!!! YOU ARE AN INSPIRATION, JONNI!! : )

    Reply
  23. Leonardo Hingst Baião
    Leonardo Hingst Baião at |

    I was just looking for papier mache tutorials in the net and ended up here. I just saw the elephant video and it was amazing. I´m from Brazil and I own a small school of samba in my city (like the ones you might have seen or heard during the carnaval parade in Rio de Janeiro) and to do the scupltures I usually use styrofoam carved with blades and painted with resines which causes the price to be astronomic for us (over US$ 700). I would like to try your elephant technique to do a 11 ft (eleven feet -we don´t use this tipe metrics so is close to 3,5m) brazilian jaguar and see how it goes-to put on a parade car. What do you recomend to do to make the structure firm enougth to suport its wheight? Can I use some wire to reenforce it? After I´m done with the jaguar I´ll try to do an indian over 15 ft (close to 4,5m ???) so that comes another question: is this clay better do do faces?. I hope you can aswer me, it´s the first time I´ll try mache. Thank you.

    Reply
  24. Donna
    Donna at |

    Hi. Your site is so much fun to look at. I was hoping to do a novel craft with my granddaughters. I was thinking about having the girls “sculpt” scenery on a firm canvas, let it dry and then paint it with acrylic paints for a 3D picture. Do you think this would work with your papier mache clay?
    Donna

    Reply
    1. deyana
      deyana at |

      Hi Donna,
      I just did something similar with my 4-5 years old son. I didn’t use the paper mache clay, as I still don’t know what kind of ingredients are here, in Thailand – for the ones in the recipe. I will try to make time to find out. We live on “the move” the last 5 years and soon we go to Europe for 3 months , when we come back here I may find out, or may be I find the time in Sweden to try the clay.
      I just want to tell you now about some of the accessories I did – I made a hut out if very fine brunches, glued on the bottom of a plastic yogurt dish (cut a hole for the door first) and the roof – on a form from thick paper – needs patience and a fast, quick glue. I did lather from brunches too – I connected all the parts with a tread – twisted many times around each connection. We made a fence from ice cream picks,( the base could be the clay, but we had another), we made a tree and a fire from the same fine brunches. Our scenery is not so elegant – but we can change the places of it and make variations – we have a lake – light blue color, a thicker plastic sheet, the same material but in darker blue, is the see shore and the green is the field. We could make a boat, but we haven’t yet.Out of some paper forms ( looks like PM clay produces to keep safe in the box items like a fax machine) on which I added some construction and cover with classical paper mache- we have a volcano and a snow mountain.
      That’s all of our ideas – oh, there is a rock with several caves too for his little dinosaurs figures to sleep in.
      Good luck! I think it is fun to do something together with children and they will have the memories from that time for ever, plus will eventually like making it again and have the knowledge to do it again in their life…..
      Deyana

      Reply
    2. Chris
      Chris at |

      Hi Donna
      I have just finished a picture that I used an old picture in a frame that I had, applied the clay and painted it. I did cut out some of the back ground on the canvas board, (so you can see the wall behind it), its a bit different but looks good. I will post a pic soon, but I am putting it in an art show at easter, so will wait till the show is over before I put the pic up. This was a canvas stuck on a board, so strong enough to hold the weight of the clay.
      Chris

      Reply
  25. Emi
    Emi at |

    Hi! I have a question: is the joint compound very important? What happens if I leave it out from my paper mache clay?

    Reply
  26. michael connor
    michael connor at |

    Thanks for this great site!!

    I’m thinking of casting the paper mache ‘clay’ into a silicone mold
    to make thin (1/2″) hexagonal tiles for gaming purposes, question:
    Is there any possibility of shrinkage or warping of the clay upon drying??
    It’s very important that the clay dries so that I get uniform tiles that can be fit together.

    MC

    Reply
  27. Debrakadabra
    Debrakadabra at |

    For stronger joints, maybe I could make the joints whether flat plane articulations or ball joints out of wood or plastic, and somehow affix the poured paper mache parts onto them(??). I will have to start experimenting!!

    I will stay on the lookout for pourable paper mache recipes. Some European sites might have some (??). I will post if I find something.
    Thank you for the LI-QUA-CHE tutorial above. It was very helpful.

    Reply
  28. Debrakadabra
    Debrakadabra at |

    Your web site is terrific! I am interested in eventually making articulated dolls that are partially made of sculpted paper mache, but mostly of POURABLE paper mache into plaster moulds. Do you have a recipe for the later, or any recommended sites where I can learn about this process. THANKS. KEEP UP THE GREAT INSPIRING WORK. db

    Reply
    1. Katelynn
      Katelynn at |

      Articulated dolls? Like ball jointed dolls? I don’t know how durable the paper mache would be if thinned into a more watery solution..

      Reply
  29. Steve
    Steve at |

    Hi Jonni,

    I have an unusual question, but it seems like if there is an answer this is where I’ll find it. I have a vague idea of trying to make paper mache forms, that can be used as a kind of disposable mold on which to build fibreglass structures. I was thinking that I might be able to use a paste-less, lightly pressed and dried, structure which could then absorb the resin and become part of the structure of the fibreglass object.

    So my question are:

    1) Is there a paste-less way of doing paper mache? And do you have any tips for how to do that?
    2) Is there a recommended way of creating the forms? I was thinking of panels made by sandwiching between wire screens held in frames.
    3) Is there any other advice or recommendations? I’m a complete n00b, and looking to do this more for the adventure of learning than anything else.

    Thanks for all your help, it’s much appreciated.

    Steve

    Reply
    1. beth
      beth at |

      Hey Steve,

      I looked online and found this little snippet about fiberglass prep with paper mache. I truly think you can use regular old paper mache or Jonniclay as fiberglass resin sticks to everything in site. This tutorial is written in complete layman’s terms and sure might help.

      http://www.paper-wings.org/tutorials/armor/fiberglass.html

      Reply
    2. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Hi Steve, I must say I’m a bit confused about what it is you are asking so I will list the assumptions I made to try and understand the main thrust of your inquiry and you could reply and correct the wrong assumptions I made. It would also be helpful to know what you are trying to make.

      Assumption #1:
      I’m guessing when you talked about “a kind of disposable mold….” could I change the word “disposable” to “consumable” because you want to incorporate this “mold’ in to some kind of fiberglass structure. Is that even close to what you would like to do?

      Assumption #2:
      You want to 1st copy a shape or “mold” it as you say, in paper mache so you can the make this shape with fiberglass and resin. Is this close to what your intentions is?

      Assumption #3:
      You don’t want to use paste with the paper because it might interfere with the fiberglass process. This is a wild guess on my part but I’m guessing it may be close to your reason to go “paste-less”?

      Your 1st question about going paste-less.
      I have mashed up newspaper fine enough to make a rather robust ball from it using no paste of any kind after I squeezed the water out of it with my fingers and rolled into a ball in the palm of my hand…When it dried it maintained its shape and is very light (no paste) I did add salt as a preservative, but no paste and I posted a picture of it here as well. I was thinking there was enough of binder (or what ever is used to make newspaper into sheets) in the water after I broke down the pieces of newspaper to mush (pulp) so maybe it wasn’t exactly “paste-less” but nothing I added.

      Your 2nd question about creating “forms”…That could mean using an existing shape like a commercially purchased mask as a form as an example and making a replica of that or making the mask from the beginning or from “scratch” as it is often call. Your use of the word “panel” in this context is unclear to me?
      I have suggested using window screening material as a support structure sandwiched between layers of JonniClay. Fiberglass window screening material is almost like fabric and would be easier to deal with as compared to metal screening but have never used it and of course many people have used chicken wire as underlying support or “form”. What I have used is cotton t-shirt material and/or pieces of old cotton pillow cases sandwiched between layers of PM clay (or JonniClay) “molded” around Al Foil that was first pressed to a shape I made from a cardboard armature. When this “composite” material of cotton cloth and PM clay or JonniClay dries on the Al foil “mold” it is surprisingly thin, stiff and strong and easy to remove with a release agent put on the foil but in both cases paste is used in the mix.

      Could you use the above method, let it dry then fiberglass over that? I think it would stick to the PM structure or perhaps you could use a release agent and remove the PM structure when all the fiberglass has set?

      Is any of the above even close to understanding your intent?

      Bob C.

      Reply
    3. Erin
      Erin at |

      When fiberglassing there are a couple things to consider.
      1. Fiberglass mat, fiberglass fabric, or really cool looking and expensive carbon-fiber fabric? The two fabrics work more or less the same. Mat however leaves shreds everywhere, even with the best containment system – whatever you touch will have stuff on it. Mat also requires you to press out all the excess resin – the more you press out, the stronger your work will be. Fabric has the same requirement too, but it’s more forgiving. Pressing out excess resin is also a cost saving since resin is expensive.
      2. Epoxy resin or polyester? Polyester is cheaper by 25%-50%, but it tends to be thicker and it has a yellow/brown tint to it (There is a surfboard polyester, but I’ve not used it). Polyester also stinks forever, so you absolutely must skip it if you plan on wearing something. Resin also gets very hot as it cures – keep away from skin and meltable things.
      3. The catalysts and solvents eat everything, except taxes and ogres. Your hands will have a white layer of dead skin for days – get several boxes of disposable gloves.
      4. If you have an armature, it will become part of your fiberglass project unless you plan ahead and build in pieces and use a good amount of PVA mold release and/or wax.
      5. Have fun and don’t stick yourself to the workshop floor (you’d be surprised how easy it is to do).

      Erin

      Reply
  30. Simran
    Simran at |

    Hi Jonni
    i need help in making a pig’s head by papermache clay could you help me by giving me some tips?

    Reply
  31. Simran
    Simran at |

    hey i need to make just the pig head by paper mache clay but need some ideas and also is there any way i could order it online from your website?

    Reply
  32. Shannon Ryan
    Shannon Ryan at |

    Thank you both for your advice…I finished coating a pretty large rock a couple hours ago. I took your advice and it’s drying inside a plastic storage tote with a space heater pointed in it’s direction. I’ve thought about plaster of Paris and using it but I really like the workability of your recipe and I need the durability to drill or screw into the rocks. The five original rocks I was going to use are mounted on a shaped piece of OSB board covered in the paper mâché clay and I didn’t have to use a screw, a drop of glue or anything. And it’s a tough piece that I will eventually use on something else. I did add about 1/2 c. Plaster of Paris to the mix tonight to see if it might a little fire under it. Will keep you
    posted…hopefully ready to paint/wash by morning. Thanks again! Looking forward to trying new things as I learn more in the art of taxidermy habitats!

    Reply
  33. Violet Barnett
    Violet Barnett at |

    Hi there, First I would like to say I think this is an awesome site and very inspiring. I have one question well maybe more than one. They say on other Youtube videos to let the sculpture dry between layers so as not to get moldy but the clay is applied much thicker than paper width so how come it doesn’t get moldy? How long would you let it dry (silly question I guess it depends on the thickness Dah!) What I mean is, it would feel dry on the surface before the middle so how would you know when it is dry completly ??

    Reply
    1. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Hi Violet, You’er right drying time is a factor and has many variables including the one you mentioned, thickness, but other variables include the local environment around your piece like temperature, humidity, a fan or an oven, the kind and type of armature (if any) or is the pierce hollow (ie. a chicken wire frame) to allow air to circulate on both sides of
      your piece, the kind and percent of “other” ingredients in the mix etc. These are all considerations that can affect drying time.

      I have NEVER had mold in any of my work (admittedly only 2 years of making paper mache sculptures) but the one variable I always include in the mix is regular table salt. I use it in my paste when doing paper strips and paste or in my pulp when I’m making paper mache clay. I have learned to use an old Osterizer blender to replace the toilet paper (TP) in Jonni’s recipe with newspaper and get creamy results so adding 1 tablespoon of salt works for me with both TP and newspaper. I add the salt when making the pulp and set any extra freshly made pulp aside as a very wet mix in an air tight tub in the refrigerator. When more pulp is required I squeeze out the excess water to use it as needed. I have successfully used pulp months after it was made when stored this way.

      Drying is important to prevent mold and for me adding table salt is too.

      Reply
  34. Katelynn
    Katelynn at |

    Hi, I’m wondering how durable this stuff is. I’m wanting to make a ball jointed doll and I can’t get my regular white clay to get thin enough or else it may break. So I’m just curious how strong this paper mache clay is.
    Thank you

    Reply
  35. Shannon Ryan
    Shannon Ryan at |

    I’m in a pinch…I’ve been using your recipe to create habitat rock bases for taxidermy projects. I make everything ahead of time and it works great. Well, my husband is entering a competition with a duck that was supposed to be in a flying position. The competition is Saturday and due to his late performance (haha), he was unable to make the duck a flyer so now I need one large rock pronto!!!! And I need to speed up drying time on mâché…any suggestions or am I just out of luck? All of my projects thus far have taken much more than 24 hrs to dry!!!

    Reply
    1. Steve
      Steve at |

      Hi Shannon,
      I’d suggest drying the rock using a heating fan (about ten bucks at Target) and place it in a closet (or even under a large box). The trapped moving heat should dry it very quickly. If you don’t have a heating fan then a regular fan plus a space heater. Make sure there’s nothing flammable in the vicinity of any heating elements. The closet will get very hot so check it periodically. I use a small room for this and it feels like walking into an oven.
      Also, when you initially mix your mache add acrylic gray color so it dries close to your intended final “rock”color, eliminating paint drying time. You can add detail glazing or rock-like speckles on top of that after it comes out of the heated closet—which will dry faster than a full coat of paint. Your rock may not be 100% dry through and through but should be plenty solid to use for display.

      Reply
      1. Steve
        Steve at |

        Oops….. I see Jonni answered with same advice before mine posted. Nevermind!

        btw…not sure exactly how big your rock is, but plaster of paris sets within hours and can be used even if not technically “dry”. Once set(but still moist) it can be carved for making cracks or rock-ish effects.

        Reply
  36. Leanne
    Leanne at |

    finially I found a recipe for paper mache clay. Yours looks so easy to make, I can’t wait to make my first patch. I will be useing this to make miniature vases and planters and stone and brick for the miniature gardens and landscaping I do for dollhouse settings. the vessels will hold tiny flowers (less than 1/4 inch) I make. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
  37. Karen Hodges
    Karen Hodges at |

    Hi. My son and I made our first bowl of paper mache clay. I am amazed at how easy it is to manipulate. We are working on an Egyptian Cat. It is looking amazing. I will send photos if you would like.
    Thank you so much for sharing your recipe.
    Karen Hodges

    Reply
  38. Deyana
    Deyana at |

    Hi, I am not writing often, but I follow all the coments and everybody’s projects. I am learning, especially as many of the terms are very new for me. This forum is so helpful.
    Very sad – even I followed all the steps I couldn’t see Debbie’s vases. I have no patience to see Bob’s figure too. Is it any other way you could post the photos, so it is easier to see?
    I am a bit “stuck” with my boat project and not very sure if the day I will have it finished will come, but if will – I would also like to know an easy way to post the photo of it. DropMocks is not working for me.
    Looking foreward for more photos
    deyana

    Reply
  39. Rona
    Rona at |

    Hi sorry to bother but I’m in Canada and I’m English so finding all these product names a bit confusing!!! I’m guessing the white glue is what I call PVA glue but what is Joint compound??? Ha ha! Thank you!

    Ro

    Reply
  40. Nikki
    Nikki at |

    I haven’t been able to see Debbie’s photos, either. Would love to see them!

    Reply
  41. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    Hi Debbie,

    I am not able to open the link. BUMMER!! I was hoping to see some more of your work. By the way, my boyfriend and I made some clay last night using the correct ingredient : ) The texture is pretty much similar to the other batch I made using the softner LOLOLOL!!! Anyway it all worked out. I can’t wait to show you all my props ; )

    Reply
  42. Debbie Vandeventer
    Debbie Vandeventer at |

    Here are three of my vases!! They are done… finally!! :)

    http://www.dropmocks.com/mSj4s
    Debbie

    Reply
    1. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Very nice Debbie, Three relatively large projects done, congratulations! Such nice shapes and great colors too.

      Thank you for sharing your efforts here.

      Bob C.

      Reply
      1. Debbie Vandeventer
        Debbie Vandeventer at |

        Hi Bob…
        Yes… they are three very large projects, considering they were my “first”!! I learned a lot about how to create shapes… as well as what works… and what doesn’t!!

        The big, red, round one isn’t as “round” as I would have liked it. But… I tried a different type of armature. It was difficult to get a perfectly round shape. I spent hours adding crumpled up newspaper and masking tape… as well as layer and layer of clay. If I kept adding more clay… it would have ended up being the size of a VW!! LOL!!

        The tall pitcher is just a mistake in the making!! LOL!! It started out as something else because I was experimenting with using plastic containers as armatures and then shaping with crumpled up newspaper and masking tape. I wasn’t sure how to finish off the top… but I had to do something to cover up some awful mistakes!! Yeah… we’ll just call the mistakes… “experiments” instead of mistakes!! LOL!! I added the handle because it ended up being a pitcher… and I wanted it to have a handle!! LOL!!

        The shape of the green one is an “accident”, as well. The narrower sides on the green vase actually shrunk when I used the paper and paste mixture, before using the clay. That was when I thought you HAD to have a few layers of the paper and paste before adding the clay layer!! Yeah… another lesson!! LOL!! The paper and paste made the armature shrink as it dried and the sides ended up concave. I really liked the way it looked… so I just went with it!! LOL!!

        I antiqued them all with a great product that Jonni told me about. It’s made by Golden and it is an Acrylic Glazing Liquid (Satin finish). You just mix it with a dark brown paint and apply it… then wipe it off.

        I am still working on the plant stand. It is 30″ tall and each side is 10″ wide. It is taking forever to clay!! I just painted my cross this morning and as soon as I antique it… I will post a picture.

        Debbie :)

        Reply
        1. Bob C.
          Bob C. at |

          Ahh yes “experiments” indeed but your have turned then into admirable art pieces Debbie, they really look great! Love the finish!

          Part of the attraction of doing PM sculpture for me is the challenge of “mastering” the process and the opportunity to be challenged again and again. I agree one must be flexible and adjust to the circumstances but perhaps I’m just stubborn because, for the most part, I try to make the stuff I work on conform to the original concept I had as I began. Sometimes that means I stop working on a project because it’s not “going well” and I will set it aside to “consider the problem” but sometimes I “let it happen” hehehe!

          My 1st basic humanoid figure is an example of that. It is almost finished now but I had several “issues” with that and it has taken me a couple of months to sort it out and because it is a human figure I’m toying with the idea of giving it a faux bronze finish, something I’ve not done before. That has become another new challenge for this project. I also want to mount it on a fancy stained and glossy wooden base….another new area to explore!

          Working this way does slows me down and as a result I don’t make something new every week but it does force me to learn more about what is going on as I consider what options are available to accomplish my design goal. Just another way of working, I guess. I have also learned to have several projects going at once and that helps put the “problem project” on the back burner to slowly simmer in my subconscious as I change focus to the current project. That has been a very helpful approach for me. I guess if I was doing this as a commercial endeavor that approach would not work well.

          Bob C.

          Reply
          1. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Hi Bob…
            The project that started all of this for me was a 30″ tall, floor vase (which you probably remember me talking about). It is now laying in the corner of my studio!! I got so frustrated with trying to “perfect” the shape… that I finally decided to put it aside for a while and finish the other projects I had going. I may never touch it again!! LOL!!

            My next projects are a spaceship, a pillar candle holder, a large, decorative platter and some sort of snowman/Christmas project. Of course… before I even consider starting these… I need to get the plant stand done!!

            Any suggestions??? I have been using the Golden Acrylic Glazing Liquid mixed with brown paint to antique my projects. Does anyone have another antiquing method? I am always looking for alternatives. :)

            I tried antiquing with stain… but it left the project too shiny. I also tried a Ralph Lauren Glaze in Tea Stain… but it didn’t really antique the way that I wanted it to. I don’t want to buy the traditional “kit” to antique. I would much rather use something to “wipe-on/wipe-off”.

            Any ideas???

            Thanks!!
            Debbie

          2. Bob C.
            Bob C. at |

            Hi Debbie, You asked the question “any ideas”?
            Hummmm….ideas? I almost always do, some good some not so good perhaps? …. See below for a couple of thoughts:

            On the topic of your plant stand I would suggest putting it aside and not just physically but emotionally too. Leave it for “dead” in your mind at least for a while just to take the “pressure” off and start a “fun” project. You have learned so much with your recent PM efforts I bet the spaceship or candle holder would be fun projects and be a nice distraction, give yourself permission to do a fun project.

            About antiquing:
            I have only done so with wood, nothing to do with PM but I have used the so called “dry brush” technique when I made my PM frog. I applied 6 colors to that, some with the dried brush technique and some with the paint and wipe approach.

            One of the other things I did and am doing now as I try to figure out how to do a faux bronze finish is to make a surface like the piece I’m working on and practice my painting techniques there first. That really helps me a “feel” for things!

            I just did a Bing.com search on “antiquing paper mache” and got a lot of hits. Maybe worth a try for you.

            Bob C.

          3. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Hi Bob…
            The plant stand is going well… it’s my first tall, floor vase that “bit the dust”!! LOL!! It is laying in the corner and that’s where it’s going to stay for a while!!

            I’ll do some searches for antiquing ideas and share what I find. :)

            I just applied another layer of clay on the plant stand. I also applied a “lip” around the opening of the other 30″ tall, floor vase. This vase is coming along nicely and as soon as the “lip” dries, I am going to sand it (I had two going at once). I also started a couple of “fun” projects.

            Debbie :)

          4. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Hi Bob…
            I researched antiquing products and I am going to try Minwax Gel Stain in Aged Oak (#602). I found a lot of antique glazes, crackle mediums, and inks… but I think this gel stain will give me the aged look that I want.

            I’ll let you know how it works!! I’ll post pictures too!!

            Debbie :)

          5. Bob C.
            Bob C. at |

            Hi Debbie, Using a gel stain should allow for thickness variations of the stain which should give you more variation in color, an interesting choice. I’ve never used a gel stain. Please tell us how that works for you and I’d love to see pictures, of course!

            I just finished the wooden base for my humanoid sculpt using 3 coats of regular Minwax Red Mahogany 223 and two coats of Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane. I’m getting ready to paint the actual PM sculpt base color, a bit darker than burnt umber, then a green patina using the paint and wipe technique and finally the metallic brassy/bronze highlights using the dry brush technique!

            All the paints on the PM sculpt will be acrylic but I may finish with a nice clear Krylon matte “acrylic” spray that worked well on my plant stand attempt. Geees, maybe I’ll just spray paint the whole thing purple, it will be easier and MUCH faster! ;-) Naaaaah!

    2. Carmelina
      Carmelina at |

      OMG! Debbie the vases look BEAUTIFUL! I was able to pull up the pics on my iPod touch of all this! Very talented Debbie! SHOW US MORE!

      Reply
      1. Debbie Vandeventer
        Debbie Vandeventer at |

        Thanks, Carmelina!! As soon as I finish more… I will post pictures!!

        Debbie :)

        Reply
    3. Carol
      Carol at |

      They are beautiful! Is there something you can coat on the inside to make them water proof?

      Reply
    4. Bina
      Bina at |

      Gorgeous!

      Reply
  43. Kaya
    Kaya at |

    So my local home depot only had the DAP wallboard joint compound. Does that mean I still need a respirator/dust mask when sanding it? I was hoping that paperclay would help me avoid toxic materials. My last project involved fiberglass. D’oh. >.<

    I bought the DAP brand that has all the warnings all over it cus its all they had. Any suggestions for working with it? Or for an alternative less bad for ya brand?

    Reply
  44. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    Debbie how many layers of your special caly do you normaly apply? what is the name of the drywall joint compound you use? I use westpac. So let me get this straight-NO RUBBERY FEELING IN THE CLAY? all cellulose brands you find in the hardware stores have borates so you are not experiencing rubber-like texture in your clay? I did a small mix the other day with the cellulose I bought @ home depot a while back and I did not get any rubber like feel in the clay so I think I am good. Jonni needs to buy Westpac if she is still experiencing the rubber like texture. When I used Jonni’s recipe I got a dough like feel so I must have added way too much flour but it still worked. I am definitly excited about your recipe and will get to it this week for sure!!!

    Reply
    1. Debbie Vandeventer
      Debbie Vandeventer at |

      Hi Carmelina,
      How many layers do I normally apply? It depends. Most times I do two layers. Just be sure to let each layer dry completely. I use a short icing knife to apply the clay to the armature. I also use an old butter knife and my fingers to manipulate and smooth out the clay.

      I use DAP Wallboard Joint Compound. I bought it at Lowe’s.

      I haven’t had a problem with rubbery clay. I posted some information the other day about using a paint mixing drill attachment and moving the drill in a counterclockwise motion. If I let the drill spin clockwise, I can see the mixture “ball up”. However, when I force it in a counterclockwise motion… it breaks up the mixture.

      I like to use a thicker clay. I add handfuls of cellulose fiberfill and mix well in-between each addition of the fiberfill. I don’t like a loose, wet mixture. I find it imperative to move the drill in a counterclockwise motion, as it really breaks up the fiberfill and the clay mixes up nicely. When I think it’s thick enough… I add one more handful! LOL! Again… I find it easier to use a thicker mixture. :)

      I hope this helps.

      Debbie

      Reply
    2. Debbie Vandeventer
      Debbie Vandeventer at |

      The pictures posted here make the vases look “squatty”. They’re not that squatty! LOL!!!! :)

      Debbie

      Reply
      1. Carmelia
        Carmelia at |

        Debbie

        The vases look great!! I will try out your method of mixing as well as the clay recipe!! I will post my stuff as soon as I make some time!! I am preparing for halloween already!! LOL!! I LOVE HALLOWEEN!!!

        Reply
        1. Carmelia
          Carmelia at |

          Oops spelt my own name wrong LOLOL!! Anyway, I will get my pics up soon : )

          Reply
      2. Carmelina
        Carmelina at |

        Hi Debbie,

        I made your batch of clay. Is it suppose to feel like pizza dough. It’s not sticky. I did not mix it with a drill because I was just experimenting. I will use the drill next time. It was starting to get a little rubbery but I broke it up and mixed it really good with my hand (w/glove of course). So what do you think? I used plenty of cellulose fibers. Do you get that same time of texture? pizza dough?

        Reply
        1. Debbie Vandeventer
          Debbie Vandeventer at |

          Hi Carmelina,
          Hmmmm… pizza dough?? LOL!! I never really thought of it feeling like pizza dough!! But… I guess it kind of does feel like pizza dough!! LOL!!

          I’ve always used the drill attachment, so I don’t know how well you were able to get it mixed up with your hands. But I’m sure if everything is mixed up well and you don’t have any clumps… you’re good to go!! LOL!!

          I never noticed the mixture to be “rubbery” and I was surprised to hear it described that way. It also goes on smooth and is very easy to mold. I think there are two keys… using enough cellulose fiberfill so that it is a thicker mixture. If it’s too wet… it’s like gravy!! LOL!! And… moving the drill in a counterclockwise motion to break up the mixture.

          I can’t wait to see your final project!! :)

          Debbie

          Reply
          1. Carmelina
            Carmelina at |

            LOL!! Hi Debbie,

            Almost like pizza dough but very sturdy when it dries. How long does it take to dry? I have small of your clay on my shelf and it’s taking a while to dry. This is just a tester but I will apply it to my armature soon : )

          2. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Hi…
            I have a tower heater in my studio and I use it to help dry my projects. Drying time depends on how thick I apply the clay. I take Jonni’s advice and let them dry completely!

            I sanded three of my projects yesterday and they look great! I am painting them today. I want them to have an old-world, Tuscan look so I am going to use an aging technique after I paint them.

            Good luck with your project and keep us posted! :)

            Debbie

          3. Carmelina
            Carmelina at |

            Hi Debbie,

            I notice you mentioned liquid detergent in your recipe. Do you also use liquid starch? You mentioned that in another post. Are they both the same thing?

          4. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Liquid detergent? Did I really say that I use liquid detergent in my mixture? WOW!! I must have been sniffing something REALLY bad because I don’t remember posting anything like that!! LOL!!

            I use “liquid starch” in my mixture. I hope this clears up any misunderstandings!! :)

            Debbie

          5. Carmelina
            Carmelina at |

            Oops my mistake…You had mentioned liquid fabric so I bought liquid softner LOL!! WOWOW I must be sniffing too much detergent LOL……j/k I will make a fresh batch using liquid starch TODAY : ) No wonder my stuff came came like weird pizza dough LOLOLOL!! Thanks for your patience : ) Talk to you soon!!! My props are on the way….stay tuned!!

          6. Carmelina
            Carmelina at |

            Check your post on March 2,2011 Liquid Fabric softner : ) I should have known you meant liquid corn starch. ANyway, do you buy the starch or do you make it yourself?

          7. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            OMG!! OMG!! OMG!! I DID say liquid fabric softener!! I am SOOOOOO sorry!! ROFLMAO!!!!! What was I thinking??? I am SO sorry!! :)

            Here is the corrected recipe:
            6 cups flour
            1 cup liquid starch
            1 cup white glue
            2 T. salt
            Warm water
            1 cup joint compound
            Cellulose fiberfill

            Mix the first 5 ingredients together, using a drill with a paint mixer attachment, until it’s the consistency of very thin pancake batter. Add the joint compound and mix well. Slowly add the cellulose fiberfill and mix until it becomes a workable and spreadable consistency. Move the drill in a counterclockwise motion when mixing in the fiberfill.

            Good luck!! :)
            Debbie

          8. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            Thank you for editing my original recipe!! I can’t believe I goofed like that!! LOL!!

            I am always experimenting with recipes… even in the kitchen!! I like all of the recipes that I’ve tried so far, for different reasons. This one, in particular, is excellent for my purposes right now. It mixes up with ease… it is very easy to apply… it dries without cracking… and it is very easy to sand!!

            I just bought Golden’s Acrylic Glazing Liquid (Satin) and will try it this weekend. I’ll post pictures when they are done!! I’m so close to finishing them!! YAY!! :)

            Thanks again, Jonni!!

            Debbie

          9. Debbie Vandeventer
            Debbie Vandeventer at |

            I buy the “LIQUID STARCH” at Walmart.

  45. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    OMG!!! DEBBIE!! VERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRY KEWL!!!!! WOWOWOWOW!!! CANT WAIT TO SEE YOUR FINISHED WORK!!!!

    Reply
    1. Debbie Vandeventer
      Debbie Vandeventer at |

      Thanks, Carmelina!! :) :) :)

      Reply
  46. Lexi
    Lexi at |

    Hi Jonni: I am in awe of both your talent and your willingness to help others. Right now I’m working on my first paper mache project using the flour and water method but with my next project I want to switch to your recipe using paper mache clay.

    Before going out and buying materials, I was hoping you could tell us what brand joint compound to buy. I’d really hate to buy the wrong brand, find it doesn’t work right and get discouraged. You said, “At least one manufacturer (Dap brand) of joint compound has changed their formula, and this brand no longer works for paper mache clay.” Could you tell me the brand you use so I can go find that one.

    Thanks so much.

    Reply
    1. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Hi Jonni (and Lexi), I was about to post an update in this ongoing wallboard compound topic when I saw Lexi’s post about it so I thought to add my $.02 here.
      You may recall I mentioned my tub of wallboard compound was running low. I bought a replacement tub and it worked just fine.
      The old tub had a brand name of “Wel-Cote” made by “Welco Manufacturing Co” and worked well. It did not list ingredients and had no warning labels on it of any kind.
      The new tub I just bought at Home Depot was not “Wel-Cote” sadly because Home Depot did not carry that same brand so I purchased a no name brand simply called ” WallBoard Joint Compound” with a copyright name in small print “© 2007 Phenomenal Brands” a division of DAP Products Inc. of all places!
      It has all kinds of warnings on it about using with “adequate ventilation” and using an “approved” a mask when sanding etc etc. It does also list Crystalline Silica as an ingredient and I know dust from that can cause problems. So this seems like a different kind of thing from what I had or (and less likely) my old stuff just didn’t list the ingredients.

      But the good news is it worked well when mixed with PVA glue and dryer lint to make a good PM clay with no balling up or Flubber like blobs. I did my “standard” mold onto a ball test and that all worked just fine. So both brands work in PM clay with PVA glue. I hope this adds some clarity to the topic.
      I have attached a picture of both.

      Bob C.

      Reply
      1. Debbie Vandeventer
        Debbie Vandeventer at |

        I’ve been using DAP Wallboard Joint Compound and I haven’t had any problems with it.

        Debbie

        Reply
  47. Debbie Vandeventer
    Debbie Vandeventer at |

    Here are my four vases. They are ready to be sanded. I will post a picture when they are painted and ready to display!
    paper mache vases

    Here is a cross, but it has just one layer of clay on it. I need to add another layer and then I will add some details. I will post a picture when it’s done.

    paper mache cross

    The 30″ plant stand is still in the beginning stages. I will take a picture as soon as I have the first layer of clay on it.

    Debbie

    Reply
    1. Bob C.
      Bob C. at |

      Excellent Debbie, Impressive array of vases….. I don’t envy the sanding job ahead of you but they do look relatively smooth before sanding and that should help, another advantage of JonniClay.

      The cross look great too, what did you use as an armature for it?

      Bob C.

      Reply
      1. Debbie Vandeventer
        Debbie Vandeventer at |

        Thanks, Bob! :)

        I didn’t use Jonni-Clay for these projects. I’ve been experimenting with different mixtures. However, they are VERY smooth. It shouldn’t take too much work to get them ready to paint. For one of the vases, I patted the clay on with my fingers to get a rough finish. I wanted it to look like a piece of Tuscan pottery.

        For the cross… I cut two crosses out of foam board. (I went to the Dollar Store and found 24″x30″ foam board for $1!) I put a wooden spacer in between the two pieces of foam board and hot glued the wood to the foam board. I used masking tape to connect them. I then frosted the cross like a cake with the clay! VERY easy! I LOVE how it looks now… but I still want to clean it up a little bit. I also want to build up a simple, 3-D design on it. I’ll post a picture when it’s done.

        My plant stand is coming along nicely. It’s big… so it’s time consuming. I’ll post a picture of it after I put the next layer of clay on it.

        Debbie

        Reply
  48. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    I can’t wait to see your finished projects Debbie!!!! I can’t wait to try out your recipe!!!! Soon enough!!!

    Reply
  49. Carmelina
    Carmelina at |

    I have not started on my fun projects yet but as soon as I begin and finish I will show you my stuff. For now I have to finish up with traffic school (lol) then I will do my fun projects. Can’t wait to show my pumpkins!!! VERY SOON!!

    Reply

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